New to the Tang Soo

fightingpower

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Hi,

I am a 1st Dan Judo practitioner and have trainined previously for many years in Kickboxing. I was once upon a time the coach for the Uni of Kent K Box school. I really enjoyed kicking and think i was okay at it. I have therefore recently at 28, tried to get into a Korean Kickiung orientated style. I liked Tae Kwon Do , but politics and poor instruction in my area meant I coudlnt really seetle with it. I have found a really good Tang Soo Do club and enjoyed my first lesson the other day. The coach had amazing kicks and seemed to like my form. I am wondering if anybody could offer me some advice on whether my previous training will help or hinder. I am still very flexible thanks to continued Judo and can do full splits. Also what are the average grading times as I am keen to get stuck in. Love this art and i hope I can post my proggresion on here as I go.

All and any insights welcome.

Gav
 

Makalakumu

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Depending on the school, Judo will really help as you learn more grappling. You'll see Judo everywhere in the hyung especially at the advanced level.
 

Masshiro

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when starting a new MA you should "empty your glass" take all that knowledge as new and not compare it to anything in which you allready know. normal testing is about every 2 months but it is realy up to your instructer.
 
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fightingpower

fightingpower

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Agreed, but I think that the flexibility and musculature I have gained from previous training will assist to a certain degree.

Thanks for post
 

Yossarian

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Agreed, but I think that the flexibility and musculature I have gained from previous training will assist to a certain degree True but I found my TSD training didnt help much when I took up judo. Even though I was used to tsd training, sparring in Judo totally drained me. Usually gradings are held every three months depending on the org, you will probably have a set amount of forms, one steps and techniques to learn for each belt.
 
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fightingpower

fightingpower

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It's abolutely the case that the conditioning required for grappling and striking are different animals. I think Judo Randori can be a game of attrition in alot of cases where as sparring is more about speed and being technically tactical! Randori still takes it out of me by the way ha!
 

NinjaJax

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The flexibility that you already acquired from your previous training will certainly give you a great head start in TSD. Like what was said before, do not compare what you are going to be learning with what you already know. Do not throw away techniques from your previous training either, even if they do not flow with your new training. Rather combine both styles to make yourself an even better all around martial artist. I think the best thing someone can do to become a great martial artist is to take up different styles and combine the best of them all.

Best of luck in your new training, and Tang Soo!
 

Lynne

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How is it going, fighting power? Do you like your new school and the art so far?

I only took Judo for a short time (years ago), but I've noticed it is very rare to use an opponent's momentum against them in Tang Soo Do. We use our own momentum with twisting and preparation to deliver strikes.

The other day we were doing some takedowns. My old Judo kicked in and I did a foot sweep by hooking my foot around my opponent's ankle, grabbing his shoulder and pulling him down. Some things you never forget! I was supposed to stay "inside" and use my hip to throw my opponent into the air and let him tumble down. Next time I did it right (what my instructor told me to do).

Our grading times are on a set schedule. If a student is absolutely not ready to test, sometimes their name will be removed from the test schedule. Sometimes, they are required to test anyway as a learning experience. Starting at orange belt (8th gup) though green belt levels (6th - 4th gup), we have spotlights which are a quiz of current material. White and yellow belt material takes about 2 months each to complete. Orange belt material takes three months for each gup. Green takes three months for each gup level (a total of 9 months). Red belt material takes 6 months per gup (we have "midterms" every other month).

Our school takes a different approach than many schools. It is not unusual for kids to fail their tests. Adults fail occasionally (if they haven't been to class, they will often miss material). I mention this because people say that the instructor tests students when they are ready. Our school's philosophy is that students should be ready by X date.

Many adults and children fail their IL Gup exam. The IL Gup determines whether one is ready to test for black belt. Ours is a 4-1/2 - 5 hour test without water or breaks. It's very rigorous and the physical endurance part really tests us on a mental level. If I get promoted to IL Gup a few months before the exam, I will have to take it even though I will not be ready. There won't be enough time to learn the new forms, new material. That will be some learning experience. And to think I will have to take it again, and maybe even a third time. The black belt test will be "easy" in comparison.

I'm not sure if other TSD schools have an IL Gup exam or how it's structured.

Hope you are enjoying TSD!
 

CDKJudoka

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One thing I think Judo will help with is the loose and relaxed way that it is performed. I have been a judoka for about 15 years and it has helped me stay loose in TKD which helps my techniques flow better. But that is just me. There is a young judoka at my club who started with TSD and we are having a hard time breaking him of his stiffness that most linear striking artists seem to think is part of being a good striker.
 

clfsean

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There is a young judoka at my club who started with TSD and we are having a hard time breaking him of his stiffness that most linear striking artists seem to think is part of being a good striker.

Sounds like me when I first switched to Aikido & then the Buj in the 90's. Finally figured it out doing taiji. Now... I'm not so stiff.
 

CDKJudoka

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Sounds like me when I first switched to Aikido & then the Buj in the 90's. Finally figured it out doing taiji. Now... I'm not so stiff.

I was the same way when I started. I had been doing TKD for about 5 years when I started judo and it took me getting tossed a lot to loosen up and stop doing cross steps. But you learn eventually and it has been a boon to my TKD training.
 

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