Self Defense vs Potentially Rabid Dog

Tez3

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Okay I've had a look through a lot of your posts and in my opinion you're full of it. First the taco store robbery thing now this....plus all this on your mmk (mickey mouse Kung fu) but can't actually show your style apart from a few pictures of you posing in a Bruce lee stance and watching your friends spar in the back yard. It seems like you're just a guy who couldn't handle proper martial art training so quit every style and now you invent your own style and pretend to know enough to teach (but only your family of course...can't risk a real martial artist turning up ai)

Do we really need this? If you don't like what he says put him on ignore and then we can get back to a good discussion.
 

oaktree

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Mou meng, I don't troll you I ask questions and correct you if you post something incorrectly there is a difference.
 

Brian R. VanCise

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One thing I know for sure is that if you are up against a dog it is probably going to be painful. They are so quick, so very fast in comparison to us. My dog is around 85 lbs. He looks like a wolf and frankly if he doesn't want me to touch him I can't and I am a pretty fast person. So the advice above about getting something between you and it is very sound. Having a distance weapon would be very, very useful in this situation.
 

drop bear

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And just a FYI.

Most dogs turn tail and run when sprayed with a fire extinguisher. Actually I have never seen one not tuck his tail and run hide after being sprayed.

We use them when hitting houses.

Or a vacuum cleaner.
 

JowGaWolf

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We don't have rabies in the UK due to the stringent efforts to keep it out. Dog attacks are still no laughing matter, we've had a few deaths from them, not just children either.
It's common in some states in the US. However, cases usually involve a fox or Racoon spreading it to a dog. I've heard more cases of rabid foxes and racoons than dogs. Those are only the cases that make the news. Georgia gets around 373 cases a year. Texas is around 683 cases a year Georgia dwarfs most states in rabies.

Some people get it from bats. We have a lot of people here so it's rare in terms of the likelihood that you will get it. 300+ cases seems like a lot but it's very small in comparison to the state population. we have a lot of wildlife here and politicians see cleaning up rabies as not being worth spending the necessary money to get rid of it. every state would have to do the same.
 

Tez3

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Rabies here was eradicated in 1922 apart from bat rabies which is actually a different strain and very rare in the UK and for which, luckily, there's a vaccine against bat rabies (Some bats in Europe carry a rabies virus called European Bat Lyssavirus (EBLV). EBLV is not the classical rabies which is usually associated with dogs; classical rabies has never been recorded in a native European bat species... from the Bat Conservation Trust) There's been human deaths from rabies here when people have been bitten by usually a rabid dog abroad, I've seen film of someone with it and it's horrendous.
 

eddiecharette

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Experts say in such situations one should stay calm and walk away rather than run. It is wise to avoid confrontation with packs. In the case of a normal dog chase, sending calming signals would be signaling the dog your peaceful intent (yawning, licking your lips, avoiding eye contact, standing sideways..). Staring, running or yelling would be disastrous. Crouch low and feign picking small rock as the last resort.
If the attack seems unavoidable, use an object-a backpack, a stick or say a shirt wrapped around your forearm to fend off the attack.
Reach a hospital as fast as possible, get rabies shots, and get the bites treated against infection.
Past week, my dog was chasing a raccoon in the yard. He finally had the intruder defeated. But I was worried for my doggie since raccoons carry a lot of viruses causing rabies. To be on the safer side, I sought guidance from wildlife removal services toronto on the possibilities of getting rabies.
A touch or their saliva is contagious and any contact with an open wound might be very risky.
 

JR 137

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Don't get me started on "Old Yeller". Saw that movie when I was six. They shot the dog? I mean, really, they shot the fricken' dog? And Walt Disney made that movie for kids? (like me at the time) And he already had Bambi's mama shot. The sick F.

F Walt Disney, and the billions he rode in on..

Thanks. I have both movies rented and sitting on the table ready to be watched. Just ruined it for me.

