Toes breaking more than is normal?

rozow

White Belt
Joined
Jun 29, 2022
Messages
1
Reaction score
0
Hi guys,

I recently started training Brazilian jiu-jitsu after ten years training karate/mma.

In the last 4 weeks at jui juitsu Iv managed to break 2 toes, the little one on one foot and the middle one on the other.

In my ten years of karate we have rolled a lot and Iv only broken a toe once, so I'm wondering if this is unusual?

I am a bodybuilder and powerlifter as well and I have heard excess protein and caffeine intake can result in brittle bones but I wasn't sure if this holds any truth?



Anyway, I can live with broken toes, Iv continued my training, lifting etc. but I'm just curious if this is normal for bjj practitioners or if I might want to investigate it.

Thanks! ??
 

Monkey Turned Wolf

MT Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Jan 4, 2012
Messages
10,193
Reaction score
4,132
Location
New York
Not normal in my experience. Haven't broken a toe and can't remember any of the people i train with breaking one either (though it's possible I've forgotten).

Is anyone else in your dojo breaking toes or is it just you?
 

Tony Dismukes

MT Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Nov 11, 2005
Messages
6,490
Reaction score
5,560
Location
Lexington, KY
That's not normal at all. I've been training BJJ for 22 years. I've never come close to breaking a toe and I've never witnessed anyone else breaking one. I have some vague memory that I might have heard about someone breaking a toe once, but that's about it. If you've broken two different toes in one month, then I would be concerned that either you are doing something wrong or that you have some sort of pre-existing condition which should be checked out.

It's also possible that you just had the remarkably bad luck to have two unlikely accidents in a row, but I would take the time to investigate in case it's more than that.
 

JowGaWolf

Sr. Grandmaster
MT Mentor
Joined
Aug 3, 2015
Messages
11,685
Reaction score
4,344
Accidental bone breaking isn't normal. There may be a structural weakness in the bone. My pinky finger has a hollow bone so, if I'm not careful enough then I'll break it. One day I'll get it fixed. I just don't know when. I can't imagine having a hollow bone being a good thing as I age.
 

Buka

Sr. Grandmaster
MT Mentor
Joined
Jun 27, 2011
Messages
12,137
Reaction score
9,067
Location
Maui
Welcome to MartialTalk, Rozow.

I've broken a few toes over the years, but from hitting elbows while hard kicking. Never broke one grappling, though.

Maybe ask your instructor or some of the high belts there.
 

Damien

Blue Belt
Joined
Mar 17, 2021
Messages
201
Reaction score
161
Location
Sydney
I am a bodybuilder and powerlifter as well and I have heard excess protein and caffeine intake can result in brittle bones but I wasn't sure if this holds any truth?
This is definitely not true. There are lots of claims about excess protein consumption being bad for you, it's all BS. The only downside to eating more than your needs are you waste money (protein sources are generally expensive), you may under eat on other macros if you maintain a calorie balance, and you're digestion might suffer a bit. It's not going to do any long term damage though.

As for caffeine, I haven't looked at extensive research on its consumption, but there are people out there that drink a litres of coffee a day, and they're not walking around like they are made of glass. I can't imagine what the mechanism for caffeine reducing bone elasticity would be either, so likely also not true.

I hope you don't suffer any more injuries!
 

Dirty Dog

MT Senior Moderator
Staff member
Lifetime Supporting Member
Joined
Sep 3, 2009
Messages
20,341
Reaction score
6,844
Location
Pueblo West, CO
This is definitely not true. There are lots of claims about excess protein consumption being bad for you, it's all BS.






Looks like people with actual knowledge disagree with your statement.
 

JowGaWolf

Sr. Grandmaster
MT Mentor
Joined
Aug 3, 2015
Messages
11,685
Reaction score
4,344






Looks like people with actual knowledge disagree with your statement.
Good thing my body rejects high protein.
 

Damien

Blue Belt
Joined
Mar 17, 2021
Messages
201
Reaction score
161
Location
Sydney






Looks like people with actual knowledge disagree with your statement.
It is indeed a very common claim that excess protein consumption causes problems with kidneys. This is one of those findings that gets taken completely out of context and blown out of all proportion.

If you have some form of kidney problem, then consuming large amounts of protein can be bad for you. If you have normal functioning kidneys however there is no problem; this has been demonstrated time and again by scientific studies looking into high protein diets.

If you actually read the abstracts of the top three links you posted which are scientific papers, you will see that they say in the context of those with diseased kidneys or at high risk of kidney disease. If you are going to cite evidence, you need to actually look at it first, this is how claims like this gain legs in the first place. To paraphrase, it looks like people who actually know how to read scientific papers disagree with your statement.

It's a bit like sugar. It's not inherently bad for you. Such statements assume you are healthy. If you've got diabetes, you need to be more aware of what you consume.

Fat is not inherently bad for you. If you have digestive issues, you need to be more aware of what you consume.
 

MR. SERNA

Yellow Belt
Joined
May 14, 2022
Messages
29
Reaction score
3
Hi guys,

I recently started training Brazilian jiu-jitsu after ten years training karate/mma.

