What are your thoughts in this tutorial on the side kick by Scott Adkins?

Ivan

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For those that don't know, Scott Adkins is the actor for Yuri Boyka, "the most complete fighter in the world" ;)
I came across this tutorial while browsing YouTube
What interests me is his view on a subject matter I have been struggling with - to decide on whether it would be best to chamber my sidekick, or go with what was always my instinct, and flick it out from the ground directly.
Personally, I have come to the conclusion, that both variants are good but either have their expertise. For body shots such as the gut, or the solar plexus, a direct chambered kick (in my opinion) would do much more damage. In contrast, for a kick to the head, I would say that Scott Adkins' "uppercut" sidekick, would be more efficient.
 

CB Jones

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Not sure about the crossing of the feet as you come forward....seems like that could be problematic in a fight.
 

Flying Crane

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Ive not watched the video.

Regarding your comment about chambering vs. flicking the kick directly up from the ground. When I was young and learning this stuff, I loved the side kick. I was of the belief that I was doing a chamber and thrust.

Then I bought a heavy bag and hung it up in the basement. I quickly discovered my error. When I landed my side kick on the bag, it hurt in the ankle, the knee, and the hip. Because I was not giving it a good chamber and was instead doing something closer to flicking it up from the ground.

That taught me a lot, and with the bag I was able to better work out the proper chamber and thrust motion. It no longer hurt me to land my side kick.

My vote goes with giving it a good chamber and thrust.
 

Buka

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There's a lot of different ways to throw sidekicks, with chambering, without, and some variables in between the two. Advancing you can cross behind as was shown in the vid, cross in front or bringing the feet together - lead foot moving as the rear is closing, there's various types of what we call "hopping sidekick" which are nasty strong IF you land it. But, of course, that IF goes for anything you throw.

There's jump side kicks, fall away side kicks, drop sidekicks.....sidekicks are kind of like Bubba telling Forest Gump about cooking shrimp dishes.

As much as I loved offensive side kicks, a good defensive side kick was always useful. And it doesn't matter how fast you are, just that you have good timing. So you can catch them...

SidekicksetUp.jpg


....in mid step.

SideKick.jpg


Side kicks. They're what's for dinner.
 

drop bear

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Chambering gives you more room for error. So if they are not at a perfect distance you can still hit them with the kick.

His theory makes sense as well to keep momentum.
 

skribs

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Not sure about the crossing of the feet as you come forward....seems like that could be problematic in a fight.

Not done at speed. This is one of the basic movements of Taekwondo, the step-behind side kick (and later step-behind hook kick).

It's only problematic if you stand there, and if someone pushes you and you're too uncoordinated to step when they push you.
 

skribs

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For those that don't know, Scott Adkins is the actor for Yuri Boyka, "the most complete fighter in the world" ;)
I came across this tutorial while browsing YouTube
What interests me is his view on a subject matter I have been struggling with - to decide on whether it would be best to chamber my sidekick, or go with what was always my instinct, and flick it out from the ground directly.
Personally, I have come to the conclusion, that both variants are good but either have their expertise. For body shots such as the gut, or the solar plexus, a direct chambered kick (in my opinion) would do much more damage. In contrast, for a kick to the head, I would say that Scott Adkins' "uppercut" sidekick, would be more efficient.

The thing about the chambered kick that he's missing is the chamber helps bring the kick in line with your center of mass. However, his version is faster, and it works well with that upward momentum.

Tomorrow I'll try both kicks on my StrikeMeter and see. However, I don't think it reads upward strikes as well, and it's only measuring impact (not total force or momentum).
 

drop bear

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Not sure about the crossing of the feet as you come forward....seems like that could be problematic in a fight.

I basically only throw a side kick off a failed round kick. So where he starts is the position I will basically land. And have to recover from.

So from that perspective it flows pretty well

 

Buka

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Side kicks really need to be trained against people who can fight. The bag work, shield work, partner work, Kata work, whatever, is all fine and good. But it has to be tested against resistance.

I also believe the groin as a target area should be in all training that includes kicking. You know why?

If you have a full length mirror in your house.....after you take a shower someday, position yourself in front of the mirror and throw some high kicks.
 

Flying Crane

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I also believe the groin as a target area should be in all training that includes kicking. You know why?

If you have a full length mirror in your house.....after you take a shower someday, position yourself in front of the mirror and throw some high kicks.
Thats my favorite way to start any day.
 

isshinryuronin

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Just a couple of comments on the video. In the first example, he is lifting the knee up to chamber so the foot is at least knee high before the kick starts, resulting in the kick being delivered more horizontally than starting the kick from the ground which takes a more diagonal angle. This difference in the line of attack means the defense will probably need to be different. I think that using both methods would cause a lot of confusion for the opponent as it introduces another variable for him to deal with aside from what the intended target is.

Consider the jab. Some boxers throw it straight in from the basic guard, some throw it with the hand down by the hip, some throw it from the left or right of the center line. A boxer that throws it from all these angles will give his opponent a very hard time.

