1800's "Pugilism", is it useful?

chrissyp

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So in my martial arts journey, I started off as a boxer, then to Muay thai, and then to Shotokan.

Part of the interest in Shotokan comes from the more realistic defense involving the lack of gloves.

This lead me to try to understand classic Pugilism. If you ever see any old photos, a lot of the defense and techniques are similar to traditional karate.

I found this video, of guy explain it. It seems pretty sound technique, with the exception of him only using one arm to defend. The video gets to the point about the 3 minute mark.

Other than this, does anyone have any input on the style? Or is dead for a reason?

 

Martial D

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Fighting, like any competitive skilled activity, evolves. People innovate, things get better, more streamlined. The football players of today are better, the basketball players, the tennis players, and yes, the boxers. Things that don't evolve get left behind.

Just as we can predict what would happen if we put Michael Jordan on an early 1900s basketball team, we can also predict what happens if we put Tyson or ggg against an old timey boxer. It wouldn't be pretty.

This is partially why we don't see non competitive arts that have been frozen in time in a fighting cage.
 
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chrissyp

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Fighting, like any competitive skilled activity, evolves. People innovate, things get better, more streamlined. The football players of today are better, the basketball players, the tennis players, and yes, the boxers. Things that don't evolve get left behind.

Just as we can predict what would happen if we put Michael Jordan on an early 1900s basketball team, we can also predict what happens if we put Tyson or ggg against an old timey boxer. It wouldn't be pretty.

This is partially why we don't see non competitive arts that have been frozen in time in a fighting cage.
Interesting point of view! Makes sense!
 

Kung Fu Wang

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does anyone have any input on the style?

I like the way that he extends his leading arm (at 5.30). It has the following advantages:

- Since his leading arm is in his opponent's attacking path, his opponent's punch has to deal with his arm first. It's the same strategy that wrestlers like to put hands in front of their knees.
- He can interrupt his opponent's punch farther away from his head. His opponent's punches will have less chance to land on his head.
- The fight starts in his opponent's territory and not in his territory. This is like to set up the anti-missile system on the coast line than in Washington DC.
- It's much more aggressive strategy than to put your arms around you own head (as shown in the following clip).

 
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chrissyp

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I like the way that he extends his leading arm (at 5.30). It has the following advantages:

- Since his leading arm is in his opponent's attacking path, his opponent's punch has to deal with his arm first. It's the same strategy that wrestlers like to put hands in front of their knees.
- He can interrupt his opponent's punch farther away from his head. His opponent's punches will have less chance to land on his head.
- The fight starts in his opponent's territory and not in his territory. This is like to set up the anti-missile system on the coast line than in Washington DC.
- It's much more aggressive strategy than to put your arms around you own head (as shown in the following clip).

I like the long guard! I agree! It also can set up some nice elbows, the only problem I see with it is you have to be weary of feints. But I like the style, he has another video where he expands on it all. The only issue I see other than that, is his epethisis (sp?) On using just one arm for deflection, where as I think both should be used, depending on the strike and angle.
 
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chrissyp

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another technique I studied, is the vertical fist, which is a narrower target, which makes for slipping past a certain blocks easier, and with it being bare knuckle I THINK (i'm not 100%) on this that it's better to strike with because it has a much more natural bone allignment?
 

Kung Fu Wang

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I think both should be used, depending on the strike and angle.
If he uses 2 extend arms, that will be "Chinese zombie guard", or

Chinese_zombie.jpg


"double spears" strategy.

 

jobo

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Fighting, like any competitive skilled activity, evolves. People innovate, things get better, more streamlined. The football players of today are better, the basketball players, the tennis players, and yes, the boxers. Things that don't evolve get left behind.

Just as we can predict what would happen if we put Michael Jordan on an early 1900s basketball team, we can also predict what happens if we put Tyson or ggg against an old timey boxer. It wouldn't be pretty.

This is partially why we don't see non competitive arts that have been frozen in time in a fighting cage.
Well yes and no, it's very difficult to separate the evolution of a sport Performance from the evolution of rules, our understanding of Fitness /performance training ,the evolution of equipment and the evolution of humans, over 50 / 100 years. If old time greats were born day 25years ago, there's a good chance, that Jack Dempsey ,Ali ,John McEnroe, babe Ruth, Pele etc, would still be all time greats. Though Ali would probably be fighting at cruiser weight.give a 1980s McEnroe a 2018 racket, and modern training and he would still be pretty good.

