Self motivation.

P

pineapple head

Guest
Hi all....

Over the last few months i have dragged myself to class once a week , i used to look forward to class so much , in fact after Thursday class i had withdrawll symptoms after one hour thinking of the wait til Mondays !!!!!!

I know i have been working very long hours lately and so on ....but i think they is something missing now for my desire for Kenpo and to train.
I WANT this to go away as i love Kenpo , training , and generally going to class.
Have any of you guys been in this position before?

Pleeeese help me i have Kenpo sickness! Oh no......:wah:

Gary.
 
Originally posted by pineapple head

Hi all....

Over the last few months i have dragged myself to class once a week , i used to look forward to class so much , in fact after Thursday class i had withdrawll symptoms after one hour thinking of the wait til Mondays !!!!!!

I know i have been working very long hours lately and so on ....but i think they is something missing now for my desire for Kenpo and to train.
I WANT this to go away as i love Kenpo , training , and generally going to class.
Have any of you guys been in this position before?

Pleeeese help me i have Kenpo sickness! Oh no......:wah:

Gary.


I had a similar problem. I look forward to class all day long, and
then after dealing with traffic, I get home and have a loss of
motivation. For me, I have to force myself to go on mondays, and
that's all I need. I'm INTENSELLY fired up for the rest of the
week. I don't know what the weekend or that traffic does to
me! My suggestion would be to try and suck it up on monday,
and just go. Force yourself!
 
First, you may want to look here. It is sometimes tough to get motivated for class. When I was in school, I got so busy I could only go one day - Saturday. But since Saturday was also my only day off, I would want to relax instead of driving an hour to class to work out and run tots (ages 3-5) classes.
One day, unexpectedly, my instructor called. He said he understood my situation but also wanted me to come back. He knew my desire and wanted me to be there to train. That got me over the hump.
Sometimes it takes something small to spur you along and sometimes it is tough to drag yourself to class. Maybe a short break is in order. Reevaluate why you are in the martial arts and set new goals. See if you can do some training at home instead of having to go to the school. Most importantly, don't quit, stick it out and you may be surprised with the results. Good luck.
:asian:
 
Originally posted by jkn75

First, you may want to look here. It is sometimes tough to get motivated for class.

One day, unexpectedly, my instructor called. He said he understood my situation but also wanted me to come back. He knew my desire and wanted me to be there to train. That got me over the hump.
Sometimes it takes something small to spur you along and sometimes it is tough to drag yourself to class. Maybe a short break is in order. Reevaluate why you are in the martial arts and set new goals. See if you can do some training at home instead of having to go to the school. Most importantly, don't quit, stick it out and you may be surprised with the results. Good luck.
:asian:

Great advice,

I wish my original instructor had "called me" when I left the art. I was young, motivated but unfocused, only wanted to bang and didn't understand what was before me.

I agree sometimes you just need that one "thing" to keep you going. At some point in your career it will be your experience that does it. Knowing that in training is where your supposed to be and without it your body and mind will ache for the smack, crack, boom sound that goes along with that heavy weight gi trying to handle the movements your body is making.

I disagree with "taking a break". The saying goes, take a day off you know, take 2 days off your students know, take three days off and your opponents know.

As a beginner it's already hard enough get the coordination and all the information down. The more exposure the better. Maybe take a private lesson (Wow, spend $50 bucks or whatever??? What the hell am I talking about???). I never could afford it, but you'll find that that private instruction will get you motivated. Your instructor, if he (she) has some snap will share some nuances with you that you might have not otherwise seen or been exposed to. Instead of the standard introduction they will give you the next level to those techniques and they will allow you to ask those questions you've wanted to ask, but were afraid to. Also they'll normally give you more than the "hour" your paying for. Finally, it will show the instructor that you are committed to making this thing happen and they will make sure that happens. Just my thoughts....

jb
 
My suggestion is this: just keep doing what you're doing; just keep dragging yourself to class.

Whoever said that everything has to be exciting all the time, each and every minute? There's something to be said for just plain putting your head down (well, not actually, not in kenpo) and just continue. Why can't training be boring?

