Evading The Storm

K

Kirk

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Evading The Storm


- Standing naturally with feet together, have your left foot move
to 9 o'clock into a right reverse bow stance.

- As your right extended outward blocks and grabs outside of
opponent's right wrist, immediately deliver a right roundhouse
kick to opponent's groiin. (Left hand checking at chest.)

- Plant your right foot (toward 1 o'clock) into a right neutral bow
as your right hand pulls opponent's right wrist down and past
your right hip and your left hand punches to opponent's right
ribs. This is done as you pivot into a right forward bow.

- Deliver a left knee kick to outside of opponent's right thigh.

- Immediately spring and pivot counter clockwise and drop
(utilizing marriage of gravity) into a left close kneel thus breaking
opponent's right knee or ankle.
 
I think I've stated it enough that I'm no authority here. Hell,
I was taught this tech like 2 or 3 weeks ago. I'm just posting
it here to get a discussion going about a tech I'm aware of. The
others have unfolded so quickly, or before I knew the tech, that
I wasn't able to partake in the disscusion. Just please know my
intent here! I'm just a newbie. Let's discuss! :)
 
Kirk, the "Evading the Storm," I was taught differs a bit, though I see from Mr. Tatum's manual that the base moves are very much what you've cited.

Primarily, I wouldn't recommend taking your feet off the mat except to kick: pivoting and shifting your weight is perhaps better than lifting and "planting," and the technique in its base form doesn't end with jumping into anything: simply pivot (following the left knee) to a left close kneel...

I also tend to see the first moves as a forward bow/neutral bow shift.
 
The only part I've never done is the ending where you buckle the leg by dropping to a left close kneel. Very cool though :cool:

:asian:
 
Originally posted by rmcrobertson

Kirk, the "Evading the Storm," I was taught differs a bit, though I see from Mr. Tatum's manual that the base moves are very much what you've cited.

Primarily, I wouldn't recommend taking your feet off the mat except to kick: pivoting and shifting your weight is perhaps better than lifting and "planting," and the technique in its base form doesn't end with jumping into anything: simply pivot (following the left knee) to a left close kneel...

I also tend to see the first moves as a forward bow/neutral bow shift.

Thanks for the reply. Are there any other notable differences?
One b.b. at my school feels that if you do it as written, and miss
catching the opponent's wrist, that the club will come down on
your knee, there abouts.
 
Originally posted by Kirk

Evading The Storm



- Immediately spring and pivot counter clockwise and drop
(utilizing marriage of gravity) into a left close kneel thus breaking
opponent's right knee or ankle.



same beginning then..

4. Deliver a left knee strike to the outside of your opponents right thigh. (The force of your knee strike should buckle your opponents right knee further, with the possibility of driving your opponent back.)

5. Plant your left foot forward (acting as a GAUGING LEG) while delivering a right roundhouse knee strike to the inside of your opponents right thigh to cause a "Charlie Horse", and immobilize his leg.

6. Execute a right front crossover, and cover toward 9 oclock.


is this an older version?-- anyone else who's seen/learned it this way?
 
Originally posted by jazkiljok





same beginning then..

4. Deliver a left knee strike to the outside of your opponents right thigh. (The force of your knee strike should buckle your opponents right knee further, with the possibility of driving your opponent back.)

5. Plant your left foot forward (acting as a GAUGING LEG) while delivering a right roundhouse knee strike to the inside of your opponents right thigh to cause a "Charlie Horse", and immobilize his leg.

6. Execute a right front crossover, and cover toward 9 oclock.


is this an older version?-- anyone else who's seen/learned it this way?

Thats more or less how it's written in the IKKA manual.

I originally learnt it like that, but I don't do it that way anymore.

Les
 
Originally posted by Kirk

Evading The Storm


- Standing naturally with feet together, have your left foot move
to 9 o'clock into a right reverse bow stance.

- As your right extended outward blocks and grabs outside of
opponent's right wrist, immediately deliver a right roundhouse
kick to opponent's groiin. (Left hand checking at chest.)

- Plant your right foot (toward 1 o'clock) into a right neutral bow
as your right hand pulls opponent's right wrist down and past
your right hip and your left hand punches to opponent's right
ribs. This is done as you pivot into a right forward bow.

- Deliver a left knee kick to outside of opponent's right thigh.

- Immediately spring and pivot counter clockwise and drop
(utilizing marriage of gravity) into a left close kneel thus breaking
opponent's right knee or ankle.


