Ok, this is my first karate belt fight, any general tips?

Moz bruce Lee

White Belt
Joined
May 30, 2015
Messages
8
Reaction score
0
Osu, i have been practicing kyokushin for 3 months and uhhh 7days...my sensei tells me that i'm progressing fast (Hah!). But he doesnt have a slightest idea that my legs have been shaking since he last told me about my belt fight this friday!!!!!
Well, i want to know the good ways to put up a good fight! Funny, that i have been practicing basics but i dont know how to apply them...some sensei he is...tsk tsk! Guys please? (some really good tips and all)
 

OldManJim

Orange Belt
Joined
Jan 25, 2015
Messages
64
Reaction score
8
I'm not sure what you mean by belt fight? Is this an in class thing to advance to the next belt? Are you entering a local tournament? Is it the first time you are going to spar in class? I'm not sure what you're meaning, but I can tell you from my previous experience several years ago as an intermediate belt in a stand up style a few hints. If your sensei is putting you in a tournament or sparring match or some kind of belt promotion thing it will be entirely different for each in that ...if it's a tournament you at face a different style..if it's a belt promotion and he is legitimate(I'm saying this because I'm not sure exactly what you're meaning) then he isn't going to let the other person beat the crap out of you...he's just looking to see what you know. I know kyokushin is a hard style and maybe that's the norm.
 

lklawson

Grandmaster
Joined
Feb 3, 2005
Messages
5,036
Reaction score
1,680
Location
Huber Heights, OH
Osu, i have been practicing kyokushin for 3 months and uhhh 7days...my sensei tells me that i'm progressing fast (Hah!). But he doesnt have a slightest idea that my legs have been shaking since he last told me about my belt fight this friday!!!!!
Well, i want to know the good ways to put up a good fight! Funny, that i have been practicing basics but i dont know how to apply them...some sensei he is...tsk tsk! Guys please? (some really good tips and all)
I recommend that you punch and kick the opponent as hard as you are allowed and prevent receiving punches and kicks by managing the distance and timing through footwork and movement, and "swatting" away any strikes which you are unable to manage through footwork and movement.

Yes, you read that right: "Hit him. Don't get hit."

Look, sparring isn't about being a Power Ranger. It's about settling the fundamentals into your automatic responses.

Peace favor your sword,
Kirk
 

donald1

Senior Master
Joined
Jan 20, 2013
Messages
3,538
Reaction score
818
For starters... im pretty sure its not good to critisize the instructor.:eek::rolleyes:

The only thing I can think of now is practice, practice and when you get tired practice a little bit more.
 

JowGaWolf

Sr. Grandmaster
MT Mentor
Joined
Aug 3, 2015
Messages
14,063
Reaction score
5,985
To be honest there's nothing that anyone can say that will help you since this is your first fight. Ask the same question again after your first fight.
 
OP
Moz bruce Lee

Moz bruce Lee

White Belt
Joined
May 30, 2015
Messages
8
Reaction score
0
I'm not sure what you mean by belt fight? Is this an in class thing to advance to the next belt? Are you entering a local tournament? Is it the first time you are going to spar in class? I'm not sure what you're meaning, but I can tell you from my previous experience several years ago as an intermediate belt in a stand up style a few hints. If your sensei is putting you in a tournament or sparring match or some kind of belt promotion thing it will be entirely different for each in that ...if it's a tournament you at face a different style..if it's a belt promotion and he is legitimate(I'm saying this because I'm not sure exactly what you're meaning) then he isn't going to let the other person beat the crap out of you...he's just looking to see what you know. I know kyokushin is a hard style and maybe that's the norm.
Dude it's just a belt promotion fight.. The guy I'll be fighting will be of same style (someone from my school)... Well yeah it's my first time putting my basics in use!
 
OP
Moz bruce Lee

Moz bruce Lee

White Belt
Joined
May 30, 2015
Messages
8
Reaction score
0
I recommend that you punch and kick the opponent as hard as you are allowed and prevent receiving punches and kicks by managing the distance and timing through footwork and movement, and "swatting" away any strikes which you are unable to manage through footwork and movement.

Yes, you read that right: "Hit him. Don't get hit."

Look, sparring isn't about being a Power Ranger. It's about settling the fundamentals into your automatic responses.

