the multilanguage MA-terms table

MAfreak

Purple Belt
Joined
Feb 1, 2016
Messages
354
Reaction score
50
Location
Germany
from a research years ago i have notices with terms for kicks and punches in english (like in kickboxing), japanese (like in karate) and korean (like in taekwondo).
since it could be interesting or useful for others, i'd like to start a thread with what i wrote down.
if you can, please copy it and add missing terms, so that at the end of the topic theres always an updated table. chinese and thai terms would also be interesting.

kicks
english | japanese | korean
front kick | mae geri | ap chagi
side kick | yoko geri | yop chagi
back kick | ushiro geri | dwit chagi
round kick | mawashi geri | dollyo chagi
hook kick | ura mawashi geri | pandae dollyo chagi
axe kick | kakato geri | naeryo chagi
crescent kick | mikazuki geri | an chagi

punches
english | japanese | korean
jab | kizami zuki | ?
cross | gyaku zuki | ?
hook | kagi zuki | ?
swinger | mawashi zuki | ?
uppercut | ura zuki | ?
backfist | uraken uchi | ?
hammerfist | tettsui uchi | ?
 

Xue Sheng

All weight is underside
Joined
Jan 8, 2006
Messages
33,963
Reaction score
8,983
Location
North American Tectonic Plate
Some of these may not be correct


kicks
english | japanese | korean | Mandarin Chinese
front kick | mae geri | ap chagi | Qi獺n t蘋
side kick | yoko geri | yop chagi | C癡 t蘋
back kick | ushiro geri | dwit chagi | H簷u t蘋
round kick | mawashi geri | dollyo chagi | Hu穩xu獺n t蘋
hook kick | ura mawashi geri | pandae dollyo chagi | Gu t蘋
axe kick | kakato geri | naeryo chagi | Ft籀u t蘋
crescent kick | mikazuki geri | an chagi | Yu癡y獺 t蘋

punches
english | japanese | korean | Mandarin Chinese
jab | kizami zuki | ? | ? qu獺n
cross | gyaku zuki | ? | ? qu獺n
hook | kagi zuki | ? | Gu qu獺n d
swinger | mawashi zuki | ? | ? qu獺n
uppercut | ura zuki | ? | ? qu獺n
backfist | uraken uchi | ? | B癡i qu獺n
hammerfist | tettsui uchi | ? | Chu穩 qu獺n
 

oaktree

Master of Arts
Joined
May 19, 2010
Messages
1,683
Reaction score
264
Location
Under an Oaktree
Are you sure A hook kick is called gou ti and not gou pi:p

Also make sure your don't put just geri it may mean diarrhea:D
Ok enough of my jokes....:panda:
 

WaterGal

Master of Arts
Joined
Jul 16, 2012
Messages
1,795
Reaction score
627
For the Korean, hook kick is huryo chagi, and crescent is bandal chagi. I'm not sure what a swinger punch is, but I've filled in the other punches. Edit: oh, and there are some different names for different sub-types of punches, like ap chigi is a backfist forward to the face, while bakkat chigi is a lateral backfist to the temple.

kicks
english | japanese | korean | Mandarin Chinese
front kick | mae geri | ap chagi | Qi獺n t蘋
side kick | yoko geri | yop chagi | C癡 t蘋
back kick | ushiro geri | dwit chagi | H簷u t蘋
round kick | mawashi geri | dollyo chagi | Hu穩xu獺n t蘋
hook kick | ura mawashi geri | huryo chagi | Gu t蘋
axe kick | kakato geri | naeryo chagi | Ft籀u t蘋
crescent kick | mikazuki geri | bandal chagi | Yu癡y獺 t蘋

punches
english | japanese | korean | Mandarin Chinese
jab | kizami zuki | bandae jireugi | ? qu獺n
cross | gyaku zuki | baro jireugi | ? qu獺n
hook | kagi zuki | dollyo jireugi | Gu qu獺n d
swinger | mawashi zuki | ? | ? qu獺n
uppercut | ura zuki | chi jireugi | ? qu獺n
backfist | uraken uchi | deungjumeok | B癡i qu獺n
hammerfist | tettsui uchi | maejumeok | Chu穩 qu獺n
 
Last edited:

Dirty Dog

MT Senior Moderator
Staff member
Lifetime Supporting Member
Joined
Sep 3, 2009
Messages
22,873
Reaction score
8,513
Location
Pueblo West, CO
For the Korean, hook kick is huryo chagi, and crescent is bandal chagi. I'm not sure what a swinger punch is, but I've filled in the other punches. Edit: oh, and there are some different names for different sub-types of punches, like ap chigi is a backfist forward to the face, while bakkat chigi is a lateral backfist to the temple.

