Striking or grappling

drummingman

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I've been out of martial arts for a few years now because of being on blood thinners. But I'm no longer on the thinners so I'm looking to get back into it. But I have a question. Which is harder on the hands, wrists and fingers: striking or grappling? I ask because my job is very dependent on my hands and because I already have tendonitis in both wrists as well as some carpal tunnel issues in both wrists as well.

I'm looking into doing either Bjj, Boxing or Muay Thai.
 

skribs

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Take Taekwondo! We focus on kicks, and you can barely use your hands in the WT sparring rules, so it's perfect! (I'm only half-joking).

If you're punching correctly, and especially if you're wearing gloves and properly wrapping your wrists, there should be low risk with striking. I can't speak for most grappling arts, but I recommend staying away from Aikido and Hapkido.
 

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I've been out of martial arts for a few years now because of being on blood thinners. But I'm no longer on the thinners so I'm looking to get back into it. But I have a question. Which is harder on the hands, wrists and fingers: striking or grappling? I ask because my job is very dependent on my hands and because I already have tendonitis in both wrists as well as some carpal tunnel issues in both wrists as well.

I'm looking into doing either Bjj, Boxing or Muay Thai.


All is going to affect you sir is the short answer

however if you go into the arts that as part of them require grabbing, locking and joint manipulation as core then imo it gonna put more stress on you ............................that said it depends how you wanna train as in how full on etc and how full on the dojo you choose trains
 

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Oh and as a post script

No matter what art you choose tell the Instructor what your issues are before you hit the training hall etc ...your not whimping out by doing that your merely making it a safer environment for all to train in ....if they Know then it safer for you and them and your body is your priority as you as you said have to earn a living outside the Arts
 

gpseymour

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A lot depends what level of exercise your hands and wrists can tolerate. Over time, it's likely moderate exercise will help for most folks, but it's hard to say for your case, specifically. You probably don't want anything with lots of wrist locking early on, nor a lot of grip fighting. But if it starts out relatively gentle, then you can gauge how it's affecting you. I'd expect a BJJ school to be able to accommodate that for a month or so while you find out how your hands react. You could do the same with some of the standing grappling styles (Aikido, Hapkido, Nihon Goshin Aikido, some Japanese Jujutsu). Toss Judo in there as an option to toy with, though both it and BJJ will eventually need you to be able to use your grip with strength on a regular basis. Pretty much any grappling will need that, but I think it's more a need/focus with styles that compete, especially if they compete in gi.

For me, striking has less of an aggravating effect on my tendinitis, but that's probably because of where it is. For some people with tenderness in the wrists, punching will just make it worse. If you try out striking, I'd ask the instructor to let you try some soft, slow drills on a target (heavy bag, whatever) under supervision, so you can see how your hands and wrists react when you do it softly and "correctly".
 

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Carpal tunnel syndrome is pretty common in boxers. Due in large part to all the bag work. Proper technique, gloves and wrapping help, but it definitely doesn’t eliminate it by any means. If you’re already suffering from it, it’ll only make it worse.
 

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I’d imagine the grip fighting in grappling arts with a gi wouldn’t do you any favors. Wrestling should most likely be fine. I haven’t done any BJJ, but I could see no-gi BJJ being ok too. Stuff like Judo and BJJ with a gi will probably cause issues from all the gripping.
 

Ironbear24

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I’d imagine the grip fighting in grappling arts with a gi wouldn’t do you any favors. Wrestling should most likely be fine. I haven’t done any BJJ, but I could see no-gi BJJ being ok too. Stuff like Judo and BJJ with a gi will probably cause issues from all the gripping.

I agree with you. My hands and fingers have been through some things, and stuff. To the OP, I recommend a hybrid art that does both. Hybrid arts do grappling but not exclusively.
 

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I've been out of martial arts for a few years now because of being on blood thinners. But I'm no longer on the thinners so I'm looking to get back into it. But I have a question. Which is harder on the hands, wrists and fingers: striking or grappling? I ask because my job is very dependent on my hands and because I already have tendonitis in both wrists as well as some carpal tunnel issues in both wrists as well.

