Not really a beginner, but I guess this is still the right place to ask.

Cyberserker

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I was originally trained by a 2 time national champion. I won a few smaller tournaments myself. But that was a long long time ago. But I've been watching Cobra Kai And Johhny inspired me to get my fat, middle-aged butt back into it. I used to be able to kick above my head, but now I can barely kick waist high without hurting myself. I also have nowhere near the stamina I used to.

So here's my question. If I get back into classes and try to get my second black belt in whatever, that's literally going to kill me at this point. Obviously I should start doing my stretches again, but what else can I do to try to get back into good enough shape for classes? I'm broke and can't afford both class and a gym, so it has to be stuff I can do at home. Can anyone recommend some exercises? Especially anything that helps endurance. I'm not going to go to some joke of a McDojo and I know I can't make it through class in my current condition.

Wish I could just 80's training montage this, but unfortunately I think I need actual advice at this point.
 
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Gyakuto

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I think the number one thing you can do is lose weight and get back to a normal body mass. Concurrent power walking/jogging and a good general stretching routine and in say, 6 months, youll be in good shape for training in martial arts. Change does take longer as you get older, so be prepared for that!
 

hoshin1600

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If you've done martial arts before I would advise to do any kata that you might know . There are muscles all over the body that need some tuning up and jumping into a class would shock those muscles. Doing kata before you start will help in those first few weeks of your classes to prevent unnecessary soreness.
 

Monkey Turned Wolf

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Martial arts are a great way to get in shape to begin with. Unless there's a medical issue, no harm in starting out class to help you with that-just know your limits and don't be ashamed to take a break if needed.
 

Yokozuna514

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I was originally trained by a 2 time national champion. I won a few smaller tournaments myself. But that was a long long time ago. But I've been watching Cobra Kai And Johhny inspired me to get my fat, middle-aged butt back into it. I used to be able to kick above my head, but now I can barely kick waist high without hurting myself. I also have nowhere near the stamina I used to.

So here's my question. If I get back into classes and try to get my second black belt in whatever, that's literally going to kill me at this point. Obviously I should start doing my stretches again, but what else can I do to try to get back into good enough shape for classes? I'm broke and can't afford both class and a gym, so it has to be stuff I can do at home. Can anyone recommend some exercises? Especially anything that helps endurance. I'm not going to go to some joke of a McDojo and I know I can't make it through class in my current condition.

Wish I could just 80's training montage this, but unfortunately I think I need actual advice at this point.
It's not common to meet any middle aged people that haven't done anything in their life but that was then and this is now. The best advice I can give is to find a place you want to train at and just go to class. Any good dojo will get you back into shape and will make sure you do so without injuring yourself in the process.
 
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I think the number one thing you can do is lose weight and get back to a normal body mass. Concurrent power walking/jogging and a good general stretching routine and in say, 6 months, youll be in good shape for training in martial arts. Change does take longer as you get older, so be prepared for that!
Yeah that'll definitely happen once I start working out again, and I agree. Just looking for advice since my normal methods of doing so aren't practical anymore due to either age or financial status. If I could still afford to go on rock climbing trips it I wouldn't have gained the weight to begin with. I'm just looking for execercises I can do at home to prepare, aside from the obvious pushups/situps/squats everyone learned in gym class.
 
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Cyberserker

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It's not common to meet any middle aged people that haven't done anything in their life but that was then and this is now. The best advice I can give is to find a place you want to train at and just go to class. Any good dojo will get you back into shape and will make sure you do so without injuring yourself in the process.
Nah man. When I was in shape I left class out of breath, sore and sweaty, and that's when I was in vastly better shape. If I just jump into it now I'll be in a wheel chair by the end of the week. I'm not looking some some McDojo that'll take it easy on me. I'm looking for advice on training without a gym membership, which I haven't done before. This is going to need some prep. I can't just jump back in like I haven't spent decades behind a desk. I'm literally just looking for physical training advice.
 

Monkey Turned Wolf

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Nah man. When I was in shape I left class out of breath, sore and sweaty, and that's when I was in vastly better shape. If I just jump into it now I'll be in a wheel chair by the end of the week. I'm not looking some some McDojo that'll take it easy on me. I'm looking for advice on training without a gym membership, which I haven't done before. This is going to need some prep. I can't just jump back in like I haven't spent decades behind a desk. I'm literally just looking for physical training advice.
This is called pacing yourself. Recognizing when you need your own breaks and building yourself up. There's no reason that you have to do that somewhere outside of a dojo, and it's expected that this will have to happen when anyone new enters the dojo.
 
