Questions and then some

K-man

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Got another question! :)(Though may be an ignorant question)
At a siminar I was invited to we were doing a few basic small circle jujutsu... jijitsu? I dont remember spelling but my wuestion was; why is it called SMALL CIRCLE juijitsu
I assumed because it was because the wrist/finger locks we went over didnt involve a lot of movement on the user's side but I could be mistaken
'Small Circle Jujitsu' is the name coined by Wally Jay for his form of martial art that was derived from many other sources.

Basically it is a system of training that can be applied across a broad range of martial arts that involve grappling.

Small Circle Jujitsu The History of Small Circle Jujitsu - Small Circle Jujitsu
 
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donald1

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another question please :)...

just got my new kung fu uniform, yippee!(black with white trim)
but to get to the point here... i know in karate they call their uniform "gi"
and i think TKD students call their uniforms "dobak" but my question is...
what do kung fu people call their uniform??
i was looking on the internet i found a few different forrums where the question was asked 1 person used the term "saam" and another person used the term "Xunlian Fu" though im sure the 2nd one is wrong but thought id mention it just in case
thought id ask here because maybe someone here might know
,thanks
 
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donald1

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I got some questions... first questions is 5 elements (earth, wood, fire, metal, and water) and I was looking at a chart that showed both creation and destructive cycle (I think I have the two memorized but wanted to see if correct)
Creation; fire, earth, metal, water, wood
Destruction; fire, metal, wood, earth, water

Second question Chinese termonology... I don't know Chinese ive been working on a tai chi form the form has the number 10 in it, what is 10 in chinese also my new liuwei form (the instructor calls it "32 step" what is 32 and step in chinese. He stated it should be mandarin

Last question... he said theres different types of chinese he mentioned mandarin can you list a few other names (just the names dont need to go in depth answer unless you just feel like it)
 

Xue Sheng

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Metal produces water
Water produces Wood
Wood produces Fire
Fire produces Earth
Earth produces Metal

Metal defeats Wood
Wood defeats Earth
Earth defeats Water
Water defeats Fire
Fire defeats Metal

10 = = sh穩
32 = 銝鈭 = Sn sh穩 癡r
Step = 甇 = B羅

A few Chinese Dialects
Mandarin, Yue (Cantonese), Hakka, Wu
 
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donald1

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Ive been wondering this question for a while, in the goju forms I practice they all have bow before starting them. But while practicing kung fu forms there were some had no bow(im pretty sure thats what he said) my question, why?
 

K-man

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Ive been wondering this question for a while, in the goju forms I practice they all have bow before starting them. But while practicing kung fu forms there were some had no bow(im pretty sure thats what he said) my question, why?
Good question. I've never even thought about it. Normally bowing is a sign of respect and in a way of saying thank you. So before training, (bow) "thank you for agreeing to train with me" and after training, (bow) "thank you for training with me". We do the same in Aikido. It's a Japanese thing.

Now, when it comes to kata, I'm not quite sure. Certainly in competition it has two reasons. Firstly it is a bow to the judges (respect) and it also signifies the beginning of the performance. Likewise to signify the end and a thank you to the judge for watching.

In the normal performance of the kata, in training, we don't normally bow at the beginning but we bow at the end. For me it is probably because before performing the kata you empty the mind. Performing the kata you are working 'in the kata', that is the kata is doing what it means for you. When the kata is finished you come back to reality. The bow at the end is a kind of release.

Of course, when you are learning the kata and have an instructor with you, then it is like a training partner where you are bowing to each other as described above.
 

Chris Parker

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Rei ni hajimari rei ni owaru (蝷潦怠整蝷潦怎).

(Budo) begins with a bow, and ends with a bow The Budo Bum Budo Begins And Ends With Rei at least, that's a Japanese art perspective as for the kung fu systems, well, I suppose you'd have to ask the practitioners of the systems themselves to determine why they do or don't feature any particular aspect.
 

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In the Mugai ryu, and the Zen Nihon Battodo Renmei kata, the only time a bow is done is if the kata begins from a different direction than forward. You bow before turning to the required starting direction. Most of the kata begin from forward position, so there is no bow in the majority of them.
 
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donald1

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I got 2 questions please!