Peace favor your sword,
Kirk
That's a nice advice you gave me there but I didn't get what u meant by swatting? Does it have to do with head movements?
 

lklawson

Grandmaster
Joined
Feb 3, 2005
Messages
5,036
Reaction score
1,680
Location
Huber Heights, OH
That's a nice advice you gave me there but I didn't get what u meant by swatting?
It's an old boxing technique. It, literally, looks like swatting or slapping incoming punches.

Does it have to do with head movements?
Not necessarily. I like the way Jack Dempsey taught it in his book Championship Fighting but, honestly, it's pretty old and shows up in lots of places. Basically, when you set your hands in a fighting guard, set them just a bit wide. This kind of funnels punches to your mid-line. Your opponent will automatically try to punch to your center torso and head BETWEEN your fists. This sounds like it's inviting a punch to the face and, in a way, it kind of is. But it's a trap. You already know the straight line punch is going to be coming between your fists (because you left them deceptively wide). Manage your distance so that your opponent isn't so close that he can launch punches before you can begin to react. As soon as you perceive that a punch is coming (watch the shoulders & hips), slap down with one of your hands (preferably the lead hand, but whatever). This is an old school "inside line hand parry." Immediately after contact with the hand riposte with a backfist to the face using the same hand. That's the Jack Dempsey version.

But the same swatting / "slap-parry" technique (minus the backfist riposte) works with pretty much any high line linear attack (straight punch to pectoral and higher).

Peace favor your sword,
Kirk
 
OP
Moz bruce Lee

Moz bruce Lee

White Belt
Joined
May 30, 2015
Messages
8
Reaction score
0
It's an old boxing technique. It, literally, looks like swatting or slapping incoming punches.

Not necessarily. I like the way Jack Dempsey taught it in his book Championship Fighting but, honestly, it's pretty old and shows up in lots of places. Basically, when you set your hands in a fighting guard, set them just a bit wide. This kind of funnels punches to your mid-line. Your opponent will automatically try to punch to your center torso and head BETWEEN your fists. This sounds like it's inviting a punch to the face and, in a way, it kind of is. But it's a trap. You already know the straight line punch is going to be coming between your fists (because you left them deceptively wide). Manage your distance so that your opponent isn't so close that he can launch punches before you can begin to react. As soon as you perceive that a punch is coming (watch the shoulders & hips), slap down with one of your hands (preferably the lead hand, but whatever). This is an old school "inside line hand parry." Immediately after contact with the hand riposte with a backfist to the face using the same hand. That's the Jack Dempsey version.

But the same swatting / "slap-parry" technique (minus the backfist riposte) works with pretty much any high line linear attack (straight punch to pectoral and higher).

Peace favor your sword,
Kirk
Oh my! I see! Seems like a nice idea and yea my sensei did tell me about this slapping thing! Conincidentally, i was just reading jack dempsey's book last week lol. It's a decent book, for a beginner like me, especially his falling step. To be honest, i didnt quite get it well, iklwason, do u have any tips to his falling punch step? Or any common mistake you would like to point it? I would really really appreciate it.
 

Bill Mattocks

Sr. Grandmaster
MTS Alumni
Joined
Feb 8, 2009
Messages
15,672
Reaction score
4,536
Location
Michigan
Dude it's just a belt promotion fight.. The guy I'll be fighting will be of same style (someone from my school)... Well yeah it's my first time putting my basics in use!

I do not think all of us know what a 'belt fight' is. It is not a term I am familiar with, so I think the question is legitimate. What exactly do you mean by 'belt fight'?

If it is just light sparring, then relax and let your techniques happen. You will screw up, and that's OK. It is all about learning.
 

lklawson

Grandmaster
Joined
Feb 3, 2005
Messages
5,036
Reaction score
1,680
Location
Huber Heights, OH
To be honest, i didnt quite get it well, iklwason, do u have any tips to his falling punch step? Or any common mistake you would like to point it? I would really really appreciate it.
Don't exaggerate the step. It's subtle. Don't pick up your lead for and stomp down. It's about falling your weight into the punch. It's almost exactly the same thing as the classic "one inch punch" and works by the same basic mechanism.

Sometimes used to be called the Trigger Step, ims.

Peace favor your sword,
Kirk
 

WaterGal

Master of Arts
Joined
Jul 16, 2012
Messages
1,795
Reaction score
627
Yeah, I've never heard the term "belt fight" before either. It sounds like you're referring to a sparring match against another beginner student at your school, which you need to do or win in order to advance to the next belt rank. That's something I'm familiar with, and I'm sure many others are as well, just not by that name. But I don't like to assume.

