LARPING?

Tez3

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over here tilting is jousting.

Definition of TILT

noun:
a : a contest on horseback in which two combatants charging with lances or similar weapons try to unhorse each other :
b : a tournament of tilts


tilting at rings was a later use of the term.
prior use was synonymous with jousting.
first used in 1594.

Tilting at rings, and the Carasel games were brought about as jousting fell from favor.


Ah Americans .. Tilting was a training exercise for fighting and jousting, it wasn't brought in 'later' though perhaps in the US at your Renaissance fairs? 'Tilting' at rings and the quintain were ways to practice. Most castles had a tilt yard where the men would practice, the three castles close to me did, all Norman. The Royal Armouries have a huge amount of information on fighting and training as well as genuine armour and arms from the 11th century through to the 17th. They also have a tilt yard.

The ‘tilt’ is the barrier between the two opposing jousters – this could be a solid fence, length of fabric or wooden rail. The ‘counter tilt’ was usually shorter than the tilt and was a barrier which defines the boundary of the lane down which jousters could canter. Again, this did not necessarily need to be a solid structure and could just have been some rope with fabric over the top.

Jousts replaced melees which proved to be costly as deaths would often occur so jousting considered somewhat safer was introduced. Infor from Royal Armouries and Middleham Castle historian (and a bit from the Household Calvary riding instructor who lives just down the road and wears armour on horseback for real but who is also an authority on fighting from horseback through the ages)

joust | Definition of joust in English by Oxford Dictionaries
 

JowGaWolf

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They are using legit sword fighting techniques as shown by the video on page #1
What I got from that video is that they learned legit sword fighting techniques first and they are using LARPING to practice those techniques. This would fall in line with my statement of learning the real thing first. I like that they showed the video of Trained vs Untrained because it really highlights the GAPS between the LARPING and Actual Sword techniques. If they were using heavier weapons then it would be even easier to see just how much difference there is.

In all honesty, I want to go LARPING with a staff. Stuff like this would make drool. I watch the whole video and thought. "Yeah buddy, I'm going to take out a lot of you guys." lol.

They would hate me. lol Look how he uses it ha ha ha.. Yep I'll definitely have FUN. Fun kicking their a$ with a pvc pipe staff. ha ha ha. But the way he explains it shows he's totally clueless about a real spear.

By the way I'm not putting him down. I just see it differently. I did a lot of pretending as a kid and eventually I just wanted to do the real thing, even if it's with a foam weapon, or wooden stick. If I spent as much time as these guy do for LARPING then I might as well train the real thing and learn an actual fighting skill.
 

JowGaWolf

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Much of TMA is similar to Larping, IMO. Take Kung-Fu....it's mostly non-Asians dressed up like Asians of non-modern times, doing ancient flowery forms with their limbs, weapons, etc. like right out of a Run Run Shaw KF movie.
ouch lol.
 

TSDTexan

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Ah Americans .. Tilting was a training exercise for fighting and jousting, it wasn't brought in 'later' though perhaps in the US at your Renaissance fairs? 'Tilting' at rings and the quintain were ways to practice. Most castles had a tilt yard where the men would practice, the three castles close to me did, all Norman. The Royal Armouries have a huge amount of information on fighting and training as well as genuine armour and arms from the 11th century through to the 17th. They also have a tilt yard.

The ‘tilt’ is the barrier between the two opposing jousters – this could be a solid fence, length of fabric or wooden rail. The ‘counter tilt’ was usually shorter than the tilt and was a barrier which defines the boundary of the lane down which jousters could canter. Again, this did not necessarily need to be a solid structure and could just have been some rope with fabric over the top.

Jousts replaced melees which proved to be costly as deaths would often occur so jousting considered somewhat safer was introduced. Infor from Royal Armouries and Middleham Castle historian (and a bit from the Household Calvary riding instructor who lives just down the road and wears armour on horseback for real but who is also an authority on fighting from horseback through the ages)

joust | Definition of joust in English by Oxford Dictionaries
no..

the dictionary clearly defined tilting as a noun in which two competitors, or adversaries charged each other with the spear or the lance.

The practice of calling tentpegging, or jousting at rings specifically "tilting" and redefining tilting to not mean jousting is rather late. and inaccurate to say the least.

[I have the high ground Anakin]

by the by...
I am well aware that the barrier that created the lanes is called the tilt, by many.

And no... I didn't start tilting or jousting in renfairs.
Renfairs jousting is oftentimes choreographed, and predetermined. (fake, but they can pay 5 thousand usd for a weekend of work.)

I was a jousting partner for several competitive jousters. [Think sparing partner.]

There are more than 15 professional jousting tournaments in the USA. These are formal jousts that take place annually. Some Cheques payout 38 thousand dollars usd (Scotish Highland Games) for the top man, or woman.

If you scroll through the names on the list here, realize I have either met, served, or trained with greater then 80% of the folks here.