What's next, you're going to tell me Bruce Willis is really the dead guy?
 

tim po

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So a few weeks back, I was talking to some of my brothers in security about an encounter I had with a stray pittbull on one of the most dangerous streets in the downtown area where I live. I was doing security at a Mexican nightclub at 1:00am so people were drinking inside, having a good time. I was patrolling the perimeter and also making sure nobody had any weapons. There was a grill outside the club where families were sitting at picnic benches. At one side of the building was a dark parking lot with no cameras overlooking a ghetto project neighborhood over the other side of a broken chainlink fence. I was doing my normal routine, walking the perimeter (staying away from building corners as I took wide turns around them). I had a badge, a flashlight, some spray, a knife and a phone. Mind you my job is usually 90% boredom and 10% chaos. On this particular night, however, I was caught offguard by a stray pittbull in the parking lot who appeared to have blood all over its neck and body. I immediately became nervous, and asked the patrons to take their families inside. As the potentially wounded animal approached the entrance to the club, I flicked on my strobe light and started approaching him. The dog had milky white eyes with foam on its snout and chin, with bloody canines peaking behind a devious snarl. I was actually scared for a moment, no lie. But soon I relaxed and started approaching the potentially rabid pitt, yelling at him to "Shrew! Scram! Get outta here!" and soon it took off back into the shadows. I stuck around for a while, then started doing patrols again. I shined my flashlight into the dark corners and shrub areas around the parking lot and behind the club, but I didn't see anything suspicious. Ever since that night, however, I've been wondering about it. What if you are confronted with a stray, potentially rabid animal on the job? What are some ways you could defend yourself, and the people around? What are your thoughts? How could I have handled the situation even better? Just curious to see what others say.

I once saw a man ask Dr. Masaaki Hatsumi, Soke of the Bujinkan, what a "ninja" would do if attacked by a pit bull.
His response? a faint but audible 'clicking' sound, accompanied by the mimicked hand motions of pumping a shotgun. :D
(someone else asked him how a ninja would fight in outer space...he said, "he would fart.")
 

Oily Dragon

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Hung Kuen actually has a technique for fighting a mad dog. It's pretty ingenious.

You bait the dog to bite your hand, and then nail it in the guts with your foot. According to traditional tales, Wong Fei Hung himself did this in a crowded market once and put a rabid dog down. The technique became one of the most famous in all of kung fu history.

I've never tested this one on human or dog, but it seems like it would work.

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Steve

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Hung Kuen actually has a technique for fighting a mad dog. It's pretty ingenious.

You bait the dog to bite your hand, and then nail it in the guts with your foot. According to traditional tales, Wong Fei Hung himself did this in a crowded market once and put a rabid dog down. The technique became one of the most famous in all of kung fu history.

I've never tested this one on human or dog, but it seems like it would work.

View attachment 27757
Better not miss.
 

mograph

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So, rabid dogs are basically small, strong, fast zombies with pointy teeth?

But seriously, we got a lot of nasty fear-based teaching on rabies when I was a kid, but had forgotten it. Thanks all, for the reminders. Yow.
 

Flying Crane

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Hung Kuen actually has a technique for fighting a mad dog. It's pretty ingenious.

You bait the dog to bite your hand, and then nail it in the guts with your foot. According to traditional tales, Wong Fei Hung himself did this in a crowded market once and put a rabid dog down. The technique became one of the most famous in all of kung fu history.

I've never tested this one on human or dog, but it seems like it would work.

View attachment 27757
This did not happen, if the dog in fact was rabid. At that time there was no rabies vaccination. If he had done that, guaranteed he would have died from rabies.

What you describe is extremely dangerous, due to the seriousness of rabies. I suppose one could get the vaccine quickly afterward, but that is seriously risky. And a rabid dog is not rational, will not respond to pain. You need to kill it or it will probably rip you up once it gets ahold of your arm.
 