I'm looking into doing either Bjj, Boxing or Muay Thai.
Grappling all most certainly, but wouldn't you be better grasping the Nettle so to speak and building the strength in your wrists rather than just avoiding it,
 

gpseymour

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Grappling all most certainly, but wouldn't you be better grasping the Nettle so to speak and building the strength in your wrists rather than just avoiding it,
With tendinitis and some injuries, exertion makes it worse, if it reaches a certain point.
 

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With tendinitis and some injuries, exertion makes it worse, if it reaches a certain point.


I agree there

As you posted earlier the grappling Arts do require the manipulation of the hands etc and really I'd say that if anyone has issues that way then is prevention not better than cure so to speak,

I get your point that it can be handled early on as in techs not fully applied but imo it not just the techs of Aikido etc it taking ukemi and break falling too as again my opinion even doing those could cause issues and more aggravation, just my opinion tho
 

jobo

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With tendinitis and some injuries, exertion makes it worse, if it reaches a certain point.
Possibly, yet any Treatment consists exercising the injury, so it's only really the degree of exertion that's in question, certainly not manipulating the jointS( using grip strength) will make it worse and lead to muscles atrophy and calcification of the joints
 

gpseymour

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Possibly, yet any Treatment consists exercising the injury, so it's only really the degree of exertion that's in question, certainly not manipulating the jointS( using grip strength) will make it worse and lead to muscles atrophy and calcification of the joints

Exercise and stretching for tendinitis has to stay this side of the pain. With a severe case, that means very light work, done very carefully (or possibly even periods of near complete rest). Not always possible in the midst of grappling. There were periods when I had to avoid any significant use of my left hand for grip in training.
 

jobo

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Exercise and stretching for tendinitis has to stay this side of the pain. With a severe case, that means very light work, done very carefully (or possibly even periods of near complete rest). Not always possible in the midst of grappling. There were periods when I had to avoid any significant use of my left hand for grip in training.
Yes but that's you are you are with out doubt an expert on the Do we and donts of your condition, but the op hasn't stated his is " severe" nOr di I recommend grappling, I recommended building the strength in is wrists / fingers , that may or may not at some point means he can grapple, but will most certainly add more quality of life than just not using them
 

FriedRice

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I've been out of martial arts for a few years now because of being on blood thinners. But I'm no longer on the thinners so I'm looking to get back into it. But I have a question. Which is harder on the hands, wrists and fingers: striking or grappling? I ask because my job is very dependent on my hands and because I already have tendonitis in both wrists as well as some carpal tunnel issues in both wrists as well.

I'm looking into doing either Bjj, Boxing or Muay Thai.

BJJ will probably hurt those body parts you listed as injured, the most, out of these 3 styles.
 

Martial D

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I've been out of martial arts for a few years now because of being on blood thinners. But I'm no longer on the thinners so I'm looking to get back into it. But I have a question. Which is harder on the hands, wrists and fingers: striking or grappling? I ask because my job is very dependent on my hands and because I already have tendonitis in both wrists as well as some carpal tunnel issues in both wrists as well.

I'm looking into doing either Bjj, Boxing or Muay Thai.
Maybe look into some No Touch Knockout styles?

They are easy on the wrists, but you might get a cramp in your big toe doing the defenses.
 

JR 137

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Maybe look into some No Touch Knockout styles?

They are easy on the wrists, but you might get a cramp in your big toe doing the defenses.
I’m pretty sure the chi energy will heal it up too, especially if he gets the half moons in his fingernails.
 

Ironbear24

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Possibly, yet any Treatment consists exercising the injury, so it's only really the degree of exertion that's in question, certainly not manipulating the jointS( using grip strength) will make it worse and lead to muscles atrophy and calcification of the joints

Then he should see a physical therapist and not a Judoka.
 
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