Need advice on joining a Kenpo school

ldgman1970

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Hi all,

I am coming to the completion of an introductory course at this great Kenpo school that is very highly regarded and reputable and I would like to join. The introductory course was very reasonably priced but nobody has really been able to tell me what it actually cost per month. Some people have said it's $800 for the year and/or $500 for six months, which are both pretty reasonable considering the school and the head instructor, but at my last private introductory lesson I was told that you have to pay for the whole year or six months up front. I don't have a problem committing to this school for that long but I really only can afford to pay for a couple of months right now. At any rate I will be talking with the head of the school tonight and I was wondering if should just say I will be back in two months when I can afford 6 months or if I should just say that I really want to join but I can't pay for the entire six months or a year upfront?

Also, is this common for martial arts schools? Most normal fitness clubs allow you to pay per month but you have to sign a contract or they will give you a break if you pay for a year.

Thanks!!
 
M

Mark Weiser

Guest
With new Software and Online Banking services and Credit Cards. I see no need for a student having to pay up for an entire year.

You can sign a Automatic Pay Agreement thur your bank or Credit Card and sign a Contract for a year with an agreed monthly cost. Heck there are companies that do this for a small fee and take care of all the fiscal concerns all the student and Instructor have to do is sign a piece of paper and then fax it in and your done.

No more worries about paying your fees it is done automaticly per month on an agreed date by you the student.

I would be slightly concerned when the studio is more concerned with a big lump sum upfront and does not take in account not everyone can afford ya.

I belong to SIDEKICK FOUNDATION and it is great program for poor and needy people that want to study MA. Also you can give out scholarships based on need or a great PR program by giving lessons for free once in awhile.
 

mj-hi-yah

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At our school we are able to make monthly payments. You should discuss it with the instructor. I think he may prefer to keep you as a student rather than risk losing you, but he may also say that it is a policy he doesn't break and then you can still decide to go back in two months. Basically, it seems you have nothing to lose by at least explaining your situation and hoping for the best.
 

Flatlander

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I am certain that he/she will be more than receptive to your concerns. You don't get to run a successful school without being a people person!
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Ceicei

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Sounds a lot like my school. There is a fixed or base tuition, but the tuition for students sometimes can vary because the head instructor at my school also takes into consideration family situations, number of students from same family, student's schedules, ability to pay, and several other factors. That may be why you can't get the same answer from other students since theirs may differ.

If you explain to your head instructor your situation, I'm sure he will be willing to listen and consider what can be done for you to continue training.

Contracts can be a good thing (tuition usually is cheaper by the year than if paid monthly) if the dojo is reputable, you feel comfortable there, you intend on staying there for a long time, and there are clauses that clearly state conditions that allow the contract to terminate early without hassle. For a new student, a contract generally is not recommended until you feel more established with the school.

Basically, just talk to your head instructor and express your concerns and discuss available options.

- Ceicei
 
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ldgman1970

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Thanks for all of the advice. I will definitely talk with the instructor and see what my options are. I must admit I do find it a little strange that they don't allow some flexibility in payment. But of course maybe I am only getting the stories of what these individual instructors did when they were students.

And it is a little weird that they would force a minimum six month committment because even though I am eager to committ I am sure there are many people that would feel the need to try it out for a few months before they committ long term. And finally since this instructor is considered by many to be among the top Kenpo intructors in the world it's not as if he has a hard time getting and keeping students. My gut tells me he will give me some options and it's not like I am saying I can't pay $80-$100 per month but just that I don't really want to cut a check for $500 right now and I don't want to put it on a credit card. Hopefully it will work out.
 

DavidCC

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6 months is not along, it's a good amount of time to really know if the system is right for you. Asking for 6 months fees up front is a little unusual, but if the instructor's reputation is that good, then I wouldn;t worry too much about it. I mean, unless you don't have it of course :)
 
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