Find a Jouster
 
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TSDTexan

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What I got from that video is that they learned legit sword fighting techniques first and they are using LARPING to practice those techniques. This would fall in line with my statement of learning the real thing first. I like that they showed the video of Trained vs Untrained because it really highlights the GAPS between the LARPING and Actual Sword techniques. If they were using heavier weapons then it would be even easier to see just how much difference there is.

In all honesty, I want to go LARPING with a staff. Stuff like this would make drool. I watch the whole video and thought. "Yeah buddy, I'm going to take out a lot of you guys." lol.

They would hate me. lol Look how he uses it ha ha ha.. Yep I'll definitely have FUN. Fun kicking their a$ with a pvc pipe staff. ha ha ha. But the way he explains it shows he's totally clueless about a real spear.

By the way I'm not putting him down. I just see it differently. I did a lot of pretending as a kid and eventually I just wanted to do the real thing, even if it's with a foam weapon, or wooden stick. If I spent as much time as these guy do for LARPING then I might as well train the real thing and learn an actual fighting skill.

But that would require "work".
 

Tony Dismukes

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you trying to torture people. Japanese TV is just that , and don't get the smart idea of posting that show on their TV that had people dragged along tarmac on their bare butts just for a laugh,

The Japanese taste in TV is a bit like the German ..........................................(crap)
I believe that clip is actually from a Korean show. It’s a pretty cool segment.
 
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FriedRice

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ouch lol.

Oh c'mon, I didn't mean it in a bad way though....just jokingly......because I know ya'll are super immersed in the Asian culture, and in a respecting manner; to the point where some Black dudes starts talking like Bruce Lee almost when they speak in English. Even the demeanor is Bruce Lee-ish. Nothing wrong with this, just like when Asians acting like they're born & bred in Compton b/c they're heavily into the rap culture....and you know that you have to chuckle a bit at that, as a Black man.
 
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FriedRice

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What I got from that video is that they learned legit sword fighting techniques first and they are using LARPING to practice those techniques. This would fall in line with my statement of learning the real thing first. I like that they showed the video of Trained vs Untrained because it really highlights the GAPS between the LARPING and Actual Sword techniques. If they were using heavier weapons then it would be even easier to see just how much difference there is.

The techniques are still real though, and I looked it up....Medieval swords are around 40oz. The Larper's 2-handed Great Swords are 40oz and up. Even with lighter Larping swords, and once they switch to real ones.....it's still swinging a blade. They just can't do rapid chopping in the air like it's nothing, with a real sword, but they still have the techniques and experience. All that dodging, block, parrying, etc. can still kill someone.

In all honesty, I want to go LARPING with a staff. Stuff like this would make drool. I watch the whole video and thought. "Yeah buddy, I'm going to take out a lot of you guys." lol.

You'll love it. Your skills will certainly transfer over. The Larping staff is about 40oz, which is heavier and bulkier than a real staff. They're like those used in soldiers' boot camps, often seen in movies.


They would hate me. lol Look how he uses it ha ha ha.. Yep I'll definitely have FUN. Fun kicking their a$ with a pvc pipe staff. ha ha ha. But the way he explains it shows he's totally clueless about a real spear.

When you're in Maryland, you should come out. I'll let you use my 6' glaive (****, I can't believe I just spent $200 on all this ****) I want to see how someone trained in MA would do vs. them. I'm don't have much training with these weapons (ie. staff), but wait....there are Kendo instructors and all that in their group, as I recall them talking about it. And I think a few train Karate, so there's probably staff training in there. They have weekly practice where you don't have to dress up like Braveheart and ****, but when all the armies meet up for battle, then you can wear your Kung-Fu uniform (else you can't play). There's a major battle on the day after Thanksgiving and it was like 200+ geeks all decked out. It really was kind of like Braveheart where you line up, yell **** and charge. My adrenaline was going nuts.

By the way I'm not putting him down. I just see it differently. I did a lot of pretending as a kid and eventually I just wanted to do the real thing, even if it's with a foam weapon, or wooden stick. If I spent as much time as these guy do for LARPING then I might as well train the real thing and learn an actual fighting skill.

Well it does look stupid as hell if you just watch it, especially from a serious Martial Artist's standpoint....but once you play, it really is fun. Most of them are geeks and very overweight, so they're not looking to get hurt.
 

Langenschwert

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Hmm, I thought HEMA was something else then. $1200 is reasonable. I thought it was like $5000 for cheap/used stuff....so like $10k to start for equipment on average. This is def. something that I'd like to graduate to.

What is this video classified as? And how do you maintain the armor? You have to fix the dents right? Loss of rigidity? Need to pay someone w/qualified skills to maintain it, right?


Looks like SCA kind of stuff to me. Not HEMA in any sense. Note that there are no sources on how to use kite or heater shield, so that is by necessity made up.

This is HEMA: Note the images of the source material (the manual of Fiore dei Liberi). The protective gear is typical of most HEMA, the vast majority of which focuses on unarmoured fencing techniques. The gear is worn in order to spar safely.