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You don't get in better shape so you can go to class. You go to class to get in better shape.
Normally I'd agree, but I'm a 41 year old fat guy who can barely do 4 pushups. I literally won't live through any legitimate class. I wouldn't be asking if it wasn't necessary. If I just moved back and jumped back into my old class and picked up where I left off I'd drop dead of a heart attack in 2 hours. I gotta drop a few of these double whoppers first. Does nobody train anymore?
 
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This is called pacing yourself. Recognizing when you need your own breaks and building yourself up. There's no reason that you have to do that somewhere outside of a dojo, and it's expected that this will have to happen when anyone new enters the dojo.

I don't know if you guys are fully getting me here. I'd literally spend more time resting than learning. Not my first rodeo. I know what's involved. Until I'm in better shape it's seriously a waste of money. I'm actually just looking for martial arts oriented home exercises I can do that are oriented around specifically what my body will need in order to get back in practice.. Nothing more. Like I said in another post, does nobody even train anymore? I'm looking for endurance training advice. Not one reply about training.
 

Monkey Turned Wolf

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I don't know if you guys are fully getting me here. I'd literally spend more time resting than learning. Not my first rodeo. I know what's involved. Until I'm in better shape it's seriously a waste of money. I'm actually just looking for martial arts oriented home exercises I can do that are oriented around specifically what my body will need in order to get back in practice.. Nothing more. Like I said in another post, does nobody even train anymore? I'm looking for endurance training advice. Not one reply about training.
My point was more that you shouldn't delay going to train because you're out of shape, not that you shouldn't also get in shape outside. I still recommend you start training as soon as you can afford it, if that's your goal, but if you're looking to get into shape at home, there are a couple of things that I'd recommend.

1. Jump rope. Can be really good cardio, you can choose your own pace, and the number of reps, and compare those reps day by day easier than running. Also doesn't take a whole lot of space and you can do it in the comfort of your own backyard (or inside if you've got the ceiling for it, or park if you don't have a backyard).

2. For less endurance focus but general strength training, check out convict conditioning. There's a book with the exercises, I'm sure you could find a free pdf of it with very little digging, but as a moderator, I do not recommend that. It's useful for general strength training exercises, again has ways to measure your progress and body progression as you get stronger (also has options for those who are not in shape at all to start at stage 0), and gets most of the needed muscle groups.

3. Couch to 5k app. It's an app (available on android and iPhone) intended to get anyone from not exercising at all to be able to run a 5k within 9 weeks. Works for those that stick with it, barring medical issues they may have.

4. If you're a nerd like me, check out Workout Database. It provides workouts that would 'fit' specific superheroes. For instance, the blob is an x-men villain that is pretty fat but strong, like the original strongmen. His workout involves 4days per week of pretty much just strongman workouts: deadlifts, pushups, things like that, 2 rest days, and 1 "active" day doing a non-specific sporting activity, which is useful if you want to get strong, but not to just get in fighting-shape on its own. Meanwhile, the green arrow has a workout much more appropriate to martial arts, with calisthenics, endurance training, and muscle-building that gets all the main muscle groups. The only thing is that can be a tough workout for a beginner. They've also got diet options, but last I checked you've got to pay for that.

I've done a few of these because I get bored of workouts if they get too monotonous, and would recommend the captain America one if you've got the materials needed, and the echizen ryoma one if you don't. The echizen ryoma one is tennis based but does a pretty good job for other purposes as well.

5. If you've got a school or stadium you can go into free that has bleachers, running up and down stairs is an amazing way to build up cardio. If you don't, running up and down a hill (or doing things like a bear walk up the hill and sprinting down) is a good alternative. Then switch off between sprints and walking once you're done.

6. Lastly, look into HIIT. These are tougher workouts, involving a lot of intense aerobic activity followed by resting and repeating. These can be tough to stay motivated for, but are good at getting you in-shape while requiring less time during the day, and less days to improve your fitness level as well. Here's a link to a list of different-timed HIIT workouts I found, but unlike everything else on this list I have not tried this specific list so can't give you any recommendations.
 

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Normally I'd agree, but I'm a 41 year old fat guy who can barely do 4 pushups. I literally won't live through any legitimate class. I wouldn't be asking if it wasn't necessary. If I just moved back and jumped back into my old class and picked up where I left off I'd drop dead of a heart attack in 2 hours. I gotta drop a few of these double whoppers first. Does nobody train anymore?
You should still agree. Go train. Do as much as you can. Next class, do more.

It's easy to find excuses not to train.
 

