Bo Staff training at home

Jedmus

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I was just wondering if anyone knew of any resources that could help with my Bo Staff training at home? For instance any patterns or forms, instructional books?
 

Tez3

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Perhaps some wall filler, paint and brushes too? :D:D:D:D:D:D:D
 

Tez3

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Don't forget ceiling tiles.

It depends, the polystyrene ones are illegal here as a fire risk. I'd suggest going outside but it's autumn so raining.

My instructor showed us how to use a Bo ( don't say Bo staff it upsets the purists as Bo means staff lol), but we never did anything with them in the way of kata etc, though he did hit me straight on the head with one when demonstrating to the kids lol.
 

frank raud

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I was just wondering if anyone knew of any resources that could help with my Bo Staff training at home? For instance any patterns or forms, instructional books?
There are katas for the Bo, which ones would be most beneficial to you would depend on the style you are studying. Hopefully nothing like this
 

Danny T

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Curious, what is the difference in a 'bo', a 'staff', and a 'bo staff'?
My understanding is that a bo is a staff and a staff is a bo so a bo staff would be a bo bo or a staff staff.
 

Gerry Seymour

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I was just wondering if anyone knew of any resources that could help with my Bo Staff training at home? For instance any patterns or forms, instructional books?
On a serious note, have you had any training with a staff before? If you haven't I'd suggest finding someone competent to give you an introduction to basic handling before you train yourself. My reason for this is that training on your own with no foundation will likely result in ingraining bad habits that will be hard to un-learn. Once you have a few basics, extending that on your own will be more beneficial.

So, either look for someone local who will give you a few private lessons on basic staff technique or find a seminar that includes some. In most cases, they'll also teach you a simple kata for the staff, so you'll have something to work with at home.
 

TSDTexan

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Check amazon.com they hAve lots of both dvd and books on bo staff
 

frank raud

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Curious, what is the difference in a 'bo', a 'staff', and a 'bo staff'?
My understanding is that a bo is a staff and a staff is a bo so a bo staff would be a bo bo or a staff staff.
Bo is a Japanese term for a staff, traditionally 1.8m(71 inches) long. A staff is usually an English term for a weapon, traditionally somewhere between 6 an 9 feet long. In most people's minds the terms are interchangeable. A bo staff is redundant.
 

TSDTexan

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Bo is a Japanese term for a staff, traditionally 1.8m(71 inches) long. A staff is usually an English term for a weapon, traditionally somewhere between 6 an 9 feet long. In most people's minds the terms are interchangeable. A bo staff is redundant.

Unless your training in a system with multiple staff lengths, and you speak English or another non japanese language.

While Bo is a proper noun in Japanese,
It would be correct to use it as an adjective in this case:

ad繚jec繚tive
ajktiv/
noun
GRAMMAR
plural noun: adjectives
  1. a word or phrase naming an attribute, added to or grammatically related to a noun to modify or describe it.



An example:
Teacher: everyone go get a staff and line up.
A student asks: Teacher, long ones or short ones?

Vs

Teacher: Everyone go swap out your Bo Staffs (staves) for a Jo staff. Tonight we are learning a new form.
 
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Danny T

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Bo is a Japanese term for a staff, traditionally 1.8m(71 inches) long. A staff is usually an English term for a weapon, traditionally somewhere between 6 an 9 feet long. In most people's minds the terms are interchangeable. A bo staff is redundant.
Yes, I realize that. Was my way of being informative with a question and the answer to show they are the same and that using bo staff is as you stated, redundant.
 

frank raud

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Unless your training in a system with multiple staff lengths, and you speak English or another non japanese language.

While Bo is a proper noun in Japanese,
It would be correct to use it as an adjective in this case:

ad繚jec繚tive
ajktiv/
noun
GRAMMAR
plural noun: adjectives
  1. a word or phrase naming an attribute, added to or grammatically related to a noun to modify or describe it.



An example:
Teacher: everyone go get a staff and line up.
A student asks: Teacher, long ones or short ones?

Vs

Teacher: Everyone go swap out your Bo Staffs (staves) for a Jo staff. Tonight we are learning a new form.[/Quote

For your example to work, the students would have to know the difference in length between a Bo and a Jo(or a Hanbo), otherwise the adjective is irrelevant. AND, if they know what a Bo is, the term Bo staff is redundant.[/QUOTE]
 

TSDTexan

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For your example to work, the students would have to know the difference in length between a Bo and a Jo(or a Hanbo), otherwise the adjective is irrelevant. AND, if they know what a Bo is, the term Bo staff is redundant.
[/QUOTE]

Not necessarily. There maybe a newer student that transfered over from a different system that only used Bo. He or She maybe unfamiliar with the Jo.

English allows the use of proper nouns as a compound term. I know a school that never used Bo or Jo as the terms. They used Long and Short Staff as the terms.

Whatever works
 
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