TKD instructors saves Texas woman from sexual assault

By utilizing their training and discipline, (they managed to stop the assault and hold him), Sheriff Ed Gonzalez said in a series of posts on X.

It seems credit for stopping the assault was given to the famliy. Martial arts can be displayed in many different ways other than "punch, kick, block. Stopping the attack without anyone being inured is commendable and takes a vast amount of training to accomplish this.....
 

I am all for bagging out TKD. But it is funnier when you make sure you are right.

I also have no idea why everyone else danced around that for so long. I mean it was pretty easy to find
Yeah, except it didn't go down like it did in the video. They pulled the man off of the woman and held him down to the ground, in a way that anyone could have done, unlike the knife defense techniques in the video. Nobody's bagging on TKD. I'm just saying TKD wasn't used.
 
Stopping the attack without anyone being inured is commendable and takes a vast amount of training to accomplish this.....
If I were to claim that the majority of assaults, sexual or otherwise, that were stopped by others were stopped by people who are untrained, would you bet money against me?
 
Training someone in Martial Arts is not a matter of teaching techniques that fit into particular box, like the proper word fitting in a crossword puzzle.

You teach them to think, to use their body in different ways that can be adapted to different things. All it takes is hard work and time.
 
Training someone in Martial Arts is not a matter of teaching techniques that fit into particular box, like the proper word fitting in a crossword puzzle.

You teach them to think, to use their body in different ways that can be adapted to different things. All it takes is hard work and time.
Let's grant you that, for the sake of argument.

If the TKD training is what made them either willing or able to act, then does that mean that without the training they would have turned a blind eye to what was going on? Or that if they tried, they would have been unsuccessful?
 
Let's grant you that, for the sake of argument.

If the TKD training is what made them either willing or able to act, then does that mean that without the training they would have turned a blind eye to what was going on? Or that if they tried, they would have been unsuccessful?

I have no idea.
 
Yeah, except it didn't go down like it did in the video. They pulled the man off of the woman and held him down to the ground, in a way that anyone could have done, unlike the knife defense techniques in the video. Nobody's bagging on TKD. I'm just saying TKD wasn't used.
Neck ride for ten minutes?
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Although that other video they were doing arm bars and triangle chokes.

So there is a bit more grappling in the TKD than there used to be.
 
Training someone in Martial Arts is not a matter of teaching techniques that fit into particular box, like the proper word fitting in a crossword puzzle.

You teach them to think, to use their body in different ways that can be adapted to different things. All it takes is hard work and time.

Yeah. People forget what is and isn't part of a system is literally made up.
 
Yeah. People forget what is and isn't part of a system is literally made up.

True, it is.

And to your post before that one, thank goodness theres more grappling in most styles than there used to be. Its like cooking your whole life with no basic spices available. Then you get some and think, Hey, this is pretty good stuff, I think Im going to use this.

As to that knife defense video. I used to do all of those. Even used to teach some of them.
I thank God none of my students back then ever had to use them, they would have gotten killed ugly.
 
theres more grappling in most styles than there used to be
Yes, but before "there used to be" there was more grappling. More grappling > less grappling > more grappling. The old ways are being rediscovered, mostly thru kata and historical references. A number of TMA styles/schools, however, never lost this application over the decades. Nice to see this original concept of karate being revived.
 
Yes, but before "there used to be" there was more grappling. More grappling > less grappling > more grappling. The old ways are being rediscovered, mostly thru kata and historical references. A number of TMA styles/schools, however, never lost this application over the decades. Nice to see this original concept of karate being revived.
Yeah. Because there wasn't 3,000 years of wrestling.
 
If I were to claim that the majority of assaults, sexual or otherwise, that were stopped by others were stopped by people who are untrained, would you bet money against me?
No,
But, it's not for us to debate.

The statement below, from a credible source, speaks for itself.
('The Harris County Sheriffs Department has credited An and his family with saving the young woman from a sexual assault.')

(By utilizing their training and discipline, they managed to stop the assault and hold him, Sheriff Ed Gonzalez said in a series of posts on X.)

The original post was placed to show that Martial Arts is much more then a means of hurting someone but can be applied in such a way as to control a situation.......
 
they managed to stop the assault and hold him,
Ans father, Hong, yanked the attacker away by his shirt and pinned him to the ground. ... An and his brother helped subdue the attacker.

It takes 3 trained MA persons to control 1 untrained person. Something must be wrong in this picture.

In school, you train "1 against many" and not the other way around.

Of course, what they did was a noble thing. But in MA, many against 1 is considered as "unfair fight".
 
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Ans father, Hong, yanked the attacker away by his shirt and pinned him to the ground. ... An and his brother helped subdue the attacker.

It takes 3 trained MA persons to control 1 untrained person. Something must be wrong in this picture.

In school, you train "1 against many" and not the other way around.

Of course, what they did was a noble thing. But in MA, many against 1 is considered as "un

Ans father, Hong, yanked the attacker away by his shirt and pinned him to the ground. ... An and his brother helped subdue the attacker.

It takes 3 trained MA persons to control 1 untrained person. Something must be wrong in this picture.

In school, you train "1 against many" and not the other way around.

Of course, what they did was a noble thing. But in MA, many against 1 is considered as "unfair fight".
Perhaps it was a martial arts school that wasn't trained very well but regardless of how many it took they got the job done and everyone was safe.... win-win.
 
Ans father, Hong, yanked the attacker away by his shirt and pinned him to the ground. ... An and his brother helped subdue the attacker.

It takes 3 trained MA persons to control 1 untrained person. Something must be wrong in this picture.

In school, you train "1 against many" and not the other way around.

Of course, what they did was a noble thing. But in MA, many against 1 is considered as "unfair fight".
Any one of them could have subdued. If I read the article correctly, the owner of the school kept him pinned for 10 minutes after that, demonstrating control. But if you have the advantage in numbers, even if you could succeed 1 on 1, what purpose is there to give up your advantage?

By the same logic, I should not use a weapon if my opponent does not have one because it would be an unfair fight.
 
Ans father, Hong, yanked the attacker away by his shirt and pinned him to the ground. ... An and his brother helped subdue the attacker.

It takes 3 trained MA persons to control 1 untrained person. Something must be wrong in this picture.

In school, you train "1 against many" and not the other way around.

Of course, what they did was a noble thing. But in MA, many against 1 is considered as "unfair fight".
A female MMA fighter captured a man [1 on 1] who robbed a store. (MMA can be used for "self-protection.")

 
A female MMA fighter captured a man [1 on 1] who robbed a store. (MMA can be used for "self-protection.")

No doubt, she used her training there.

But what happened in the OP would be like a BJJ guy walking behind a man choking out a child, tapping him on the shoulder, and punching him in the face as soon as he turns around. And then claiming that he used his BJJ.

Should such a person be commended for his actions? Sure. But he didn't use his BJJ.

Before anybody says anything, I'm aware of "Combat BJJ." But in the given scenario, that's not what he is.
 

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