mental prep.

mj_lover

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evening ladies and gents. i was thinking today about fighting, not tech wise, but mentally wise. how do you train to be mentally tough? to win a fight, sparring or real, you have to not worry/care if you hurt the other person. I have found if you worry, you hold back, fight to defencive, and go in to slow. thus loosing. now, this also pretains to verbal debates, arguments, etc. so i was wondering, what do you people do to adrees this issue? and comments?

Mj_lover
 

Sapper6

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you train hard, having confidence in what you are doing, never doubting your reasons for doing it. don't quit when training is tough.

when the fight comes, fight like you're about to lose, because at any moment, you could :asian:
 

MJS

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mj_lover said:
evening ladies and gents. i was thinking today about fighting, not tech wise, but mentally wise. how do you train to be mentally tough? to win a fight, sparring or real, you have to not worry/care if you hurt the other person. I have found if you worry, you hold back, fight to defencive, and go in to slow. thus loosing. now, this also pretains to verbal debates, arguments, etc. so i was wondering, what do you people do to adrees this issue? and comments?

Mj_lover

If everytime you spar/train in the dojo, you injure the other person, your training partners are going to slowly disappear due to injury. Grouping a sparring session vs. a real fight are two different things, therefore, fall into 2 different categories.

Maybe you can clarify your statement.

Mike
 
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mj_lover

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your right, i did a terible job wording that. I'm trying to train myself to be more agressive. To score points in sparring (not hurt the other person), would be a nice bonus, but the "kill or be killed" mentality needed to survive a real fight is actually the prime concern. I hope this makes more sense.
 

MJS

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mj_lover said:
your right, i did a terible job wording that. I'm trying to train myself to be more agressive. To score points in sparring (not hurt the other person), would be a nice bonus, but the "kill or be killed" mentality needed to survive a real fight is actually the prime concern. I hope this makes more sense.

Yes, thank you for the clarification! I'll address each part here.

Regarding the ring fighting: Getting in the ring and sparring, and sparring and sparring is one way to get good. Like anything, the more you practice, the better you'll get. Start off slow, making sure that you have good tech. and then gradually build up.

As for the street: Keep your training as realistic as possible. Obviously, you'll never be able to repicate a street fight exactly, but with some aliveness and realism, your training will greatly improve.

I hope this was a help. Any more questions, feel free to ask.

Mike
 
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mj_lover

mj_lover

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alright, i shall see if some of the other guys are willing to go at me a little more realistic. don't know if i will be more agessive after, but its worth a shot.
thank both of you :asian:
 
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clapping_tiger

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I would suggest to be more aggressive in sparring, get used to getting hit. Once you are used to getting hit, it is easier to get in there and mix it up.

For the street, to keep it real, you may want to incorporate "woofing" into your training. Woofing is basically getting yelled at, like what would happen on the street. It seems goofy at first, but it does get you used to the getting yelled at. You have someone yell at you as what they would on the street. Come up with a situation, like you just spilled someones drink. your partner yells at you calling you every name in the book, and have them at random say things like "I'll Slice you up" or things like that. You will get used to tuning out the useless crap, and pick up the Slice you up stuff. That keys you in that they have a blade or sharp object of some sort. Same can be done for guns or whatever. Also make sure they are moving, and have them at random, act like they are going for a knife/gun behind their back, but they try to do it so you don't notice.

The first couple of times we did this (all adults by the way) I was amazed at how often I focused on the bad things they would say about me, and not on what was important. This will also help you to keep calm in that type of situation and get good at talking your way out of it. I don't know if this all came out in a way that was easy to understand if you haven't seen this done but you get the idea. We do this drill often with Police officers in the class and get to act as the bad guy, resist arrest, and help them practice keeping calm and watch for what is important while interviewing an agitated suspect.
 
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mj_lover

mj_lover

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wow, thats a good one, hadn't thought of that, i'm gonna run that by my instructor. thanks!
 
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clapping_tiger

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Your welcome. If you can find a good "woofer", and it is harder than it sounds because you have to be able to be real mean to people you like. But you will be surprised at how much adrenaline you will pump, even by a controlled situation. To really make this work, and this is the hard part, you have to let them attack your sore spots or even attack your race or religion, even in a controlled environment, and having been told this stuff would be said, the people involved still found that it brought out the same feelings as if it would have happened out on the street. This goes farther than most people are willing to go, but that is why you have to do this will willing adults. What do I mean by this? Here are some "clean" examples of what was said in our classes.

The overweight were called Fat a**es
A black guy was called, well you can imagine
The women were called sluts, w**res, and the big "C" word.
a guy wearing the Star of David was teased
and you were called an Ugly F'er, you were called gay, a P***Y and any other degrading thing in the book.