Here's two reasons to just keep going, the first of which is: part of you--part of you and me--does not want to get better. It wants to stay where it was, because that's comfortable, however unpleasant that comfort might be. It will resent anything, anything at all, that means change--and it will put up all sorts of defenses. Among these will be boredom, and excuses, and complaints such aas, "well, they're not really teaching me anything." This is why it's dangerous to have a exploitative instructor: they can use this logic to screw you up and keep you paying forever.

The second reason is this: we live in a quickie culture. It is as important to learn how to train slowly, patiently, to ride through setbacks, as it is to learn aanythign else in kenpo. Maybe more important. You may even find that this dullness is your unconscious' last-dictch attempt to keep you from some important advance, some change that you're right on the verge of.

I'd say just keep training. Keep with the habit; ignore the boredom.
 
Originally posted by rmcrobertson

My suggestion is this: just keep doing what you're doing; just keep dragging yourself to class.

Whoever said that everything has to be exciting all the time, each and every minute? There's something to be said for just plain putting your head down (well, not actually, not in kenpo) and just continue. Why can't training be boring?

Here's two reasons to just keep going, the first of which is: part of you--part of you and me--does not want to get better. It wants to stay where it was, because that's comfortable, however unpleasant that comfort might be. It will resent anything, anything at all, that means change--and it will put up all sorts of defenses. Among these will be boredom, and excuses, and complaints such aas, "well, they're not really teaching me anything." This is why it's dangerous to have a exploitative instructor: they can use this logic to screw you up and keep you paying forever.

The second reason is this: we live in a quickie culture. It is as important to learn how to train slowly, patiently, to ride through setbacks, as it is to learn aanythign else in kenpo. Maybe more important. You may even find that this dullness is your unconscious' last-dictch attempt to keep you from some important advance, some change that you're right on the verge of.

I'd say just keep training. Keep with the habit; ignore the boredom.


WELL SAID DR BOB!
 
I sure can attest to feeling what you do.. I'm at the studio 5 nights a week.. we teach kids class 3 nights a week and have two 2 hour classes at the college a week.. so by Saturday Seig and I are definitely burned out..
Whatever you do.. don't take a break.. it's sooo much harder to get back to where you were.. and if anything.. you lose more than you gained..
So keep going~!! Maybe if you could get to class more if it's offered that might give you an incentive :)

Good luck

With Respect,

Tess
 
There is some really good advice in this thread.
I think the additional advice has been great but I do have to disagree with not taking a break. Let me clarify: I'm not advocating a long break just a short one, maybe 2 weeks at the most but even this may be too long.
This is also a working break. Still do martial arts; just on your own, at home. Use the break to evaluate where you are in the martial arts and where you want to be. Understand that it may take time to get there (see rmcrobertson's comments) and is not an easy road.
Granted you may take a couple steps back in skill and material because of the break but if you are bored/frustrated in class, you're already taking some steps back. The steps forward you make in desire may make up for the material you missed out on. Additionally, just not being in class for a couple of weeks will effect the way you feel. It is my opinion that the way you feel without martial arts will be worse than with martial arts.

Additionally, talk to your instructor. Tell him of your problems and he may be able to help you out.
Good Luck.:asian:
 
Is there anyone else in class that feels the same way you do? Perhaps you could get together and call each other (alternate weeks) and motivate each other for class.....

I have had a couple of periods of time where my work has gotten so crazy that I have had to miss class. A couple of years ago, one of my friends in class at the time (he has since moved on) called me at work one day and reminded me of my "appointment" that night with the "attitude adjustment clinic" and "Dr. Whomp". I was laughing the rest of the day, and still joke about it. From then on, we have made jokes about needing "positive attitude adjustment" appointments in class--meaning that we might just call you up and set an appointment, if we haven't seen you in class in some time.....

I'm like anyone else on this topic: I love class, and love what I learn. Kenpo flows in my blood. I think I would have a *real* hard time living in a world with no MA. However, occasionally, when I get home from work and plant my butt on the couch, I can think of a million reasons not to go to class. Sometimes, those million reasons win, sometimes they don't. It all depends.