Ap chigi just means "front punch" and is a reasonable term for a jab. Barojireugi could also be used. Bandae jireugi means "reverse punch", which in Korea means a punch with the leading hand, (thus, a jab, basically) but in most of the world it is used to mean a punch from the rear hand. Bakkat chigi means "outward punch", and really needs a modifier such as mejumeok or deungjumeok. If you're specifying a backfist to the face, it would probably be olgul (high section or face) deungjumeok chigi.
A hook kick can also be called dwit dollyo chagi or "reverse roundhouse" in Korean.
Crescent kick is also pyojok chagi, with an pyoyok chagi being inside crescent and bakkat being outside.
There's also the straight leg or stretch kick; cho oi liki chagi (modified for front, side, or backward swings), and chakilo makki, which is a kick used as a block.
And of course, modifiers for skipping kicks (Goolo), jumping kicks (tdwiyo) and spinning (momdolyo), which leads us to things like tdwiyomomdoly dwit dollyo chagi for a jump spin hook kick.
As far as punches go, you're leaving out an awful lot of hand techniques...
The knifehand, (sohnal), modified with Je cho, Oh po and seewoo (palm up, down, or vertical) and further modified if it's a single knifehand with han. So han sohnnal momtong bakkat makki is a single knifehand outward middle section block (as in taegeuk sam jang), while sohnal momtong makki is a double middle knifehand block (as in taegeuk sah jang).
The ridgehand - sohnnal deung.
The palmheel - batangsohn.
The spearhand - pyonsonkoot, again modified with je cho, oh po, or seewoo, as well as modifiers such as kawi (two finger).
The hammerfist - meechomak.
Etc etc etc.

One of the things I've learned is that almost every technique in TKD has at least 17 names...
 

Jaeimseu

3rd Black Belt
Joined
Jun 19, 2011
Messages
923
Reaction score
271
Location
Austin, Texas, USA
Ap chigi just means "front punch" and is a reasonable term for a jab. Barojireugi could also be used. Bandae jireugi means "reverse punch", which in Korea means a punch with the leading hand, (thus, a jab, basically) but in most of the world it is used to mean a punch from the rear hand. Bakkat chigi means "outward punch", and really needs a modifier such as mejumeok or deungjumeok. If you're specifying a backfist to the face, it would probably be olgul (high section or face) deungjumeok chigi.
A hook kick can also be called dwit dollyo chagi or "reverse roundhouse" in Korean.
Crescent kick is also pyojok chagi, with an pyoyok chagi being inside crescent and bakkat being outside.
There's also the straight leg or stretch kick; cho oi liki chagi (modified for front, side, or backward swings), and chakilo makki, which is a kick used as a block.
And of course, modifiers for skipping kicks (Goolo), jumping kicks (tdwiyo) and spinning (momdolyo), which leads us to things like tdwiyomomdoly dwit dollyo chagi for a jump spin hook kick.
As far as punches go, you're leaving out an awful lot of hand techniques...
The knifehand, (sohnal), modified with Je cho, Oh po and seewoo (palm up, down, or vertical) and further modified if it's a single knifehand with han. So han sohnnal momtong bakkat makki is a single knifehand outward middle section block (as in taegeuk sam jang), while sohnal momtong makki is a double middle knifehand block (as in taegeuk sah jang).
The ridgehand - sohnnal deung.
The palmheel - batangsohn.
The spearhand - pyonsonkoot, again modified with je cho, oh po, or seewoo, as well as modifiers such as kawi (two finger).
The hammerfist - meechomak.
Etc etc etc.

One of the things I've learned is that almost every technique in TKD has at least 17 names...
Very true...so many names.