The lesson was that all these things hurt and can provoke you into a fight, but they really do nothing to hurt you, or give you a reason to defend yourself. However if someone says. "C'mon you fat F'er, I'm gonna kick your a** and cut your heart out." Now you have reason to believe he may have a knife and intend to use it on you. Also this teaches you to tune out the degrading useless talk and focus on what they are doing.
 
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mj_lover

mj_lover

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yup, i mentioned this to my instructor, but he seems a littl eunsure, as we often have kids running around/spectating but i'm gonna see what i can do
thanks again
mj
 

Adept

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clapping_tiger said:
The overweight were called Fat a**es
A black guy was called, well you can imagine
The women were called sluts, w**res, and the big "C" word.
a guy wearing the Star of David was teased
and you were called an Ugly F'er, you were called gay, a P***Y and any other degrading thing in the book.
:D

Obviously not an Australian then. These are all considered warm greetings between friends in Australia!
 

An Eternal Student

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Generaly I just try to flow with it.You have different goals depending on the situation, maybe scoring points in the ring, trying to save a friend, making sure the opponent goes down and stays down or even just staying alive. I relax, focus on my goal and allow my training to guide me to that result.It seems to work pretty well.
 

hammer

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Adept said:
:D

Obviously not an Australian then. These are all considered warm greetings
between friends in Australia!
Adept , it is so true,
 

An Eternal Student

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So Australians are like that as well?Here in Ireland the general greeting goes along the lines of "you c*nt/w*nker/b*stard/f*uckface or b*tch.We really are pretty foul-mouthed.
 
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TonyM.

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ROTHLMAO at Adept!
Woof tickets are also good to pursuade your opponent that you mean business.
 

hammer

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Originally Posted by mj_lover
your right, i did a terible job wording that. I'm trying to train myself to be more agressive. To score points in sparring (not hurt the other person), would be a nice bonus, but the "kill or be killed" mentality needed to survive a real fight is actually the prime concern. I hope this makes more sense.


mj lover , I can only offer my opioin based on my own , it is said that its not the size of the dog,but the fight in the dog , AGRESSION I is an attitude, at state of mind,

1. Having or showing determination and energetic pursuit of your ends, 2,Marked by aggressive ambition and energy and initiative.
3,Characteristic of an enemy or one eager to fight.
4,A complex mental state involving beliefs and feelings and values and dispositions to act in certain ways.


there a a number of drills that will assist you in your endeavours,but this is trainning that you should have the guidence of an experince instructor as to keep things in check,lol


although as you develop with your trainning your attitude will change,your confidence will grow your skill will improve,and perhaps this may become less important, but perhaps in the mean time you may consider reading books that focus on mind set, warrior with in, ect,


The last peice of advice i can offer is dont try and experince something that your not ready for . when you are ready you will know ,lol


i hope this helps cheers
 
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clapping_tiger

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I too have been known to throw out some friendly foul language among my buddies :2xBird2: , And heck, here in the states the "N" word is used in just about every other line hip-hop and rap songs. But in the wrong context, and depending on who says it to you can turn that friendly greeting into fighting words. :boxing: Kind of funny how that works.
 

still learning

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Hello, To fight without fear? Mum...? May I suggest reading the book - The "Gift of Fear " by Gavin De Becker and " Real Fighting "by Peytion Quinn. You may find the answers to your question. Fighting the fear inside of us is normal for most of us. These books have help me alot..........good luck....Aloha
 
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mj_lover

mj_lover

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thanks, i'll look into it. although fear isn't my main problem, its the whole brain shutting down and not function thing that i'm dealing with, although, i have a felling they are related, maybe i am afraid to hurt. I'm gonna hit the libary tomorrow.
 

Corporal Hicks

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Though I wouldnt say that using aggression against a person even if they are aggressive against you is always the best plan in a competition. Maybe in a real fight as long as you dont lose your cool and let your emotions control you which granted is quite hard.
An aggressive person in sparring can be generally somebody who is panicking that they are going to lose so they are going to use the first thing that comes to their heads which they think will help them. I've seen it before in tournaments and I've had it done to me, not only that you can also tell somebody's attitude from their aggressiveness. I find alot of cocky people are those in TKD who think that just because they are good at sparring they are automaticly good at fighting.
As much as I want to I will not turn to them and say take off your pads and your gloves and now fight me, and we'll see how well you do! The point is (phew) that the mental block maybe caused by you either not wanting to hurt the other person or that you fear getting hurt. I would agree with getting those particular books!
Get stuck in I'd say, tally ho!

Regards
 
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