Seriously, though. Keep with it. If you need a break, take one, but GET BACK IN THERE!! Yes, your opponents will notice if you take three days off. But remember: there is always someone training twice as hard as you. Train *your* way; listen to your body and your mind. If you consistently force the issue, you may come to hate it. Keep your training fresh and exiting--play music on your way to class (something driving and "inspiring", that you might use for training). Think of a question that you want to know the answer to (regarding your training) and make that the reason to go to class. There are many ways to do it.....

Hang in there, man....you'll get through it. Trust me.

:asian:

Peace--
 
"Train *your* way; listen to your body and your mind. "

I like that advice. :D
 
Originally posted by tonbo

Is there anyone else in class that feels the same way you do? Perhaps you could get together and call each other (alternate weeks) and motivate each other for class.....

I have had a couple of periods of time where my work has gotten so crazy that I have had to miss class. A couple of years ago, one of my friends in class at the time (he has since moved on) called me at work one day and reminded me of my "appointment" that night with the "attitude adjustment clinic" and "Dr. Whomp". I was laughing the rest of the day, and still joke about it. From then on, we have made jokes about needing "positive attitude adjustment" appointments in class--meaning that we might just call you up and set an appointment, if we haven't seen you in class in some time.....

I'm like anyone else on this topic: I love class, and love what I learn. Kenpo flows in my blood. I think I would have a *real* hard time living in a world with no MA. However, occasionally, when I get home from work and plant my butt on the couch, I can think of a million reasons not to go to class. Sometimes, those million reasons win, sometimes they don't. It all depends.

Seriously, though. Keep with it. If you need a break, take one, but GET BACK IN THERE!! Yes, your opponents will notice if you take three days off. But remember: there is always someone training twice as hard as you. Train *your* way; listen to your body and your mind. If you consistently force the issue, you may come to hate it. Keep your training fresh and exiting--play music on your way to class (something driving and "inspiring", that you might use for training). Think of a question that you want to know the answer to (regarding your training) and make that the reason to go to class. There are many ways to do it.....

Hang in there, man....you'll get through it. Trust me.

:asian:

Peace--

Hey thanks Tonbo , i found that this post really hit home.
I went to class last night and really enjoyed it , we learned a couple of new techs and had some fun too.
I feel that i have overcome my problem , i have slowed the work schedule down a gear and i am spending more time with the kids.
Its strange work and Kenpo i find do not mix that well but you put equal amounts of work family and Kenpo in the same pot then you have the right ingredients.
With this equal balance i think i can go on and improve my Kenpo lots.
May i just take this oppertunity to thank my instuctor Mr. Grihault for putting up with my absence.Owch !! oh oh i wondered why he was using me a lot as the attacker last night.
:)
Seriously ...thanks guys for the advice.

Have a great weekend.

Gary:asian:
 
Originally posted by tonbo

Kenpo flows in my blood.
This sound is so right to me. Funny, one day I said (jocking) to my husband (American) that my Chinese MA blood is so pumped up and I am so ready for any kind of MA weapons training; just show me how to do it. :D Watch too much MA movies.

play music on your way to class (something driving and "inspiring", that you might use for training).
I don't need music to get me to the class because I can't wait to be in the class. Monday is hard for me because there is no class on both Sunday and Monday, so I HAVE TO wait till Tuesday. :( Here what I want to say is that the music helps me to get start when I can't get start practicing at home; it works everytime. Try it with the music it would pump your Kenpo blood. :D
I have some bad experiences with "taking a break". :rolleyes: I wouldn't do it any more.
Hanging there, it will get better. :asian:

Min
 
You are quite right!! I listen to music at home to practice with. Sometimes, it is hard driving "metal", other times traditional Japanese (or Chinese!!). I have used Taiko drums (Kodo ROCKS!!) as well as blues, pop, jazz, techno.....you name it, I have worked a beat to it (literally!).....

"Music hath charms to soothe the savage breast....".....or to get blood pumping through it, no?

Much appreciation, MinnieMin!!

:asian: :asian:

Peace--
 
treat your body like you treat your mind...

if you're studying and find yourself unmotivated to the point of boredom and pages looking blurry, you take a study break.

Do the same for martial arts. Take a week off. (but no more than a week, and have your teacher call you on monday to remind you to get your tail back into the school) If you're bored and not enjoying it, you won't put forth your best effort, and are probably just wasting your time anyway. Take a little vacation and come back refreshed.