Monkey Turned Wolf

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Normally I'd agree, but I'm a 41 year old fat guy who can barely do 4 pushups. I literally won't live through any legitimate class. I wouldn't be asking if it wasn't necessary. If I just moved back and jumped back into my old class and picked up where I left off I'd drop dead of a heart attack in 2 hours. I gotta drop a few of these double whoppers first. Does nobody train anymore?
I read this after my other post I'd recommend starting off with #2 and 3 on my list-convict conditioning and couch to 5k. They're both structured and progressive so you can start somewhere meaningful and actually improve. After that, move into something like this workout: Ryoma Echizen Workout: Train like The Prince of Tennis!

But again-that's on top of training in a dojo. You don't have to pick up where you left off to go to class. I've been in classes where new people can't get through the warm-up and need to take breaks, then same throughout any grappling or sparring that occurs. Then they work on the side learning the basics from an instructor/assistant instructor which means they're expending less 'effort' (more mental of remembering things and learning why things are done). No one judges them, and they've all lived through it.
 

wab25

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You would not be the first, nor the last, out of shape and over weight person to restart training again. I second the suggestion of going back to class. Sure you may do a lot of resting... but you will be seeing what they do. Now, you can do that at home as well. The best way to get into shape for doing a particular art... is by doing that art. Yes... pace yourself... but get in there and train. Then train more at home, using the same things you did in class.
 

Monkey Turned Wolf

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I read this after my other post I'd recommend starting off with #2 and 3 on my list-convict conditioning and couch to 5k. They're both structured and progressive so you can start somewhere meaningful and actually improve. After that, move into something like this workout: Ryoma Echizen Workout: Train like The Prince of Tennis!

But again-that's on top of training in a dojo. You don't have to pick up where you left off to go to class. I've been in classes where new people can't get through the warm-up and need to take breaks, then same throughout any grappling or sparring that occurs. Then they work on the side learning the basics from an instructor/assistant instructor which means they're expending less 'effort' (more mental of remembering things and learning why things are done). No one judges them, and they've all lived through it.
@Cyberserker I just remembered a fun routine I did in college with friends-we'd compete who could go the longest but that's not necessary. You take a deck of cards, and assign each suit a different exercise (ie: Pushups, situps, squats, mountain climbers). For you I'd recommend adapted versions of them (look into convict conditioning to find good adapted versions. Then you shuffle the deck, pull out a card, and do x amount of the exercise of the suit. so if I pull a 3 of spades, I'd have to do 3 pushups, then if I pulled a jack of clubs, 11 situps. Figure out beforehand how many cards you want to do, and do whatever it says until you reach that.
I'd recommend somewhere between 5 and 10 cards to start, and twice a day. As you get more in shape, change the number of cards you pull, and if needed change the exercises. So for instance, if I was doing that and found that my cardio was lacking, I might replace squats with jumping jacks. Other good ones to include would be pull-ups (again find an easier version in convict-conditioning book to build up to pull-ups), tricep dips, lunges, and shiko.
 

isshinryuronin

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Aside from basic strength and cardio exercises (6 count burpees are great for both) and stretching, wab25 has the right idea. Do these at home along with basic technique reps for a month or two (starting slow and easy, gradually working up), then get to a dojo. Oh yeah, work on dieting at the same time.
 

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Nah man. When I was in shape I left class out of breath, sore and sweaty, and that's when I was in vastly better shape. If I just jump into it now I'll be in a wheel chair by the end of the week.
Nah. Just go to a school in the same or similar style that you trained in before. Unless they're a babysitting school, they have plenty of experience with middle-age folks wanting to start or get back into martial arts for health and recreation. They'll be able to work with you and set it to your pace. You'll be fine.

Are you sure you're worried about it being too physically intensive? Or are you more worried about being embarrassed? I see that too sometimes. But the fact is no one cares if you can't do what you once could. You'll probably start at white belt anyway.

Just do it.

Peace favor your sword,
Kirk
 

lklawson

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Normally I'd agree, but I'm a 41 year old fat guy who can barely do 4 pushups. I literally won't live through any legitimate class. I wouldn't be asking if it wasn't necessary. If I just moved back and jumped back into my old class and picked up where I left off I'd drop dead of a heart attack in 2 hours. I gotta drop a few of these double whoppers first. Does nobody train anymore?
Mule muffins.

You won't be able to perform like you did when you were 21 but no one expects you to. Honestly.

Don't worry about how you'll look. Just go train. Any 1/4-the-way-decent school will work with your current ability and try to work you up to something better, just like going to a gym.

Peace favor your sword,
Kirk
 

Steve

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It sounds like you already know what you need to do. Get some exercise, lose some weight, focus on cardio. It's not rocket science.

Probably a good idea to start by getting a physical and talking to your doctor.
 
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