What are the rules, if any, for this fight? Does the instructor want to see you demonstrate certain techniques that you've learned, or just that you generally can handle yourself and not give up in the face of adversity? Have you done any sparring before? If this is your first time sparring, maybe you could get together with another student outside of class time and practice.
 
OP
Moz bruce Lee

Moz bruce Lee

White Belt
Joined
May 30, 2015
Messages
8
Reaction score
0
Don't exaggerate the step. It's subtle. Don't pick up your lead for and stomp down. It's about falling your weight into the punch. It's almost exactly the same thing as the classic "one inch punch" and works by the same basic mechanism.

Sometimes used to be called the Trigger Step, ims.

Peace favor your sword,
Kirk
Poof! Found my mistake! I used to stomp...second question, i dont get it, the weight should be shifted forward, right?(to punch harder) But today i was reading on wing chun chain punching and someone wrote something about shifting weight back to hit harder! I might be detrackin from the topic right now but it has been bothering me since this morning!
 

Phobius

Black Belt
Joined
Jun 12, 2015
Messages
692
Reaction score
218
Poof! Found my mistake! I used to stomp...second question, i dont get it, the weight should be shifted forward, right?(to punch harder) But today i was reading on wing chun chain punching and someone wrote something about shifting weight back to hit harder! I might be detrackin from the topic right now but it has been bothering me since this morning!

Forward or backward does not matter much, just do it your way. Personally I have done both to quite some degree and result is not bad either way. Just know that having weight shifted to back foot is a lot harder to learn and not intended for all situations (some WC police will probably disagree with me on this) or ranges.

With a weight shifted back you have to align your body well to generate power, which will in my view reduce the range of your attack. Advantageous in short range but far from it on long range. Besides the advantage of having front foot lose to quickly react or kick is valuable when close so opponent or yourself has too little time to react. Kicks on longer range usually need some sort of body movement more than kicking leg and hip which no longer benefits from not having weight on front leg.

It is a lot more complicated I believe, I dont know honestly because I am crap at explaining and just know because I am doing it myself and can compare to what I have learnt from other arts.
 

lklawson

Grandmaster
Joined
Feb 3, 2005
Messages
5,036
Reaction score
1,680
Location
Huber Heights, OH
Poof! Found my mistake! I used to stomp...second question, i dont get it, the weight should be shifted forward, right?(to punch harder)
In order to add the inertia of your body mass to the strike.

But today i was reading on wing chun chain punching and someone wrote something about shifting weight back to hit harder! I might be detrackin from the topic right now but it has been bothering me since this morning!
Not sure. It sounds like they might be referring to having a solid and stable ("rooted") body stance to launch punches from which are powered only by the chest and arms.

Not what I would do or recommend, but whatever.

Peace favor your sword,
Kirk
 
OP
Moz bruce Lee

Moz bruce Lee

White Belt
Joined
May 30, 2015
Messages
8
Reaction score
0
Forward or backward does not matter much, just do it your way. Personally I have done both to quite some degree and result is not bad either way. Just know that having weight shifted to back foot is a lot harder to learn and not intended for all situations (some WC police will probably disagree with me on this) or ranges.

With a weight shifted back you have to align your body well to generate power, which will in my view reduce the range of your attack. Advantageous in short range but far from it on long range. Besides the advantage of having front foot lose to quickly react or kick is valuable when close so opponent or yourself has too little time to react. Kicks on longer range usually need some sort of body movement more than kicking leg and hip which no longer benefits from not having weight on front leg.

It is a lot more complicated I believe, I dont know honestly because I am crap at explaining and just know because I am doing it myself and can compare to what I have learnt from other arts.
Lol dude it's ok, i got you! It did sort of clear the misleading thoughts in my head (well some of them). Geez its my first time here in this site and i keep bombarding with these questions.
Ok another one, lets say my opponent has temple and face covered, i cant deliver roundhouse kick (maw shi giri in kyokushin)...i do have a few lot more options of body to kick him, lets say i want to kick him in the leg, which part of leg is sensitive to pain and more ideal to hit on!? And to kick him with what on that particular part? With foot or the shin rod?
P.s. I know its stupid question but HEY! I have a fight tomorrow! :(
 
Top