On the topic of boxing,,,or pugilism, give a 1800s boxer a great big pair of gloves to hide behind and out law kicking and they will quickly learn to fight like a modern fighter, just as ggg, would look like a pugilist, if you reversed the change.

Bare fiSt"boxing looks a lot like old time pugilist, because that works,
 
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punisher73

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Well yes and no, it's very difficult to separate the evolution of a sport Performance from the evolution of rules, our understanding of Fitness /performance training ,the evolution of equipment and the evolution of humans, over 50 / 100 years. If old time greats were born day 25years ago, there's a good chance, that Jack Dempsey ,Ali ,John McEnroe, babe Ruth, Pele etc, would still be all time greats. Though Ali would probably be fighting at cruiser weight.give a 1980s McEnroe a 2018 racket, and modern training and he would still be pretty good.

On the topic of boxing,,,or pugilism, give a 1800s boxer a great big pair of gloves to hide behind and out law kicking and they will quickly learn to fight like a modern fighter, just as ggg, would look like a pugilist, if you reversed the change.

Bare fiSt"boxing looks a lot like old time pugilist, because that works,

You beat me to it. Modern boxing looks like modern boxing due to the gloves and rules. Old bareknuckle boxing looks similar to "karate" in many aspects due to how it was used as well. Now, add in all of the other "dirty" tricks of old boxing and it really starts to look like karate, things like forearms, elbows, hammerfists etc.

If you want to explore this idea further, Mark Hatmaker has a couple boxing dvds out that incorporate those things into boxing for self-defense. Also, filipino boxing offers a unique perspective as well.
 

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So in my martial arts journey, I started off as a boxer, then to Muay thai, and then to Shotokan.

Part of the interest in Shotokan comes from the more realistic defense involving the lack of gloves.

This lead me to try to understand classic Pugilism. If you ever see any old photos, a lot of the defense and techniques are similar to traditional karate.

I found this video, of guy explain it. It seems pretty sound technique, with the exception of him only using one arm to defend. The video gets to the point about the 3 minute mark.

Other than this, does anyone have any input on the style? Or is dead for a reason?

Every style, whether dead or alive can teach you something. Take what you need, and leave the rest. Develop your own techniques that work for you afterwards.
 

JowGaWolf

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So in my martial arts journey, I started off as a boxer, then to Muay thai, and then to Shotokan.

Part of the interest in Shotokan comes from the more realistic defense involving the lack of gloves.

This lead me to try to understand classic Pugilism. If you ever see any old photos, a lot of the defense and techniques are similar to traditional karate.

I found this video, of guy explain it. It seems pretty sound technique, with the exception of him only using one arm to defend. The video gets to the point about the 3 minute mark.

Other than this, does anyone have any input on the style? Or is dead for a reason?

Some of the basic principles still hold but a lot of the other principles no longer hold true simply because they have evolved into modern boxing.

I think it still has viable techniques and what you'll discover is that none of those techniques are performed as they were in the 1800s. The movement in the video is modern fight movement and not 1800 fight movement.

The extended lead arm is often used in modern boxing but the application of it differs from the 1800 versions. Maybe one day someone will be able to demonstrate original pulgilism without the evolution of the strikes and tactics
 

jobo

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Some of the basic principles still hold but a lot of the other principles no longer hold true simply because they have evolved into modern boxing.

I think it still has viable techniques and what you'll discover is that none of those techniques are performed as they were in the 1800s. The movement in the video is modern fight movement and not 1800 fight movement.

The extended lead arm is often used in modern boxing but the application of it differs from the 1800 versions. Maybe one day someone will be able to demonstrate original pulgilism without the evolution of the strikes and tactics
How do you know what the movement was like in the 1800s?
 

drop bear

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@lklawson would be your best bet for an answer

Ironically no. We had this out and his theory is that modern boxing is a result of rule changes and not just the evolution of boxing.

My argument that modern fighting has a consistant theme across rulesets, from bare knucke, MMA, kickboxing, boxing, sanda, kudo. And so rule changes are not really a factor was not enough to convince him.