Use the time you would be in class to do other important stress relieving things (DON"T JUST WATCH TV). Take the family out somewhere... spend some time with your significant other, go to a baseball game (Go Dodgers!) or something like that. Be outside and active.
 
Originally posted by tonbo


"Music hath charms to soothe the savage breast....".....or to get blood pumping through it, no?

tonbo,
It is so beautiful! oh, I love it. I love the way that you put such a chaming touch at the end with a simple "no?"
Bravo!!!



Min :asian:
 
Originally posted by nightingale8472

treat your body like you treat your mind...

if you're studying and find yourself unmotivated to the point of boredom and pages looking blurry, you take a study break.

Do the same for martial arts. Take a week off. (but no more than a week, and have your teacher call you on monday to remind you to get your tail back into the school) If you're bored and not enjoying it, you won't put forth your best effort, and are probably just wasting your time anyway. Take a little vacation and come back refreshed.

Use the time you would be in class to do other important stress relieving things (DON"T JUST WATCH TV). Take the family out somewhere... spend some time with your significant other, go to a baseball game (Go Dodgers!) or something like that. Be outside and active.

Good stuff ~!
Lately I know I get bored .. 5 nights /week.. same ole same ole.. and have to spark myself into getting back on track.. my partner Billy and I work on Long 4 for awhile.. roll our eyes at each other.. do a few tecs .. float around the other groups for a bit.. come back do some more eye rolling and finally class is over.. It's not that the class is boring.. it's trying to assimilate all the info we have to and no where to use it if that makes any sense.. I'm in a rambling mood I guess.. :)
I know we are all looking forward to Mr Conatser's seminar next week so this is good :)

I think Burn out happens to everyone one time or another.. so nothing to fret about.. just don't take too long a break.. my weekends are generally enough to give me a rest :)

Tess
 
I have found that actually refining and DEFINING the techniques of a form or series of techniques can make a difference.


At many levels, pre and post burn out, it is just poorly going through the motions, I observed this the other night with two advanced Kenpo students (hint-hint).

If you have the basic movements down,

Focus on accuracy of techniques (DEFINING A SPECIFIC TARGET)

Placement of your feet around your partner/opponent

Sensitivity Drills (make physical contact PRECISELY) doing the particular motions very slowly and FEELING what it does, or should be doing. Like the push hands stuff done in many Chinese styles.

Regardless of lineage, or skill level, going back to the basics and repeating them until you are in a numb condition will make the more advanced motions simplier and autonomous.


Off my soapbox, and back to the dungeon.:asian:
 
Originally posted by Stick Dummy

I have found that actually refining and DEFINING the techniques of a form or series of techniques can make a difference.


At many levels, pre and post burn out, it is just poorly going through the motions, I observed this the other night with two advanced Kenpo students (hint-hint).

If you have the basic movements down,

Focus on accuracy of techniques (DEFINING A SPECIFIC TARGET)

Placement of your feet around your partner/opponent

Sensitivity Drills (make physical contact PRECISELY) doing the particular motions very slowly and FEELING what it does, or should be doing. Like the push hands stuff done in many Chinese styles.

Regardless of lineage, or skill level, going back to the basics and repeating them until you are in a numb condition will make the more advanced motions simplier and autonomous.


Off my soapbox, and back to the dungeon.:asian:

hint taken :)

I know on Tues & Thurs, Billy and I are pretty wiped out after teaching over at the college.. and on Mon,Wed and Fri after dealing with the kids class.. there's not much chance to have a breather before Line up time for us.. We don't get to regroup into a learning mindset from a teaching one, if that makes any sense.
I know Bill has talked to me lately about it and how he's concentrating on teaching the college kids and Kodi (his protege child student) and how his brain is fried on our own level.. Hence going through the motions without much else.
And with me it's difficult to get into'it' when Seig is busy with another group and I just kinda end up sitting there trying to get my bearings..
Calgon~!! Take me away!~!!
 
Tessmania,

Nah not youse.............


Wed, when doing tecs with two "guys", trust me I understand the fried mind part.

Its time to work on the third eye stuff, digging deep and honing whats already known to razor sharp keeness.
 

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