Can someone explain me this

lowkicksensei

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I always thought that you could only hit the liver if you hit under the rib diagonally from bottom to top, a classic liver hook or a left liver kick, but on the anatomy it looks like the liver is directly under the solar plexus? it doesn't look protected either? Can you also hit the liver if you hit the middle under the chest? I don't understand that? My trainer never talked about it, we just learned the classic liver hook? than from which angles can the liver be hit?
 

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Dirty Dog

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Shock waves, especially in the mostly water human body, follow the laws of fluid dynamics. You can hit close to the liver and the shock wave will still hit it. But it will be at a lower level of force than a direct impact.
The part of the liver most sensitive to impacts is the bit to the right. You can hit the liver, technically, by striking the solar plexus, but the effect of the strike will be more due to stimulation of the vagus nerve than the liver.
 
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HighKick

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I was taught to aim at the short rib. Does this make sense?
 

drop bear

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You can hit pretty much anywhere in a band along that area and drop people.

Not sure about the physiologically of why.
 

Dirty Dog

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You can hit pretty much anywhere in a band along that area and drop people.

Not sure about the physiologically of why.
Because it's enervated by the vagus nerve. Striking it has some of the same effects as striking the solar plexus, e.g. decreased heart rate and blood pressure.
 

Gyakuto

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The liver is innervated by both sympathetic (splanchnic) and parasympathetic (vagus CNX) but these control its functions. The liver tissue itself has no sensory nerves (just like the brain!) so cannot produce pain afferent signals but I suspect the capsule membranes that surround it are rich in sensory fibres. This makes sense as the liver is highly vascular so post traumatic haemorrhage is a particular hazard and pain would encourage you to protect it.

Interestingly all veins drain blood directly to the heart. But the liver receives blood from the abdominal organs via its own portal vein! Interesting, eh?
 

Wing Woo Gar

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Because it's enervated by the vagus nerve. Striking it has some of the same effects as striking the solar plexus, e.g. decreased heart rate and blood pressure.
And dont forget digital disimpaction, a potentially deadly technique with which even a novice can kill the victim with barely the flick of a finger
 

Oily Dragon

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Consider this: it's totally legal to attack the liver, but not the kidneys, in boxing.

In Muay Thai kidneys are fair game.
 

Fungus

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I always thought that you could only hit the liver if you hit under the rib diagonally from bottom to top, a classic liver hook or a left liver kick, but on the anatomy it looks like the liver is directly under the solar plexus? it doesn't look protected either? Can you also hit the liver if you hit the middle under the chest? I don't understand that? My trainer never talked about it, we just learned the classic liver hook? than from which angles can the liver be hit?
I am guessing that a big part of the liver is very close underneath the lower ribs on the right side, and when getting punched into the ribs, they flex a bit and hit the liver; so minimal "damping". Any strike that flexes the lower ribs, goes into the liver. The lower smaller ribs are i guess also more likely to flex than the mid-ribs?

Blunt Liver Injury with Intact Ribs under Impacts on the Abdomen: A Biomechanical Investigation​

"...Liver injury may be caused by a direct impact with a certain velocity and energy on the abdomen, which may result in a lacerated liver by penetration of fractured ribs. However, liver ruptures without rib cage fractures were found in autopsies in a series of cases. All the victims sustained punches on the abdomen by fist. Many studies have been dedicated to determining the mechanism underlying hepatic injury following abdominal trauma, but most have been empirical. The actual process and biomechanism of liver injury induced by blunt impact on the abdomen, especially with intact ribs remained, are still inexhaustive. In order to investigate this, finite element methods and numerical simulation technology were used. A finite element human torso model was developed from high resolution CT data. The model consists of geometrically-detailed liver and rib cage models and simplified models of soft tissues, thoracic and abdominal organs. Then, the torso model was used in simulations in which the right hypochondrium was punched by a fist from the frontal, lateral, and rear directions, and in each direction with several impact velocities. Overall, the results showed that liver rupture was primarily caused by a direct strike of the ribs induced by blunt impact to the abdomen. Among three impact directions, a lateral impact was most likely to cause liver injury with a minimum punch speed of 5 m/s (the momentum was about 2.447 kg.m/s). Liver injuries could occur in isolation and were not accompanied by rib fractures due to different material characteristics and injury tolerance."
-- Blunt Liver Injury with Intact Ribs under Impacts on the Abdomen: A Biomechanical Investigation
 

Oily Dragon

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It wasn't anything like that. It was (usually) a kicking target for us.
Yep, feet work.

You have knuckles on your feet too, they work in Phoenix Eye Shaolin.

There are sensitive points all up in that area, that's why it makes an effective target.
 
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