Stoic Quote

Highlander

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"I don't care about the author as long as the line is good" -Seneca

The source doesn't matter, if something is viable its viable. I feel a lot of traditional artists are quick to dismiss ideas or techniques simple because it's from another system. Better to collect and share knowledge from as many sources as possible.
Any thoughts on this???
 

pdg

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I have to agree with the sentiment - with the caveat that I'm not entirely sure how 'traditional' I would be deemed...
 

yak sao

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I've never been a fan of cross training , but I do like training with people from other systems.
This allows me to see how well I'm able to work what I do against other methods.
By this approach it unlocks various movements that I may never have had to use if I only practiced with people from my own system.

I know it's not a popular approach in this day of MMA, but I'm of the opinion that you should take what you have and work it to death, ingraining it into your body and applying it as often as you can.

I'd rather go into a situation knowing that what I'm going to do is going to have as few variables as possible than wondering and waiting to see what my opponent is going to do and then trying to beat him at his own game.
 

jobo

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"I don't care about the author as long as the line is good" -Seneca

The source doesn't matter, if something is viable its viable. I feel a lot of traditional artists are quick to dismiss ideas or techniques simple because it's from another system. Better to collect and share knowledge from as many sources as possible.
Any thoughts on this???
would that just end up looking a lot like mma ?
 

Flying Crane

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A good martial system that is well structured ought to operate on a certain foundation. This gives consistency in what you do, which is very important when developing your skills.

Some things from a different system may not work well on that foundation. In that case, that thing has no place in your system. To try to adopt it in spite of that problem creates a disjointed and inconsistent system, a Frankensteins monster of a system if a lot of that is brought in.

So there are very real reasons to not adopt techniques or methods from other systems. It is not always about simply dismissing everything that is foreign to your system. Obviously some things could be adopted if they can function smoothly on your systems foundation.

Recognizing that something has no place in your system is easily as important as broadening your perspective by looking at other methods.
 

Monkey Turned Wolf

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I feel like in terms of the quote itself, a bad quote can be good, and vice versa not necessarily by the person who makes it, but by the context. Similarly, there are things in some systems that look like crap on their own, but make sense in the context of the system, and things that look great in context, but when you try to take it out it just wont work for you, because it relies on all the other stuff in that system to work.
 

Yoshiyahu

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Sparring non-compliant partners who don't practice Wing Chun is the best way to get timing, skill and understanding on how to make your wing chun works as a purist. You can make the WC work for you by sparring alot with non-compiant sparring partners who are trying to win or attack you. It helps if they don't know any Wing Chun at all because in the real world most people have no idea what a Tan Sao or Bong Sao is.
Use MMA gloves so you can effectively use your Tan-Fok-Bong correctly. An use your sun fist punches. Use phoenix eye and ginger fist if possible. Thinking of sparring as the final step of realizing your wing chun
 
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Highlander

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A good martial system that is well structured ought to operate on a certain foundation. This gives consistency in what you do, which is very important when developing your skills.

Some things from a different system may not work well on that foundation. In that case, that thing has no place in your system. To try to adopt it in spite of that problem creates a disjointed and inconsistent system, a Frankensteins monster of a system if a lot of that is brought in.

So there are very real reasons to not adopt techniques or methods from other systems. It is not always about simply dismissing everything that is foreign to your system. Obviously some things could be adopted if they can function smoothly on your systems foundation.

Recognizing that something has no place in your system is easily as important as broadening your perspective by looking at other methods.
I agree 100%, dont take things and jam them together just because you like a move. I use this more like Yak sao was saying. Training with other like minded people and just playing and growing together. Sometimes even practicing some of the moves they do in the moment (even if it doesnt agree with my system) just to get a better understanding of how they move. A good example of what I mean is this, I play around with boxing concepts on the heavy bag, I shadow box, and sometimes mess with the footwork. I've never had an official boxing class, so I do boxing through the eyes of my WT. I didnt change my WT fighting style to adopt boxing but by looking at the drills and concepts they teach I opened up my WT and found a lot of the same concepts in WT. Same thing with Tai Chi, I dont train it to learn it, I train the form because it's cool to me and it really helps enforce slow smooth body unity.
 
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Highlander

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would that just end up looking a lot like mma ?
Would it look like MMA in a fight? Probably. But the training method is different. Depends on a lot of factors. Me and my Sifu like to say "good fighting is good fighting"
 

jobo

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Would it look like MMA in a fight? Probably. But the training method is different. Depends on a lot of factors. Me and my Sifu like to say "good fighting is good fighting"
if the end result is a lot like mma, then the best way of training it would look a lot like mma training..

if you can add technique as they are better, you can add the best way of training those techniques, as they are better also !
 
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Highlander

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if the end result is a lot like mma, then the best way of training it would look a lot like mma training..

if you can add technique as they are better, you can add the best way of training those techniques, as they are better also !

I say that because I dont have grand illusions that my fighting well look anything like WT in a fight. The end result of the system itself is still very much WT. I dont change my strategy or style based on distance or level of fight (standing, grappling, ground, etc)
When I train other systems it's more trying to figure out how I can make my WT work with and against said system.

MMA training when it comes down to it is really just another training style. And we probably have more in common then not
 

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