In the last 4 weeks at jui juitsu Iv managed to break 2 toes, the little one on one foot and the middle one on the other.

In my ten years of karate we have rolled a lot and Iv only broken a toe once, so I'm wondering if this is unusual?

I am a bodybuilder and powerlifter as well and I have heard excess protein and caffeine intake can result in brittle bones but I wasn't sure if this holds any truth?



Anyway, I can live with broken toes, Iv continued my training, lifting etc. but I'm just curious if this is normal for bjj practitioners or if I might want to investigate it.

Thanks! ??
When I trained Brazilian jiu-jitsu, I began wrapping my toes. Later I wore my kung-fu slippers to protect my feet. My instructor didn't have a problem with my shoes to protect my feet. As I was training and I had no intention of competing outside the school.

Mr. Serna
 

Gyakuto

Purple Belt
Joined
Nov 21, 2020
Messages
395
Reaction score
310
Location
UK
When you say broken are the phalanges actually fractured or rather, dislocated?

If its the former, then you might want ask a medical practitioner to look at your blood calcium /calcitonin levels. Perhaps even a bone density assessment might be in order.

If theyre dislocated then you may want to look at how you position your feet/toes as you roll around on the floor.
 

geezer

Grandmaster
MT Mentor
Joined
Oct 20, 2007
Messages
7,068
Reaction score
3,159
Location
Phoenix, AZ
When I trained Brazilian jiu-jitsu, I began wrapping my toes. Later I wore my kung-fu slippers to protect my feet. My instructor didn't have a problem with my shoes to protect my feet. As I was training and I had no intention of competing outside the school.

Mr. Serna
Is it common for BJJ instructors to allow appropriate shoes on the mat? I thought you had to train barefoot.

One of the reasons I never tried BJJ was that I have seriously messed up feet, fused ankles and super stiff-jointed toes that have a very limited range of movement. If I'd thought they might let me train with my wrestling shoes I would have had one less excuse!
 

Monkey Turned Wolf

MT Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Jan 4, 2012
Messages
10,193
Reaction score
4,132
Location
New York
Is it common for BJJ instructors to allow appropriate shoes on the mat? I thought you had to train barefoot.

One of the reasons I never tried BJJ was that I have seriously messed up feet, fused ankles and super stiff-jointed toes that have a very limited range of movement. If I'd thought they might let me train with my wrestling shoes I would have had one less excuse!
I've seen people at my dojo use grappling shoes. Look pretty similar to the wrestling variety-not everyone is willing to risk rugburn on their feet when they could prevent it
 

MR. SERNA

Yellow Belt
Joined
May 14, 2022
Messages
29
Reaction score
3
Is it common for BJJ instructors to allow appropriate shoes on the mat? I thought you had to train barefoot.

One of the reasons I never tried BJJ was that I have seriously messed up feet, fused ankles and super stiff-jointed toes that have a very limited range of movement. If I'd thought they might let me train with my wrestling shoes I would have had one less excuse!
I understand how feet problems can effect your training.

Mr. Serna
 

Tony Dismukes

MT Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Nov 11, 2005
Messages
6,490
Reaction score
5,560
Location
Lexington, KY
Is it common for BJJ instructors to allow appropriate shoes on the mat? I thought you had to train barefoot.

One of the reasons I never tried BJJ was that I have seriously messed up feet, fused ankles and super stiff-jointed toes that have a very limited range of movement. If I'd thought they might let me train with my wrestling shoes I would have had one less excuse!
Depends on the school. Some places will allow dedicated wrestling shoes that you only wear on the mat.
 

MR. SERNA

Yellow Belt
Joined
May 14, 2022
Messages
29
Reaction score
3
Depends on the school. Some places will allow dedicated wrestling shoes that you only wear on the mat.
Yes, the shoes I wore were dedicated slippers made of kid leather with a cotton sole. They were tight fitting and formed to my feet. I only wore them at school never anywhere else.

I take great care of my feet. My front kicks using the ball of foot, side kick utilizing the edge of my heel. Back kicks I use the heel of my foot. I use the arch of my foot for spinning side kick or inside kicks. The only time the toe is used is in the rear high kick to the throat.

When kicking the groin we kicked the taint area with the ball of the foot or heel from behind. Driving energy into the lower body cavity attacking the organs inside. The testicular attack requires the arch of the foot.

My respect fo my BJJ practitioners, who are highly skilled with foot techniques I believe saved me from injury.

Mr. Serna
 

jks9199

Administrator
Staff member
Lifetime Supporting Member
Joined
Jul 2, 2006
Messages
22,670
Reaction score
2,922
Location
Northern VA
Might be important to look at how they're breaking... Most of the broken toes I've heard of in wrestling, bjj, and similar activities are the result of toes getting caught in gaps or holes on the mats, or getting caught in weird positions and basically rolled over -- with a huge bias towards the former.
 

Steve

Mostly Harmless
Joined
Jul 9, 2008
Messages
20,418
Reaction score
5,919
Location
Covington, WA
Does your school train on harder judo style mats or softer wrestling mats? I broke my little toes several times before my school purchased better mats. They looks like little Vienna sausages now they been broken so many times.
 

Latest Discussions

Top