The first martial arts book you would recommend

Shirt Ripper

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Any book on flexibility/injury prevention. Of course, that's my background coming in...not really a Martial arts literature recommendation per se, but a good one I think.

A few of the broad topic one's Loren Christiansen I think, would be good as well, though I disagree on a few issues.
 

Ybot

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I would recomend Ultimate Sparring Principles & Practices by Shihan Jonathan Mayberry. I found this book really does a good job of describing the sparring practices and rules of a lot of different arts. Really gives you and idea of what you would actually DO in that art. Cool stuff. I kinda want to try Singlestick Fencing or La Canne.
 

kidswarrior

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See this thread is old, but it's new to me. :) So, my two cents: Bruce Tegner's Complete Book of Self Defense. Classic.
 

Touch Of Death

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"The Destroyer" they lost me at about book 100 but I wouldn't be in the martial arts if I weren't secretly attempting to master Sinanju.:ultracool
Sean

PS tell no one!
 

exile

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I'd recommend Iain Abernethy's Bunkai-Jutsu: Practical Applications of Karate Kata. I know it's not considered an introductory type of book, but I imagine myself reading it as a complete beginner interested in a hard linear striking art, and then imagine myself five, six years later, having absorbed what IA has to say. I would be extremely grateful for having gotten off on the right foot in learning how to approach kata, what they're formanuals of combat applications, and for IA's insistance that mastery of a MA is first a foremost learning a technical toolkit, governed by sound and effective principles, that give you the skills to come out standing from the horrible nastiness of street violencethe message on every page being, the combat realism of karate techs, properly trained. I'd be grateful also for his lucid, nonmystical discussion of body weak points and how to exploit them, his systematic exploration of what fighting at different ranges requires, and especially his advice on putting stand-up techs to use in ground fighting (always with the intention of getting off the ground as soon as possible). So it seems to me a really outstanding introduction to (a certain family of) MAs...
 

kidswarrior

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I'd recommend Iain Abernethy's Bunkai-Jutsu: Practical Applications of Karate Kata. I know it's not considered an introductory type of book, but I imagine myself reading it as a complete beginner interested in a hard linear striking art, and then imagine myself five, six years later, having absorbed what IA has to say. I would be extremely grateful for having gotten off on the right foot in learning how to approach kata, what they're formanuals of combat applications, and for IA's insistance that mastery of a MA is first a foremost learning a technical toolkit, governed by sound and effective principles, that give you the skills to come out standing from the horrible nastiness of street violencethe message on every page being, the combat realism of karate techs, properly trained. I'd be grateful also for his lucid, nonmystical discussion of body weak points and how to exploit them, his systematic exploration of what fighting at different ranges requires, and especially his advice on putting stand-up techs to use in ground fighting (always with the intention of getting off the ground as soon as possible). So it seems to me a really outstanding introduction to (a certain family of) MAs...

I have this on order now. Thanks for the preview, Exile. :)
 

exile

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I have this on order now. Thanks for the preview, Exile. :)

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Good on ya, kdswrrr! I've read it, cover to cover and in bits and pieces, at least four times so far and I'm always struck by the new stuff I come across in each reading. IA knows karate inside out, and, almost as important he can write!. You won't be disappointed... I'd be very interested in hearing from you how the book strikes you.
 

stickarts

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The Tao of Pooh has already been mentioned... so I would have to go with Zen and the Martial Arts, by Joe Hyams

There are a number of good books but I go along with Zen and the martial arts. Easy reading and some good info.
 

kidswarrior

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icon14.gif
Good on ya, kdswrrr! I've read it, cover to cover and in bits and pieces, at least four times so far and I'm always struck by the new stuff I come across in each reading. IA knows karate inside out, and, almost as important he can write!. You won't be disappointed... I'd be very interested in hearing from you how the book strikes you.

You got it. Long as I get your ideas in return. :)
 

Blindside

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Autumn Lightning by Dave Lowry

or

Zen and the Martial Arts by Hyam

Zen is probably applicable to a broader variety of people in different arts, but Autumn Lightning is such an engaging story and history of a Japanese Art.
 

kidswarrior

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The 'third' first book I'd recommend (Mods are going to cut me off soon, so typing fast ;)) is for the beginner who only wants street defense: Get Tough: How to win in hand-to-hand fighting, by Major Fairbairn. Dates from WWII and even before when Fairbairn was working Shanghai water front :mst:, but if that's what someone's looking for, it's simply the best.
 

exile

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The 'third' first book I'd recommend (Mods are going to cut me off soon, so typing fast ;)) is for the beginner who only wants street defense: Get Tough: How to win in hand-to-hand fighting, by Major Fairbairn. Dates from WWII and even before when Fairbairn was working Shanghai water front :mst:, but if that's what someone's looking for, it's simply the best.

This is the latest in a series of very good things I've heard about Fairbairn's book. I need to order it from Amazon... they have it in stock and it's quite reasonably priced...
 
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