Try move #1 as after stepping to 9 with the left foot, step the right foot into a rear twist toward 7:30. As the attacker steps through forward spring back off of the right foot to deliver a roundhouse to the groin. This is to move the right leg clearly out of the way in case the stick is swung harder and faster at your leg.

When executing the knee strike think of it more as a thrusting knee strike. Drive through the attacker's right thigh to land into a left close kneel towards 1:30 now drop the knee to the right calf.

This ought to spark some more discussion.
Salute,
Jason Farnsworth
 
Originally posted by jazkiljok
same beginning then..

4. Deliver a left knee strike to the outside of your opponents right thigh. (The force of your knee strike should buckle your opponents right knee further, with the possibility of driving your opponent back.)

5. Plant your left foot forward (acting as a GAUGING LEG) while delivering a right roundhouse knee strike to the inside of your opponents right thigh to cause a "Charlie Horse", and immobilize his leg.

6. Execute a right front crossover, and cover toward 9 oclock.


is this an older version?-- anyone else who's seen/learned it this way?

Yes, this was the original way I learned it before we changed it to a less acrobatic ending and in my opinion a more realistic one...... yet it still works fine just a little fancy for the lower levels.

:asian:
 
Originally posted by Kirk
Evading The Storm
- Standing naturally with feet together, have your left foot move to 9 o'clock into a right reverse bow stance.

- As your right extended outward blocks and grabs outside of opponent's right wrist, immediately deliver a right roundhouse kick to opponent's groiin. (Left hand checking at chest.)

Actually this first move ..... even though it is described as a reverse bow stance ...... it really never should be pictured that way except for mechanical breakdown.

It really is step off to 9 o'clock and as you shift your weight from a neutral bow to a reverse bow as you are simultaneously elevating your right leg for the roundhouse kick.

It is all one motion (including the hand actions) but we tend to break it down to show the movement/stance transitions and weight shifts to the beginners. As you get more familiar with the technique you eliminate the excess showing of transitions and merely "do" or go through them vs. purposely "show" them for learning purposes.

This same execution happens all through the system and I see often times it tends to remain and hinder speed and advanced application of the technique as intended. Instructors need to explain and continually shave off beginning methods for more advanced ones as time goes on..... but this is a whole nuther topic.

:asian:
 
Originally posted by Goldendragon7



Yes, this was the original way I learned it before we changed it to a less acrobatic ending and in my opinion a more realistic one...... yet it still works fine just a little fancy for the lower levels.

:asian:

if i'm not mistaken- some one just called me old & FANCY!


excuse me now-- need my geritol..:burp:
 
Originally posted by Goldendragon7



Actually this first move ..... even though it is described as a reverse bow stance ...... it really never should be pictured that way except for mechanical breakdown.

It really is step off to 9 o'clock and as you shift your weight from a neutral bow to a reverse bow as you are simultaneously elevating your right leg for the roundhouse kick.

It is all one motion (including the hand actions) but we tend to break it down to show the movement/stance transitions and weight shifts to the beginners. As you get more familiar with the technique you eliminate the excess showing of transitions and merely "do" or go through them vs. purposely "show" them for learning purposes.

This same execution happens all through the system and I see often times it tends to remain and hinder speed and advanced application of the technique as intended. Instructors need to explain and continually shave off beginning methods for more advanced ones as time goes on..... but this is a whole nuther topic.

:asian:

That makes MUCH more sense! Thank you!
 
same beginning then..

5. Plant your left foot forward (acting as a GAUGING LEG) while delivering a right roundhouse knee strike to the inside of your opponents right thigh to cause a "Charlie Horse", and immobilize his leg.

is this an older version?-- anyone else who's seen/learned it this way?

This is how I learned it initially. Good to see I'm not the only one that learned it that way. I was a little worried when I got back into Kenpo with a school in a different area and saw this tech done different. Another difference in the school was they taught it to the yellow belts as a orange belt technique, instead of purple. Anyone else out there learn this one at yellow belt?
 
I learned it with the initial left-foot steping to 10:30, with an inward left parry and right rising block.

I believe that initially I learned the right rising block going to the wrist, but have seen the block executed like a right forearm just above the elbow and plowing into the attackers body (which deflects the attacker's arm upward).

After the left punch to ribs (or kidney depending on where you've stepped and landed). I was taught a left knee to right thigh, followed by a right knee (upward) to attacker's chest as you pulled his/her right arm downward (and past your right hip). There was also sweep with a simultaneous disarm and club-strike, but I think I've said more than enough to get some sideward looks.
 

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