Building up our martial arts communities

Brother John

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I have been thinking about this for some time and wanted to know what my martial arts brothers and sisters around the world think of it, please feel free to share!

I believe that the martial arts have a lot to offer the communities that we live/teach in and that we needn't focus as much on the competitive nature of the other 'local schools', but rather can elevate the general perception of the martial arts in our communities. If we were to go to the schools in our area and co-host seminars/workshops, free self-defense workshops, open tournaments, demonstrations in the park...etc. TOGETHER... if we were to do this we could present the martial arts in the powerful and positive lite that they deserve. Schools that squable tear down the positive perception a great deal.

What are some things that an instructor, school board, assistant instructors or students could do to 'build up' the martial arts communities???


lets brain storm together...
Your Brother
John
 
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kenposcum

Guest
Bro-
In theory, I agree with you. Martial artists have a great deal to offer the community, not only with our art, but with the character development that comes with conscientious practice of our arts.
The problem, as I see it, is that the commercialization of the arts has led to phenomenon known as the "McDojo," or the "belt factory." These are schools that have their students buy rank, as oppsed to earning rank. And they churn out hordes of 2-year black belts who couldn't punch their way out of a wet paper bag. Anyone with a modicum of common sense can see that these "McDojoists" clearly cannot fight, are in pitiful condition, and pretty much talk, not walk. First we have to make that coveted black belt mean something again...something that cannot be sold, that must be earned. I like your ideas, however, and I'll be checking in again. :asian:
 
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Abbax8

Guest
I teach a judo class at a school that is primarily TKD, but offers Aikido, jujitsu, kick boxing, cardio classes, a just for kicks class for 4-6 year olds. The school is set up as non-profit. There are NO 2 year black belts here. We offer self defense classes, put on demos for organizations like Big Brother/Bis Sister and do other types of community outreach. We have worked with some other schools in our area. It can work and be a positive example of MA and help enhance the local community as well.

Peace
Dennis
 
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Shinzu

Guest
i am all for it also.

although most of the time it is difficult to see different schools join together because of the competition. i also think the mcjojo's have something to do with it also. if you are going to promote "quality" martial arts, then you want to be with "quality" martial artists.

when we can reach this point, our communities will all better from it. here's to hoping :)
 
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Brother John

Brother John

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It is true that those who hand out a black belt at the bottom of crackerjack boxes do the arts and communities no favors, but how we interact with them can. trying to include them in different community activities and such. But in so doing, maybe we can influence them to up their quality... especially when they join us in those public demos and free self defense lessons and their black belts can't keep up with our yellow belts.
Something to think about!
Your Brother
John
:asian:
 
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kenposcum

Guest
Good point. As an orange belt (back in '97, with approx. 2+ yrs experience), I had the opportunity to spank a black belt with a supposed 27 years (!) in the arts. It was gratifying(Humility! Humility!), and I think I may have dissuaded his students from continuing to learn from Mr. McDojo (this was at a YMCA karate program, I was working as a desk clerk at the time). So maybe you have a point. I'll write more later (I have to go to class now!).:asian:
 
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