Dirty Dog

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This did not happen, if the dog in fact was rabid. At that time there was no rabies vaccination. If he had done that, guaranteed he would have died from rabies.
Not really. While rabies has a mortality rate of something like 99%, it's not 100%. So not a guarantee. And the transmission rate is much lower. I want to say less than 20%. I can look it up if anybody really cares, but it's not all that high.
What you describe is extremely dangerous, due to the seriousness of rabies. I suppose one could get the vaccine quickly afterward, but that is seriously risky.
Not so much if we assume a first world country. Treatment with immunoglobulin and vaccine is as close to 100% effective as makes no difference.
I'm not saying anyone should be careless, but in our world, things like rabies and tetanus just are not huge concerns. Just get the vaccines as indicated and don't fret.
Honestly, I'd be more concerned with regular infections. Bites are filthy. I've never seen anyone contract rabies. I have seen plenty with wound infections.
And a rabid dog is not rational, will not respond to pain. You need to kill it or it will probably rip you up once it gets ahold of your arm.
Certainly no disagreement there.
Fortunately, rabid dogs are vanishingly rare today. The real exposure risk if from things like bats, skunks, raccoons, foxes...
 

Flying Crane

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Not really. While rabies has a mortality rate of something like 99%, it's not 100%. So not a guarantee. And the transmission rate is much lower. I want to say less than 20%. I can look it up if anybody really cares, but it's not all that high.

Not so much if we assume a first world country. Treatment with immunoglobulin and vaccine is as close to 100% effective as makes no difference.
I'm not saying anyone should be careless, but in our world, things like rabies and tetanus just are not huge concerns. Just get the vaccines as indicated and don't fret.
Honestly, I'd be more concerned with regular infections. Bites are filthy. I've never seen anyone contract rabies. I have seen plenty with wound infections.

Certainly no disagreement there.
Fortunately, rabid dogs are vanishingly rare today. The real exposure risk if from things like bats, skunks, raccoons, foxes...
Those who survived rabies unvaccinated did so with extensive and intense hospital care (like about a year) and ended with severe brain damage, essentially a vegetative state. So yeah, a few have survived, kind of. Without modern hospitalization, it does not happen at all. So whatever Wong Fei Hung might have done in old China, I do not believe he offered his arm to a rabid dog to bite him.

Yes, risk of transmission is averaged to about 15% but can range from 1-60 depending on state of illness of the animal, number of bites, depth of bites, location of bites. But my point is simple: you take this very seriously. Rabies is relatively uncommon in the US, but more common in other areas. But regardless, you dont take chances with it.
 

bill miller

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One thing I know for sure is that if you are up against a dog it is probably going to be painful. They are so quick, so very fast in comparison to us. My dog is around 85 lbs. He looks like a wolf and frankly if he doesn't want me to touch him I can't and I am a pretty fast person. So the advice above about getting something between you and it is very sound. Having a distance weapon would be very, very useful in this situation.
You are right on the money! One of my sons has a very large lab that "mauls" me when I go visit.She is really quite friendly, and rather goofy, and I could image what she could do if she was really pissed off!
 

Oily Dragon

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This did not happen, if the dog in fact was rabid. At that time there was no rabies vaccination. If he had done that, guaranteed he would have died from rabies.

What you describe is extremely dangerous, due to the seriousness of rabies. I suppose one could get the vaccine quickly afterward, but that is seriously risky. And a rabid dog is not rational, will not respond to pain. You need to kill it or it will probably rip you up once it gets ahold of your arm.
I don't know if the dog was literally, medically rabid. There would have been no way to tell back then, so I could have just been a "mad dog".

And yes, in the folk tale, the dog was dead before it touched the arm (you raise the arm, it's not static, above your head).
 

Oily Dragon

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Those who survived rabies unvaccinated did so with extensive and intense hospital care (like about a year) and ended with severe brain damage, essentially a vegetative state. So yeah, a few have survived, kind of. Without modern hospitalization, it does not happen at all. So whatever Wong Fei Hung might have done in old China, I do not believe he offered his arm to a rabid dog to bite him.

Yes, risk of transmission is averaged to about 15% but can range from 1-60 depending on state of illness of the animal, number of bites, depth of bites, location of bites. But my point is simple: you take this very seriously. Rabies is relatively uncommon in the US, but more common in other areas. But regardless, you dont take chances with it.
I should have mentioned this critical piece of folk history:

The dog was charging him at the time, the sun was high in the sky, but the kick left no shadow.
 
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