If my knoledge is correct originally cma martial arts didnt have belts, when did they start introducing them into styles?

Ive noticed in some cma forms And some of the forms have techniques where you lift your leg (maybe a kick) and you have toes facing down
Why toes facing down and not up?
 

K-man

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I don't know about the first so I'll leave that to the CMA guys but the second question is interesting. As far as I can recall, without going though every kata, we have just one 'kick' with the toes down and in the bunkai it is not a kick at all.
 
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donald1

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Just 2 questions... about cma terms (Im not very familiar with them so I may be off on them) my first question, where do they come up with these terms and form names? I think the instructor called one term golden rooster stands on one foot and forms like monkey steals peach?? Ive also heard it called white ape steals peach(wonder if its a big ape or a small ape) to me there are some terms that seem strange

Second question in class were going over a form and reached a point where it felt wrong. I knew we were leaving a few moves out but the instructor didnt think so. I usually am uncertain about things but on this situation im 100 % certain that a part was being left out but I dropped the topic completly and didnt argue. I dont think he would get mad but it seemed like the right thing to do. (Im sure one of the other instructors will mention it)
My question Was that the best choice on my behalf?
 

Xue Sheng

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Question 1

Translations from the Chinese idiom, some good some bad.


Question 2

Been there done that.

Talk privately and he/she may or may not admit it. If they do admit it ask why, if they dont then it is up to you whether or not you want to push the issue or drop it.

My first sifu did that with a Taiji form. I took him aside afterwards and asked him about it. He first insisted that I remembered it wrong. Then I told him that if he liked, I could bring in the old video I have of him doing the form next week and show him. He then admitted he changed it to make it easier so students would stick with the form
 
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donald1

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Random question, what does tae kwon do translate? In a lot of karate schools "do" means way of. Yet tae kwan do is korean I could imagine it might use korean terms yet. It was influenced greatly by shotokan karate.
 

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Random question, what does tae kwon do translate? In a lot of karate schools "do" means way of. Yet tae kwan do is korean I could imagine it might use korean terms yet. It was influenced greatly by shotokan karate.

Taekwondo translates as 'the way of kicking and punching'.


Sent from an old fashioned 300 baud acoustic modem by whistling into the handset. Not TapaTalk. Really.
 

Kung Fu Wang

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Ive noticed in some cma forms And some of the forms have techniques where you lift your leg (maybe a kick) and you have toes facing down
Why toes facing down and not up?
When your toes is facing

- down, it's called "spring". You use your "instep" to kick the groin (low kick), or chin (high kick). The kicking path will be an "upward curve".
- up, it's called "kick". You use the "ball of the foot" to kick the belly/chest (middle kick). The kicking path will be an "downward curve".

Since all Kung Fu guys wear shoes, even the toes up kick can be seen as toes "straight" kick. It's the kicking path whether it's an "upward curve", or "downward curve" that you should look for.

Also most of the Kung Fu kicks don't pull the kicking leg back. The kicking foot will land as far as you can. This will make the "downward curve" more noticeable. This will serve the purpose of "closing the gap" and "use kick to set up punch".

In the following traditional CMA clips, the "downward curve" can be seen. You probably won't see this in the modern Chinese Wushu training.


 

Kung Fu Wang

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If my knoledge is correct originally cma martial arts didnt have belts, when did they start introducing them into styles?
As far as I know, the Shuai Chiao (Chinese wrestling) may be the only CMA system that had belt ranking in the ancient time. During the Ching dynasty, the Chinese wrestlers in " (Shan Pu Ying) - camp for good wrestlers" would be divided into 3 different ranks,

- the 1st grade "隞 (Pu Hu) - attacking tiger",
- the 2nd grade "隞 (Pu Hu) - attacking tiger",
- the 3rd grade "隞 (Pu Hu) - attacking tiger".

They would draw different salary.

San_Pu_Yin.jpg
 
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donald1

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I got 2 questions same subject;

In class generally a lower belt would be preffered not to correct a higher rank.
I know its showing respect and I personally never had trouble in this area (I have noticed some people make this mistake before but very rare though). My question exactly how does it show respect?

Also what are your thoughts on the subject?(I ask this question because I like to see other peoples perspectives)
 
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