These days we are commonly just using deungjumok for backfist, not including the direction. We call hook kick huryeo chagi or dwihuryeo chagi for the spinning one. A single hand knife hand block is hansonnal makki, while the double hand is just sonnal makki. We specify direction for momtong bakkat makki, but the we just use momtong makki instead of momtong an makki. We call the double roundhouse kick narae chagi, the tornado kick dolgae chagi or turning kick. The skipping round kick or fast kick is bbareunbal dollyo chagi.

These terms are not necessarily the official Kukkiwon terms, but they are the commonly used terms at our dojang in Seoul.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

Gnarlie

Master of Arts
Joined
Dec 13, 2011
Messages
1,913
Reaction score
445
Location
Germany
Too many terms for the same things to make this worthwhile. The terminology for ITF TKD is very different too.

A few notes:

Pyojeok means target, and has nothing to do with inward crescent kick unless the hand is kicked.

and

the term momdollyo hurigi is popular for reverse hook kick.

and

Godeureo is used to describe supported hand techniques.

Are you in Germany MAfreak?

Sent from my Nexus 5 using Tapatalk
 
OP
MAfreak

MAfreak

Purple Belt
Joined
Feb 1, 2016
Messages
354
Reaction score
50
Location
Germany
yes i am.
i know there are sometimes many terms, for example the hook kick aka heel kick aka whip kick, which has its spin version. then in japanese its not longer just called ura mawashi geri but ushiro ura mawashi geri, etc.
but i thought we could maybe collect the most common terms for interested people to search. for example pandae dollyo chagi videos might be more detailed then ura mawashi geri since tkd does a bit different then karate.
 

Dirty Dog

MT Senior Moderator
Staff member
Lifetime Supporting Member
Joined
Sep 3, 2009
Messages
22,873
Reaction score
8,513
Location
Pueblo West, CO
Very true...so many names.

These days we are commonly just using deungjumok for backfist, not including the direction. We call hook kick huryeo chagi or dwihuryeo chagi for the spinning one. A single hand knife hand block is hansonnal makki, while the double hand is just sonnal makki. We specify direction for momtong bakkat makki, but the we just use momtong makki instead of momtong an makki. We call the double roundhouse kick narae chagi, the tornado kick dolgae chagi or turning kick. The skipping round kick or fast kick is bbareunbal dollyo chagi.

I doubt any of us use the full and complete names very often. :) I know we do not.
Honestly, in class I'd likely say "outside middle block" in English, while demonstrating. We do use some Korean, but not to this degree. Because we're not in Korea...

Pyojeok means target, and has nothing to do with inward crescent kick unless the hand is kicked.

Mea Culpa. A crescent kick is bandal an chagi (inside) or bandal bakkat chagi (outside).
 

Gnarlie

Master of Arts
Joined
Dec 13, 2011
Messages
1,913
Reaction score
445
Location
Germany
yes i am.
i know there are sometimes many terms, for example the hook kick aka heel kick aka whip kick, which has its spin version. then in japanese its not longer just called ura mawashi geri but ushiro ura mawashi geri, etc.
but i thought we could maybe collect the most common terms for interested people to search. for example pandae dollyo chagi videos might be more detailed then ura mawashi geri since tkd does a bit different then karate.
It is also worth noting that the German language romanisations of Korean tend to be different from the English language romanisations. That is, the German romanisations are non-standard. Terms like Paltung, Pandae are Baldeung and Bandae using the standard. This is important when searching for things as it will get you more results. It also means even more alternatives for the list. This is why reading and understanding Hangul is a good idea. Then you only need the one.

I'm also in DE.
 

WaterGal

Master of Arts
Joined
Jul 16, 2012
Messages
1,795
Reaction score
627
Ap chigi just means "front punch" and is a reasonable term for a jab.

For whatever it's worth, the official Kukkiwon definition of ap chigi is a forward backfist. Not sure about other styles/organizations - other groups might use it refer to "front strikes" more generally?
 

Gnarlie

Master of Arts
Joined
Dec 13, 2011
Messages
1,913
Reaction score
445
Location
Germany
For whatever it's worth, the official Kukkiwon definition of ap chigi is a forward backfist. Not sure about other styles/organizations - other groups might use it refer to "front strikes" more generally?

Per the KKW textbook chigi means strike. Ap means front. Without the 'deungjumeok', you just have 'front strike', which could just as well be batangson ap chigi, mureup ap chigi, palkup ap chigi or a number of others.

A punch is 'jireugi', rather than chigi.
 

