Working out outside of the dojo

Discussion in 'Health Tips for the Martial Artist' started by Orion Nebula, Feb 12, 2019.

  1. jobo

    jobo Grandmaster

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    mines 22lbs, use him as a dumbbell for doing a bit of curling
     
  2. Monkey Turned Wolf

    Monkey Turned Wolf MT Moderator Staff Member

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    Ah. I knew something happened, just jumbled it up in my memory
     
  3. Orion Nebula

    Orion Nebula Green Belt

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    Yikes, I'm 50 years old :eek:

    Only 33, actually, which puts my max heart rate at 187 unless there's some new way of calculating it that I'm unaware of. My resting heart rate is around 65. So I'm not awe-inspiringly unfit, I'm just hauling a lot of mass around and it raises my heart rate when I go for a fairly leisurely walk. Not a very leisurely walk, mind you. Taking the dogs for a walk around my neighborhood with perfectly flat roads and I barely crack 100, but I leisurely walk in the woods with a little bit of varied terrain brings it up into the 115 range.
     
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  4. Dirty Dog

    Dirty Dog MT Senior Moderator Staff Member

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    Pay my airfare and I'll fetch it out.
     
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  5. _Simon_

    _Simon_ Senior Master

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    I... did not know that! Thought heel-to-toe was the safer and way to run! Wow, learn something new every day :)
     
  6. _Simon_

    _Simon_ Senior Master

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    That's awesome Bruce :) what a great bunch!
     
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  7. gpseymour

    gpseymour MT Moderator Staff Member

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    There are ways to control (partly, at least), but I'd have to see the actual study to know if they did. Sometimes the studies don't control for such things, and just acknowledge the weakness in their data for future follow-up.
     
  8. gpseymour

    gpseymour MT Moderator Staff Member

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    It's by far the most common, and how I learned when I started running. For a while I used "barefoot" style shoes to develop a forefoot/midfoot strike, and then went back to standard running shoes with that gait. Unfortunately, it was too late for my crappy knees.

    On a tangent, I never did figure out how to use a forefoot/midfoot strike on a significant downhill.
     
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  9. gpseymour

    gpseymour MT Moderator Staff Member

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  10. Monkey Turned Wolf

    Monkey Turned Wolf MT Moderator Staff Member

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    It's pretty simple actually. You take three steps purposely landing properly, then lean too far over to balance and topple down the hill.
     
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  11. drop bear

    drop bear Sr. Grandmaster

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  12. gpseymour

    gpseymour MT Moderator Staff Member

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    I didn't say he was overtraining. I was recommending a gradual ramp-up to avoid it.
     
  13. drop bear

    drop bear Sr. Grandmaster

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  14. gpseymour

    gpseymour MT Moderator Staff Member

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    Agreed. The key is to know how hard you can train. Which most folks won't know when they start.
     
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  15. drop bear

    drop bear Sr. Grandmaster

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    Most people can train harder than they think they can.
     
  16. gpseymour

    gpseymour MT Moderator Staff Member

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    Yes. And most people also still don't know where overtraining is. A ramped-up start is still best for avoiding injuries and overtraining. This is less true when there's a professional involved monitoring to prevent injuries and overtraining.
     
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  17. jobo

    jobo Grandmaster

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    theres no such thing as over training, just under recovery, when you've recovered you can train again, it doesn't need an expert to tell you when you've recovered, its blatantly obvious, actually injuring yourself is a slightly different thing that requested bad technique, carelessness or a certain level of stupidity to achieve, certainly once you've established any lever of fitness, someone who has spent 5 years sat on the couch is a bit different
     
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  18. gpseymour

    gpseymour MT Moderator Staff Member

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    In most cases, they are the same thing, simply stated from opposite sides. If someone wants to increase the frequency of exercise, they start running up against the limits of recovery. Overrun those limits, and you're over-training for the available recovery time.

    Of course, if you actually train so hard you injure yourself in a single session, I suppose that would be different from under-recovery, but that's not what we're talking about.
     
  19. JR 137

    JR 137 Grandmaster

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    With all this stuff, it’s hard to remember exactly what the question was in the first place. You should all be ashamed of yourselves. I’ve never sidetracked a single thread :)

    The best training thing to do outside the dojo is addressing whatever your weaknesses are. Some people need cardio, strength, flexibility, etc.

    My favorite thing is hitting the bag. It helps with practically everything - cardio, strength, coordination. The only thing it can’t do is get out of the way and punch me back. I focus on speed, power, footwork, pure technique, making combos flow better, and so on. A bag isn’t just for hitting it as hard as you can for as long as you can. IMO it’s the single best and most versatile piece of equipment a MAist can get.

    Running, biking and rowing are way too boring for me. They feel like a punishment because they’re so monotonous. And I never feel like I get a good workout; either my legs get tired before the test of me is tired, especially on a bike, or I get so sick of the same movement and feel like I spent all that time on nothing. Hitting a bag never bores me. I never just go through the motions like I end up doing whenever I’m doing other stuff.

    A bag’s versatility is basically limited by your imagination. There’s so many ways to work out with it.
     
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  20. gpseymour

    gpseymour MT Moderator Staff Member

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    I couldn't "like" and "funny" at the same time, and there's no "almost agree". So, I just opted to choose "funny" for the first sentence. I'm so ashamed of myself...I just normally never get sidetracked in a thread. :angelic:

    I agree with the basic premise, though: find something that doesn't bore you, and has many benefits. I do like working the bag, but have a hard time holding back. I often wear myself out earlier than I intend (my goal is usually 10 1-minute rounds). Rowing is my answer. Everybody (including the OP - see? right on topic!) has to figure out what that thing is, and then figure out where it fits into their fitness plan.123
     

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