Modern Arnis Blocks

Rich Parsons

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1 through 12 Striking see :
Striking 1 - 12


Next Topic I would like to discuss is Blocks.



Inward Block
Inward Block with a Brace

Outward Block
Outward Block with a Brace

Umbrella Block
Slanting Block

Horizontal Block
Horizontal Block with a Brace

Vertical Block

Downward Inward
Downward Outward

From the Twirling:
Rolling Block to the Right
Rolling Block to the Left
Rolling Block upwards


The Above term(s) are what I learned when I started Modern Arnis.

Inward is to the same side that you are holding the cane in your hand. i.e. If the cane is in your right hand then inward is to your right and outward is to your left. If you have the cane is in your left hand then inward is to the left and outward is to the right.

Later I heard the terms:

Block to the Right
Block to the Left

Down to the Right
Down to the Left

It did not matter which hand, only that it was being blocked to a certain side.



You Assignment if you choose to accept it is:

1) Give a description of what you think the Blocks are.

2) Discuss the terms I used here and also other terms you yourself may have heard or used.


Thank You!
:asian:

(* Updated Link to be hidden *)
 
Rich,
I don't use "inward" or "outward" block. I use "force to force" or what I got from Manong Ted Buot, "small c." I just use the term "brace block," again no inward or outward. There is also the sweep stroke as well as passing and Palis Palis.

Yours,
Dan Anderson
 
Yes, Dan, I heard Force to Force also in descirption of both the Inward/Outward and the To the Right and To the Left.


:)
 
Descriptions:
(* Assumes Cane is in the Right Hand *)

Inward Block - A Force to Force block against the opponents strike. This is for the right hand side of the body. Defends against strikes 2 & 4

Inward Block with a Brace - A Force to Force block against the opponents strike. The left hand flows out from the body to the cane, to brace for the impact. This is for the right hand side of the body. Defends against strikes 2 & 4

Outward Block - A Force to Force block against the opponents strike. This is for the left hand side of the body. Defends against strikes 1 & 3

Outward Block with a Brace - A Force to Force block against the opponents strike. The left hand flows out from the body to the cane, to brace for the impact. This is for the left hand side of the body. Defends against strikes 1 & 3

Umbrella Block - (* Called Roof Block in some systems *) The Cane comes up and crosses the strike as teh left hand parries the strike away. This is traditionally done against a number 12 strike. You can also apply this block on the left side of your body against the incoming Strike # 1 & 3 as well as the # 12

Slanting Block - (* Some times called Wing Block *) This block covers the right hand side of the body. The cane comes up Punyo (* butt of the cane *) first, as the left hand parried the strike down the cane. Defends against strikes 2 & 4 and non traditionally #12. (* The Number 12 looks like a Horizontal Block *)

Horizontal Block - The cane rises up horizontal to the ground in a striking manner or in a force to force manner up above the head of the defender. This defends against the number 12 strike.

Horizontal Block with a Brace - The cane rises up and the left hand rises also to brace the cane above your head. This block is fr the number 12 strike.

Vertical Block - The cane is swept from the right to the left across the body wiht the cane in a vertical position. This is to defend against the number 5 strike.

Downward Inward - This is a force to force block with the cane dropping down to the right side of the body. This defends aginst the number 8 strike.

Downward Outward - This is a force to force block with the cane dropping down to the leftt side across the body. This defends aginst the number 9 strike.

Rolling Blocks later, for I am going to go get some sleep :D

:asian:


(* Please Note: Footwork will be discussed later, after the hand placement has been discussed. :) *)
 
I was taught the wing block and practiced it but never really use it.

A wing block on a #2 strike - Zone out to your left, right hand is palm up with stick hanging down and held between thumb and index fingers, and left hand palm down bracing bottom of stick.

This position is easy to get into if you're standing at the ready with one hand at each end of the stick but not from other positions. After you block it does kinda spring load your stick for an abanico. Also if the stick is not braced at the bottom the block is useless. I really haven't found much use for it but maybe others have.

SAL
 
Originally posted by Cebu West
I was taught the wing block and practiced it but never really use it.

A wing block on a #2 strike - Zone out to your left, right hand is palm up with stick hanging down and held between thumb and index fingers, and left hand palm down bracing bottom of stick.

This position is easy to get into if you're standing at the ready with one hand at each end of the stick but not from other positions. After you block it does kinda spring load your stick for an abanico. Also if the stick is not braced at the bottom the block is useless. I really haven't found much use for it but maybe others have.

