Range Awareness: General

kruzada

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modarnis said:
Modern Arnis tends to be a closer range system and places a great deal of emphasis on translation to empty hand self defense. It is a blended system.

Your point of view is understandable being that GM Remy placed a great emphasis on Corto range at his seminars and in his tapes. GM Remy developed many new Corto techniques and Tapi-Tapi here in the U.S, but much of the Modern Arnis curriculum taught in the Philippines www.imafp.com covers Largo, Media and Corto techniques (including Tapi-Tapi) evenly without overemphasizing the use any one particular range. Emphasis on a particular range differs among instructors, but in general Modern Arnis is a very comprehensive system.

Much of what I teach from Modern Arnis covers Largo, Media, and Corto. Largo range techniques are taught from the beginner levels to the advanced ranks, while Media techniques are added for Intermediate students, and advanced students are taught Corto techniques in addition to what they already know.

Our Black Belts must demonstrate an ability to flow seemlessly between all the ranges, adapting to the situation i.e. single attacker (with solo baston, doble baston, espada y daga or knife) and/or multiple attackers with different weapon combinations, while the defender is armed with similar or different weapon combinations.

-Rich Acosta
 

arnisador

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My recollection is that there was more emphasis on largo techniques in the 1980s, but that the emphasis on it steadily decreased over the years.
 
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kruzada

kruzada

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In the Philippines the Modern Arnis practitioners train in Largo, Media and Corto range respectively. I have very little exposure to how Modern Arnis is taught elsewhere.

The Masters in the P.I. teach the original curriculum developed by GM Remy and the modern innovations developed by GM Remy. They also have preserved many unique classical techniques of Arnis from various sources.

The IMAFP Masters have a very high proficiency in advanced Tapi-Tapi. GM Remy returned and trained the Masters there, and promoted many of his students who remained loyal to him after so many years.

What I posted about my students, is how I train them in my system Kuntaw Kali Kruzada. Our group is affiliated with IMAFP, but we teach our own curriculum which includes other FMA styles/systems.

Rich Acosta
 

MJS

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kruzada said:
Our Black Belts must demonstrate an ability to flow seemlessly between all the ranges, adapting to the situation

-Rich Acosta

Very good point. Often I see people going on the assumption that you will always be able to be the aggressor, always pressing forward, driving the opponent back. However, what happens when the opponent decides to take an angle or press the defender?

As you said, being able to adapt in all ranges is very important, but often overlooked.

Mike
 

Rich Parsons

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kruzada said:
Your point of view is understandable being that GM Remy placed a great emphasis on Corto range at his seminars and in his tapes. GM Remy developed many new Corto techniques and Tapi-Tapi here in the U.S, but much of the Modern Arnis curriculum taught in the Philippines www.imafp.com covers Largo, Media and Corto techniques (including Tapi-Tapi) evenly without overemphasizing the use any one particular range. Emphasis on a particular range differs among instructors, but in general Modern Arnis is a very comprehensive system.

Much of what I teach from Modern Arnis covers Largo, Media, and Corto. Largo range techniques are taught from the beginner levels to the advanced ranks, while Media techniques are added for Intermediate students, and advanced students are taught Corto techniques in addition to what they already know.

Our Black Belts must demonstrate an ability to flow seemlessly between all the ranges, adapting to the situation i.e. single attacker (with solo baston, doble baston, espada y daga or knife) and/or multiple attackers with different weapon combinations, while the defender is armed with similar or different weapon combinations.

-Rich Acosta

As Jeff stated in the 80's it was different then the high concentration of the late 90's. I would also have to state in the 70's as well it was like what is describe in the above post by Rich Acosta.

Some of what people forget is that Dr Randy Shea, Master of Tapi-Tapi; Brian Zawilinski, Master of Tapi-Tapi, and All six of the Datu's had started in the 80's with their training or held rank in the 80's as well. (* Of course there were others including myself, I only listed a few to make a point. *) The Professor aka GM Remy had taught these people and others the largo and medio and corto from earlier. He would show them new things, and occasionally change his sparring drills to add in new technqiues and skill sets. This makes an assumption that maybe all his black belts were expected to continue on teaching the old techniques as well as learnign the new ones. If someone came in in the 90's only and had only the Tapi-Tapi Drill set to look at then one might think that Modern Arnis was corto only or concentrated on that area.

No dsirespect meant to anyone posting here or to names I did not mention.
 

modarnis

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>>Modern Arnis tends to be a closer range system and places a great deal of emphasis on translation to empty hand self defense. It is a blended system. >>

Just so the record is clear, my above statement does not say that Modern Arnis is exclusively a close range system, nor should it imply it. With all due respect, that was an out of context snipit of my response to a question about differences between kali, escrima, arnis and what makes different systems different.

I am certainly aware of the broad range of techniques and fighting ranges in Modern Arnis, first training with the Professor in the mid 1980's, then resuming my training in 1992 until present.

My post was merely trying to describe how Modern Arnis was different than many exclusivelly blade or stick systems in that Professor Presas placed a high degree of emphasis in his last decade of teaching on empty hand translation of his techniques
 

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modarnis said:
>>Modern Arnis tends to be a closer range system and places a great deal of emphasis on translation to empty hand self defense. It is a blended system. >>

Just so the record is clear, my above statement does not say that Modern Arnis is exclusively a close range system, nor should it imply it. With all due respect, that was an out of context snipit of my response to a question about differences between kali, escrima, arnis and what makes different systems different.

I am certainly aware of the broad range of techniques and fighting ranges in Modern Arnis, first training with the Professor in the mid 1980's, then resuming my training in 1992 until present.

My post was merely trying to describe how Modern Arnis was different than many exclusivelly blade or stick systems in that Professor Presas placed a high degree of emphasis in his last decade of teaching on empty hand translation of his techniques

Brett,

While I know you and how long you have been around I spoke in third person so as to not make it about you. Like, I said no disrespect meant to you or others.

And good explaination follow up by you, thanks!
 

Lobo

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Well, i believe that long range attacks are useful for untrained opponents (people who have no clue how to fight). But closer attacks are better for more skilled opponents. Well, from observation, this is the case against tkd, kung fu, wushu and other striking arts. I would go long ranged against grappling arts, but when they attempt to takedown, i would evade or clinch/knee/elbow them. I'm inexperienced, but from a logical view point that sounds reasonable.
 
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kruzada

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Lobo said:
Well, i believe that long range attacks are useful for untrained opponents (people who have no clue how to fight). But closer attacks are better for more skilled opponents.

Everyone is entitled to their opinion, but what you have posted is mostly inaccurate.

Many FMA practitioners have a preferred range, but it is a known fact that many notable Grandmasters and Masters of the FMA prefer to fight in Largo (Long) range, while others prefer Media or Corto.

All the Grandmasters and Masters in the P.I. are incredibly skilled and experienced fighters in their own right, and I would never discount the usefullness of a range nor the assumed proficiency it would take to master any range of fighting especially in the FMA.

Just FYI, Grandmaster Jose G. Mena's style Doblete Rapelon is mainly a largo mano system, but it does also include media and corto techniques. He was one of the most respected Grandmasters in the P.I. and was also a sparring partner of the famed Felicisimo Dizon and GM Antonio Illustrisimo, aside from being one of Angel Cabales' teachers. Grandmaster Giron's system also includes many largo mano techniques, if I'm not mistaken.

IMHO Every range in the FMA deserves due consideration and respect as parts of a larger whole which are all equally difficult to master. There is no superior range of combat, just as there is no superior style of fighting.

-Rich Acosta
 

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