Bag training at home

Kababayan

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I appreciate everyone's responses. Can you guys tell me why I should use gloves? I'v always done my training on bags and target pads bare handed, except when I was learning boxing for a little while and my coach insisted I wrap my hands and where gloves.

What everybody has said about wearing gloves is right on point. Gloves protect the wrists and hands during hours and hours of hitting the bag. The main reason I think that gloves are important is because many people using heavy bags for the first time don't punch the bag properly. At least when starting, beginners tend to push the bag rather than striking and retracting quickly. There are some really good "How to hit a bag" tutorials on youtube. I would focus on tutorials from boxers, as they tend to hit heavy bags more often than anyone else. That's not to say that going full-bore on a bag doesn't have a place in training; it's very important. But to do that for an entire training session, especially when done incorrectly, can hurt the wrists. I do like hitting the heavy bag without gloves occasionally, but not if I'm doing a long bag workout. I'll go gloveless on the BOB.
 

Flying Crane

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It depends on what you are training for.

If you want full contact competition, then the wraps and gloves protect you from injury during long training sessions. And likewise, wearing wraps and gloves protect you during competition.

The problem is, the wraps and gloves can mask poor technique, that will get you a broken finger or broken wrist if you ever need to throw a real punch outside the ring. The wraps and gloves protect you from injury due to poor technique, and can prevent you from even knowing that your technique is poor. In fact, wearing them can force you to use poor technique that works well enough while wearing them, but would be a disaster if you ever used that technique bare-handed.

So...if you are not interested in competition, and are interested in self defense, then you need to be able to safely punch, without the protection of wraps and gloves. That means you need to train without them. Bare fists on the bag.

In that case, work up gradually to develop the appropriate conditioning and to avoid injury. Even with good instruction, there is an element of self-discovery with a heavy bag, figuring out just how to line up a punch safely. So dont be in a hurry.

And yes, without the wraps and gloves you will not be able to hit the bag for hours at a time. But you dont need to.
 

_Simon_

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It depends on what you are training for.

If you want full contact competition, then the wraps and gloves protect you from injury during long training sessions. And likewise, wearing wraps and gloves protect you during competition.

The problem is, the wraps and gloves can mask poor technique, that will get you a broken finger or broken wrist if you ever need to throw a real punch outside the ring. The wraps and gloves protect you from injury due to poor technique, and can prevent you from even knowing that your technique is poor. In fact, wearing them can force you to use poor technique that works well enough while wearing them, but would be a disaster if you ever used that technique bare-handed.

So...if you are not interested in competition, and are interested in self defense, then you need to be able to safely punch, without the protection of wraps and gloves. That means you need to train without them. Bare fists on the bag.

In that case, work up gradually to develop the appropriate conditioning and to avoid injury. Even with good instruction, there is an element of self-discovery with a heavy bag, figuring out just how to line up a punch safely. So dont be in a hurry.

And yes, without the wraps and gloves you will not be able to hit the bag for hours at a time. But you dont need to.

Great post FC.

Yeah gloves can definitely mask bad technique, hence why I feel it's important to go without them. Not all the time, but it definitely informs you of bad technique.

Another thing people do I've noticed is when starting training on a bag, they see a bag and think "okay I've gotta just hit it hard", and start out just smacking the thing. It's okay to start really slow and light, like seriously slowing your punches riiiight down so that you can gradually build up to harder punches. Focusing on good technique, and once you've gotten the hang of that (being mindful of where on your hand you're striking, keeping a tight fist, straight wrist and being aware it's not compromised there so it can buckle), building up power slowly.

And yeah I've actually never understand how people can go an hour or more on the bag! It exhausts me haha, I much prefer shorter sessions on the bag, but then I guess it depends what you're doing on the bag. I tend to mix it up and drill certain techniques or combos on the bag, feet, legs, hands, elbows, knees etc, and love doing shorter high intensity rounds on it.
 

Flying Crane

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Great post FC.

Yeah gloves can definitely mask bad technique, hence why I feel it's important to go without them. Not all the time, but it definitely informs you of bad technique.

Another thing people do I've noticed is when starting training on a bag, they see a bag and think "okay I've gotta just hit it hard", and start out just smacking the thing. It's okay to start really slow and light, like seriously slowing your punches riiiight down so that you can gradually build up to harder punches. Focusing on good technique, and once you've gotten the hang of that (being mindful of where on your hand you're striking, keeping a tight fist, straight wrist and being aware it's not compromised there so it can buckle), building up power slowly.

And yeah I've actually never understand how people can go an hour or more on the bag! It exhausts me haha, I much prefer shorter sessions on the bag, but then I guess it depends what you're doing on the bag. I tend to mix it up and drill certain techniques or combos on the bag, feet, legs, hands, elbows, knees etc, and love doing shorter high intensity rounds on it.
In the same vein, it is my suggestion that people dont spar against the bag. Instead, systematically drill the basic strikes and gradually work up to short combos. But really focus on the basics, that part should be forever, whatever else comes into the program. Focus on the stances and stance changes and power transfer that goes with that. Make those fundamentals really solid.

I dont see any point in bouncing around and sparring against the heavy bag.
 

Jdokan

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You all have it wrong...don't buy anything use nature....:)
 

Jdokan

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Seriously, I think you need to find what fits your needs. Size of area, etc.. As far as wrapping...A lot of good info here already...again determine "your" use/desire. do what works for you. As an aging guitar player I don't like to damage my hands so my bag work is letter than most here on the forum. I use open hand to slap, then elbows knees kicks. Have fun with whatever your choice.
 

Flying Crane

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Seriously, I think you need to find what fits your needs. Size of area, etc.. As far as wrapping...A lot of good info here already...again determine "your" use/desire. do what works for you. As an aging guitar player I don't like to damage my hands so my bag work is letter than most here on the forum. I use open hand to slap, then elbows knees kicks. Have fun with whatever your choice.
I agree about using caution to avoid long term damage. Unless you intend to do high level full contact competition, you do not need hours and hours of this stuff. A fairly moderate amount of bag work can be enough for most lay persons looking to develop some self defense skills. It just needs to be consistent so the skills are maintained. In my opinion, 30-40 minutes at a time, a couple times a week is plenty. And that time includes kicks and punches.

People sometimes feel they need to train for hours and hours. Dedication is good, do what you enjoy. But personally I think it is possible to become a slave to your training. When that happens, you are out of balance.
 
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