Dirty Dog

MT Senior Moderator
Staff member
Lifetime Supporting Member
Joined
Sep 3, 2009
Messages
22,873
Reaction score
8,513
Location
Pueblo West, CO
For whatever it's worth, the official Kukkiwon definition of ap chigi is a forward backfist. Not sure about other styles/organizations - other groups might use it refer to "front strikes" more generally?

Ap means front. Chigi means strike. And a "forward backfist" is something of an oxymoron. By it's very nature, a backfist strike cannot really be moving straight forward. It can be horizontal or vertical, but it cannot really be straight. Assuming a normal person throwing the punch, of course. That is why "front strike" would be an appropriate term for a jab. Obviously, there are other terms that could be equally well suited.

This is a clip from an instructional video produced by the KKW. It shows deungjumeok ap chigi, specifically the vertical (seewoo) version of the backfist. This technique is used in Palgwae yook jang (this one is specifically a high section backfist, so it is olgoolchigi), Taegeuk oh jang, and Taegeuk pal jang. Palgwae pal jang teaches deungjumeok bakkatchigi, the horizontal (strictly speaking "outward") backfist strike.


The Korean terms taught in TKD schools are often NOT actual translations of the Korean, or at best they are partial translations. For example, "jebipoom mokchigi" (swallow form neck strike) or teokchigi (chin strike) do not contain anything in the names that would indicate to the student that these techniques are strikes with the knifehand (sohnal) and palm heel (batangson) respectively. They are fine examples of what I said above, about the need to demonstrate while naming the technique, simply because the commonly used names do not always actually tell you what the technique is. Frankly, I'm not even sure how these two techniques came to be known as "swallow form."
 

Dirty Dog

MT Senior Moderator
Staff member
Lifetime Supporting Member
Joined
Sep 3, 2009
Messages
22,873
Reaction score
8,513
Location
Pueblo West, CO
http://www.nature-education.org/cliff-swallow-shape.gif

It is reminiscent of the wings in the upper image.

Yeah... I don't see it. Maybe you need to have a more artistic temperament than I do. There is a "wing spreading" posture in cheonkwon, which makes a bit more sense since the arms are outspread as they would be for flight. But one arm above the head and one in front? I'm no ornithologist, but I don't recall ever seeing a bird with their wings in such a position.
 

Gnarlie

Master of Arts
Joined
Dec 13, 2011
Messages
1,913
Reaction score
445
Location
Germany
Yeah... I don't see it. Maybe you need to have a more artistic temperament than I do. There is a "wing spreading" posture in cheonkwon, which makes a bit more sense since the arms are outspread as they would be for flight. But one arm above the head and one in front? I'm no ornithologist, but I don't recall ever seeing a bird with their wings in such a position.
384e34b315f6870fa121d4ecd1ba34d9.jpg


c8de571858800aee03e27d33e9e528f1.jpg


How about now?
 

Dirty Dog

MT Senior Moderator
Staff member
Lifetime Supporting Member
Joined
Sep 3, 2009
Messages
22,873
Reaction score
8,513
Location
Pueblo West, CO
Nope. See, the bird has it's wings extended to the sides and back, like a modern swept wing fighter. If the bird put one wing in front of it's beak, and pointed the other at the ground, it would be cat food.

As I said, maybe if you have an artistic mind, you can see it, but I do not.

That doesn't stop me from executing the technique, however. :)
 

WaterGal

Master of Arts
Joined
Jul 16, 2012
Messages
1,795
Reaction score
627
I've always been pretty ???? about that one, too, hahaha. I always figured the name was trying to convey something about the way your arms move smoothly in sync to do the two techniques together, rather than doing the block and then the neck strike. I don't know what that has to do with birds, but I figured that was something cultural that got lost in translation. And the Kukkiwon textbook is no help, it says something like "this technique is named for swallow wing shape" - gee, thanks. :D
 

Gnarlie

Master of Arts
Joined
Dec 13, 2011
Messages
1,913
Reaction score
445
Location
Germany
You have to look at the 2 dimensional shape, rather than 3 dimensional. On paper, the curve of the arms is similar to the curve of the wings. If you overlaid the picture of the bird onto the TKDin, maybe you would see it.

Sent from my Nexus 5 using Tapatalk
 

Latest Discussions

Top