While all angles are good, I think a side kick chambered with the foot at least knee high, and a stiff straight in jab deliver the most power as the body mass is more behind the strike.
 

skribs

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I tested it out on my StrikeMeter. (If you haven't read my other threads, it's a meter that provides an arbitrary number to compare the impact force of one strike to another).

Step-behind side kick: 1500-1600
Step-behind back kick (Adkin's version) 1400-1500

The meter doesn't measure the pushing power, which was way higher with the traditional side kick. However, his version is faster, and in my opinion represents a good trade-off of speed for power.
 

dvcochran

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For those that don't know, Scott Adkins is the actor for Yuri Boyka, "the most complete fighter in the world" ;)
I came across this tutorial while browsing YouTube
What interests me is his view on a subject matter I have been struggling with - to decide on whether it would be best to chamber my sidekick, or go with what was always my instinct, and flick it out from the ground directly.
Personally, I have come to the conclusion, that both variants are good but either have their expertise. For body shots such as the gut, or the solar plexus, a direct chambered kick (in my opinion) would do much more damage. In contrast, for a kick to the head, I would say that Scott Adkins' "uppercut" sidekick, would be more efficient.

It is a 'tool bag' idea to me. The more kick/strike options and variables you have the better.
A flick has it place such as to jam or get the opponent on guard as a setup, but I don't think anyone's flick is going to have the power of a good, chambered kick regardless of the type of kick. For most, it requires a Lot of practice and stretching to get the same speed with a chambered kick.

The step behind like shown in the video is smoother and less obvious than most people skipping kick because the skip step motion requires so much upper body movement that is gives the kick away. If you notice, he is flexible and smooth enough to Not turn his upper body making it harder to see what is coming. Plus, most people can cover more distance with the step behind kick.
 

dvcochran

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I basically only throw a side kick off a failed round kick. So where he starts is the position I will basically land. And have to recover from.

So from that perspective it flows pretty well

Your video and description is probably the most widely used kicking combo out there, from beginners to advanced.
So the first video is just one example of One of the kicks a person may use in a combo. It can be used as a single kick but the success rate is proportional to the opponents/attackers skills and the kickers prowess.
 
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Ivan

Ivan

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Not done at speed. This is one of the basic movements of Taekwondo, the step-behind side kick (and later step-behind hook kick).

It's only problematic if you stand there, and if someone pushes you and you're too uncoordinated to step when they push you.
Taekwondo is known for using unbalanced positions to prioritise speed
 

skribs

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Taekwondo is known for using unbalanced positions to prioritise speed

And when you're moving faster it's harder to capitalize on.

Plus, we practice our balance. The fear most people have is that if you get pushed, you'll trip over your crossed leg. Except if I get pushed, I'll either pivot (which uncrosses the leg) or I'll step back with that leg (which uncrosses that leg). It's only a problem if you stand still in the crossed position, and don't know how to react to being pushed.
 

punisher73

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Not sure about the crossing of the feet as you come forward....seems like that could be problematic in a fight.

In this video, he is showing the mechanics of the kick. A front or rear crossover step is used to close the gap/distance if needed. It would also be used in conjunction with your hands and other body movement to hide the step for the split second you step. You won't be standing like that. For example, due to the side position, you may see a lead backfist used to set the distance and keep them focused on your upperbody.
 

Headhunter

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Not done at speed. This is one of the basic movements of Taekwondo, the step-behind side kick (and later step-behind hook kick).

It's only problematic if you stand there, and if someone pushes you and you're too uncoordinated to step when they push you.
Yep it's a basic karate technique and I've used it multiple times in general sparring, point karate, kickboxing, Muay Thai and Mma and never had an issue with it causing me to lose balance
 

Wing Woo Gar

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For those that don't know, Scott Adkins is the actor for Yuri Boyka, "the most complete fighter in the world" ;)
I came across this tutorial while browsing YouTube
What interests me is his view on a subject matter I have been struggling with - to decide on whether it would be best to chamber my sidekick, or go with what was always my instinct, and flick it out from the ground directly.
Personally, I have come to the conclusion, that both variants are good but either have their expertise. For body shots such as the gut, or the solar plexus, a direct chambered kick (in my opinion) would do much more damage. In contrast, for a kick to the head, I would say that Scott Adkins' "uppercut" sidekick, would be more efficient.
There's a lot of different ways to throw sidekicks, with chambering, without, and some variables in between the two. Advancing you can cross behind as was shown in the vid, cross in front or bringing the feet together - lead foot moving as the rear is closing, there's various types of what we call "hopping sidekick" which are nasty strong IF you land it. But, of course, that IF goes for anything you throw.

There's jump side kicks, fall away side kicks, drop sidekicks.....sidekicks are kind of like Bubba telling Forest Gump about cooking shrimp dishes.

As much as I loved offensive side kicks, a good defensive side kick was always useful. And it doesn't matter how fast you are, just that you have good timing. So you can catch them...

View attachment 22831

....in mid step.

View attachment 22832

Side kicks. They're what's for dinner.
in my experience, people tend to Telegraph these kicks. An easy way to get inside.
 

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