Showing footage of old timey bare knuckle champions. That were technically pretty raw was not enough to convince him.

Champion bare knuckle fighters training in gloves was not enough to convince him


His counter argument was that I am a poo poo head.

There is this romantic idea that bare knucke boxing is somehow more suited to bare knuckle fighting. But the evidence just doesn't support it.

I had the same idea when I spoke to a friend of mine who went from muay thai in 16oz gloves to muay thai in MMA gloves. I assumed there was some sort of mechanical difference that needed to be adressed. (and by the way he actually is a champion fighter. Holds titles and stuff)

And no not really. You get hit more. That is about it.

At some point i really need to bail up chris haseman and see what he says on it.

So we don't really know if there is use in the old style of bare knuckle as I don't know if anyone who is any good uses that method.
 
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drop bear

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I like the way that he extends his leading arm (at 5.30). It has the following advantages:

- Since his leading arm is in his opponent's attacking path, his opponent's punch has to deal with his arm first. It's the same strategy that wrestlers like to put hands in front of their knees.
- He can interrupt his opponent's punch farther away from his head. His opponent's punches will have less chance to land on his head.
- The fight starts in his opponent's territory and not in his territory. This is like to set up the anti-missile system on the coast line than in Washington DC.
- It's much more aggressive strategy than to put your arms around you own head (as shown in the following clip).


That is my issue right there. A lot of unproven claims from guys who are trying to achieve the same results of say a MMA or boxer. But have not demonstrated their ability on that stage.
 

jobo

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That is my issue right there. A lot of unproven claims from guys who are trying to achieve the same results of say a MMA or boxer. But have not demonstrated their ability on that stage.
Well there not trying to get the same results as a mMA or a boxer as they are noT completing in mmA,or boxing, noR would they be allowed to with out gloves and then it wouldn't bare fist fighting if they did,
 

drop bear

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Well there not trying to get the same results as a mMA or a boxer as they are not completing in mmA,or boxing, not would they be allowed to with out gloves

They kind of are. They are trying to get strikes in while avoiding strikes.

And you can compete without gloves. This happens. It is not like self defence where you never drop that pen.

People have done it. We can see them do it. We can talk to guys who have done it. I have just been talking to a guy who competed bare knuckle face punching karate. Chris Hasemen who competed bare knuckle MMA may or may not get back to me on this.

The concept that pugilist guy is doing something that nobody can test isn't the case here. And everything he suggests hinges on people with actual experience in bare knuckle fighting never turn up.
 

EddieCyrax

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I like the long guard! I agree! It also can set up some nice elbows, the only problem I see with it is you have to be weary of feints. But I like the style, he has another video where he expands on it all. The only issue I see other than that, is his epethisis (sp?) On using just one arm for deflection, where as I think both should be used, depending on the strike and angle.

My sparing style is very much geared towards controlling/managing my opponents lead arm.

The guy in the video clearly has skill. This said I would like to see his concept demonstrated against a fighter with his level of competency.

I personally love when my opponent sticks their front arm that far out. It creates all sorts of openings for me as it is easily moved to twist/ break down their posture/stance. I would not be punching his arm. I would use it to maneuver inside or control......

Also,

Nice Arm Bar is also an option if you can work out the timing.
 
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Monkey Turned Wolf

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I like the way that he extends his leading arm (at 5.30). It has the following advantages:

- Since his leading arm is in his opponent's attacking path, his opponent's punch has to deal with his arm first. It's the same strategy that wrestlers like to put hands in front of their knees.
- He can interrupt his opponent's punch farther away from his head. His opponent's punches will have less chance to land on his head.
- The fight starts in his opponent's territory and not in his territory. This is like to set up the anti-missile system on the coast line than in Washington DC.
- It's much more aggressive strategy than to put your arms around you own head (as shown in the following clip).

Focusing on the part at 5:30...I did not listen with sound, so I may have missed something. But I don't see why you would attack someones arm like that if they put it out. To me it doesn't accomplish anything, and hurts you. I could see staying out of range and waiting for an attack, or trapping or jamming the arm, or sidestepping and going in, but not just hanging out in that range waiting for him to attack...
 
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