Question for Dans and the instructors by any other name.

TSDTexan

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Front push/thrust kick or Chudan mae-geri kekomi from a front leg of a back stance.

Or if you prefer, starting from a front stance making a sliding rear leg (step up) into the mae-geri kekomi with the front leg.

Q:
Which do you following variations would or do you instruct your students to do:

After chambering followed by striking with the heel of the foot, begin thrusting the hip, while simultaniously dropping the knee (thus straightening into full extension, making the leg horizontal from hip to target) with heel on target's middle section?

The striking area of the foot (heel) being the same as a Chudan Yoko Geri Kekomi (sidekick) or alternately an instep stomp kick.
kekomi Okazaki.jpg


mae-geri_kekomi.gif


Or

thrusting the hip, while pushing a snapped kick into the target so that you are striking with the ball of the foot. (Snap a front kick, making a horizontal line between hip, ankle, and ball of the toe, using hip rotation and thrust to push into the target)

This kick is a modified front snap kick. Foot chambering and return to back stance or cat stance, or even sliding back into the front stance.
images.png


oigeri.jpg
 
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Dirty Dog

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Both. They're both useful in slightly different circumstances.
For example, the "push" wiht the heel is useful if you're trying to create distance.
 
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TSDTexan

TSDTexan

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Both. They're both useful in slightly different circumstances.
For example, the "push" wiht the heel is useful if you're trying to create distance.

I concur. And the ball of the foot creates a tighter or more concentrated impact, which would be very helpful if one is trying to strike a pressure point area. Much akin to an Extended Middle Knuckle Punch.
 
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TSDTexan

TSDTexan

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Hey, Sifu Danny, since you are a WC practitioner, I have a question for you. Actually two. Maybe three.
1. What do you think of this video
from a technical standpoint as a WC guy. Is he accurate, or do you disagree with him?

2. What is your Wing Chun lineage?
Leung Sheung, Lok Yiu, Chu Shong Tin, Wong Sheung Leung, Ip Ching?

3. Do you like boudin?
 

Danny T

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Hey, Sifu Danny, since you are a WC practitioner, I have a question for you. Actually two. Maybe three.
1. What do you think of this video
Clear and concise. They did a nice job.

from a technical standpoint as a WC guy. Is he accurate, or do you disagree with him?
Accurate? As to what he described and showed. Yes.
Disagree? No, however we have other aspects and ways which are quicker and more powerful depending on the situation, range, and target.

2. What is your Wing Chun lineage?
Leung Sheung, Lok Yiu, Chu Shong Tin, Wong Sheung Leung, Ip Ching?
Jiu Wan (Yip Man's wing chun brother under Chan Wah Shun)
3. Do you like boudin?
Yes, crawfish and hog's head cheese as well.
 
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TSDTexan

TSDTexan

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Clear and concise. They did a nice job.


Accurate? As to what he described and showed. Yes.
Disagree? No, however we have other aspects and ways which are quicker and more powerful depending on the situation, range, and target.


Jiu Wan (Yip Man's wing chun brother under Chan Wah Shun)

Yes, crawfish and hog's head cheese as well.

Dude, Sifu, You rock.

So, Your branch founder just like Ip Man studied under Chan Wah-shun. That's pretty cool. I think you are the first guy I have ever had a chance to chat with that wasn't a member of Ip Man's branch.
 
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Tony Dismukes

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I'll use either kicking methodology and probably a couple more besides, depending on the specific needs of the moment.

I'm not sure which method I would teach first to beginners. I primarily teach grappling, so I haven't had to put together a standard striking curriculum.
 

Chrisoro

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Both have value and should be taught. I cannot remember the last time I consciously hit anyone with my heel in sparring with any kind of kick.
 

Chrisoro

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You never throw sidekicks when you spar?

Not very often, anymore. If I do, I try to hit with the blade of the foot. In practice, I use mostly roundkicks and front pushkicks, as that I what I generally are able to hit with consistently.

Very occationally, if I want to show of a bit, I trow a spinning back kick, trying to hit with the heel(dwichok) or a spinning hook kick generally trying to hit with either the flat of the foot(balbadak) or the balls of the toes(apchook), but in all honesty, I seldom hit with any of them. Don't spar at all with color belts, so that may be the reason, but I'm honestly not a very good kicker for having black belts in two kick-heavy arts. :)
 
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Drose427

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Our front is a push kick

In sparring we probably wont get onto anyone for flipping, but during practice or forms we will

We generally connect with the ball, and thrust straight out. Like, "Punching with your foot"

I personally like throwing my sidekicks like Im starting a front kick, slips them in a good bit more
 

Koshiki

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Both. Most of our front kicks are fast, impact oriented, and use the ball of the foot. Occasionally, we do thrusting, pushing kicks with the heal.

Two different kicks, though...
 

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