SAL


Interesting Sal,

What you described is what I call a Rolling Block :D

Thanks for the input.
 
Under what circumstances do you use the rolling block?

The only time I use something close to it is on a right to left slant block where the grip of the right hand is the same.

SAL
 
Originally posted by Cebu West
Under what circumstances do you use the rolling block?

The only time I use something close to it is on a right to left slant block where the grip of the right hand is the same.

SAL

I personally do not use the rolling block. I have seen it used by Master Jeff Owens quite well and with good timing. This block is used when you have both hands on your cane and you cet a quick reply from your opponent.

I have used the slanting block where the right hand is palm up and the left hand travels down the outside of the cane. The best example is the out of the ten count drill. After the number 5 thrust the opponent does their vertical block and strikes back with a number 4. You then do the Slanting Block and strike the number 12.

Are we talking about the same thing? with a different name? or are we talking about differnt techniques? It would nto be the first time I made that mistake :D

:asian:
 
Just an update on my discussion with Rich on my wing block and his rolling block. We got together at the WMAA Camp this past weekend and discovered that they are one and the same just with different names. In the FMA it really is a small world. Face to face discussion does do wonders. Rich and I briefly worked on a drill that I have been using lately and he picked up on some variations that can be applied to the drill from the Balintawak point of view. Rich will be an instructor at the upcoming WMAA October Camp in Delaware and I am looking foreword to exploring this in greater depth with him. The forum discussions are great but stick to stick is really where it's at.
 
Originally posted by Cebu West
. . . but stick to stick is really where it's at.


Sal,

I agree with you, Stick to Stick is great, yet the discussion can lead to understanding or to questions and what to ask when you meet face to face. :)


:asian:
 
Bringing to the top for discussion
:asian:
 
One of the things that occurred to me while running this drill I've been using by Rich, is that when working a drill with someone you train with regularly, you stay in the pattern and the drill goes nicely at any speed due to it's familiarity to both participants. In the brief time I had to work with Rich on this, he changed the pattern out of instinct right from the get go. This alone tells me that I need to explore this drill in greater detail, and expand it to accommodate different approaches.
For a drill to be a useful training tool it must be flexible and adaptable to curves thrown by someone not familiar with it. If it is adaptable to change yet still capable of retaining it's core, then it's worth keeping. I am eager to work on this with Rich as well as others at the WMAA camp in Delaware this October.
I guess I'll make this one of my research and development projects.

SAL
 
Originally posted by Cebu West
One of the things that occurred to me while running this drill I've been using by Rich, is that when working a drill with someone you train with regularly, you stay in the pattern and the drill goes nicely at any speed due to it's familiarity to both participants. In the brief time I had to work with Rich on this, he changed the pattern out of instinct right from the get go. This alone tells me that I need to explore this drill in greater detail, and expand it to accommodate different approaches.
For a drill to be a useful training tool it must be flexible and adaptable to curves thrown by someone not familiar with it. If it is adaptable to change yet still capable of retaining it's core, then it's worth keeping. I am eager to work on this with Rich as well as others at the WMAA camp in Delaware this October.
I guess I'll make this one of my research and development projects.

SAL

Sal,

Yes, drill are good to help define timing ad technique. Once the basics of both are down then it is nice to try to break the pattern and then when you are lost, go back to the pattern. This allows you to flow into free play.

I know we will have fun at yours and Chad's Camp :D.

Enjoy
:asian:
 
It is now Later

After further review I think, I made a mistake with Sal's Wing and Rolling Block. I have previously heard the Wing used with the slanting


Rolling Block to the Right
This block starts with both hands on the cane at opposite ends.

Take the right hand and bring it palm up towards your center, as you step out with the left leg into the 45 stance. This block is not meant to with stand the force in a force to force. It is a Transitional Block. The advantage is that it allows you to come out of the block with the cane in either hand. So, if you are looking to switch hands and surprise the opponent this is a good way.

Rolling Block to the Left
This is the same as the rolling block to the right except you step to the right, and the left hand is on top.


Rolling Block to the Up
Instead of covering a side of the body this covers the head, the hand that comes to the center continues up and over the head with the other hand following. With the foot work and steeping this places the stick at a deflection angle away from you.


:asian:
 
Which Blocks do people teach first?
 
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