I don't know jack about real armour and its maintenance. HEMA focusing on fighting in full harness is much harder to find. Here's a nice exhibition match I saw a few years ago, showing armored sword and spear. Most of the techniques shown are banned in HMB combat because they exploit the weaknesses in the armour and people would get people blinded or worse.


I hope that helps!
 

Tez3

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There are more than 15 professional jousting tournaments in the USA. These are formal jousts that take place annually. Some Cheques payout 38 thousand dollars usd (Scotish Highland Games) for the top man, or woman.


'Scotish (sic) highland games? really, jousting? Just no, that's cultural appropriation at it's worst. Just as is 'jousting' in the USA, you've turned it into a modern sport, well, bully for you but the history is here in Europe. You can't go and see where men at arms actually jousted or trained, we can. You can't see real armour used by the real people of the time ( unless you import it) so all you've done is to make a re-enactment society to entertain people and make money. History is less important than money of course. I will take the word of professional historians who specialise in the subject thank you rather than professional entertainers.
 

now disabled

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'Scotish (sic) highland games? really, jousting? Just no, that's cultural appropriation at it's worst. Just as is 'jousting' in the USA, you've turned it into a modern sport, well, bully for you but the history is here in Europe. You can't go and see where men at arms actually jousted or trained, we can. You can't see real armour used by the real people of the time ( unless you import it) so all you've done is to make a re-enactment society to entertain people and make money. History is less important than money of course. I will take the word of professional historians who specialise in the subject thank you rather than professional entertainers.

Don't get to bent outta shape

I have seen in this country people get history wrong and it our own history

Oh I do know what you are saying btw but I don't think anyone actually takes those re-enactments seriously it is a bit of fun (ok over here we may look on it a bit more skeptically when they are staged but then that is over here)
 

TSDTexan

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'Scotish (sic) highland games? really, jousting? Just no, that's cultural appropriation at it's worst. Just as is 'jousting' in the USA, you've turned it into a modern sport, well, bully for you but the history is here in Europe. You can't go and see where men at arms actually jousted or trained, we can. You can't see real armour used by the real people of the time ( unless you import it) so all you've done is to make a re-enactment society to entertain people and make money. History is less important than money of course. I will take the word of professional historians who specialise in the subject thank you rather than professional entertainers.

Well, I guess you are going back on to my ignore list. Fyi, the IJA was created by a bloody Englishman in England!

And.... as for myself I have a great deal of Scots blood on both sides of my family. And there are a great many Americans who do like wise.

We care about our heritage.

So take your sjw cultural appropriation buzzword nonsense and toss it in the dust bin. I don't have time for your shenanigans.


Good day Maddam Irene.
 
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FriedRice

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I don't know jack about real armour and its maintenance. HEMA focusing on fighting in full harness is much harder to find. Here's a nice exhibition match I saw a few years ago, showing armored sword and spear. Most of the techniques shown are banned in HMB combat because they exploit the weaknesses in the armour and people would get people blinded or worse.


I hope that helps!

Damn, that's hardcore. There's a chick in there and she beat him, twice.
 

Langenschwert

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Damn, that's hardcore. There's a chick in there and she beat him, twice.

Jess Finley is a well established fighter and author. I've met her, but never fought her. She is, by all accounts, a beast. She literally wrote the book on medieval wrestling. Sean Hayes is likewise accomplished in HEMA and classical fencing. Neither one are to be taken lightly. :)
 

Flying Crane

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Much of TMA is similar to Larping, IMO. Take Kung-Fu....it's mostly non-Asians dressed up like Asians of non-modern times, doing ancient flowery forms with their limbs, weapons, etc. like right out of a Run Run Shaw KF movie.
Hmmm. That’s not been my experience. Is the sky blue in your world too?
 

pdg

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the dictionary clearly defined tilting as a noun in which two competitors, or adversaries charged each other with the spear or the lance.

Ah, but which dictionary, and in which language?

The link you provided before was to Merriam Webster, which might well present itself as a dictionary of English, but it's American.

As I'm sure we're all very much aware, English and American are two utterly separate languages ;) Consider that driving on the pavement is a criminal offence here, because the pavement is where people walk.

In English, tilt as a verb (in this context) describes the action during jousting. Leading to sayings like "go at full tilt". So while yes, you tilt during jousting, it's not the game.

Tilt as a noun describes practice for jousting, which may or may not include actual practice jousts.

In Anglish? You've provided a link...
 

TSDTexan

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Ah, but which dictionary, and in which language?

The link you provided before was to Merriam Webster, which might well present itself as a dictionary of English, but it's American.

As I'm sure we're all very much aware, English and American are two utterly separate languages ;) Consider that driving on the pavement is a criminal offence here, because the pavement is where people walk.

In English, tilt as a verb (in this context) describes the action during jousting. Leading to sayings like "go at full tilt". So while yes, you tilt during jousting, it's not the game.

Tilt as a noun describes practice for jousting, which may or may not include actual practice jousts.

In Anglish? You've provided a link...

Well.. it's like how Lieutenant is mispronounced, with the F. I could understand if there were a gh in the first syllable. Lef-tenn-ant.

Of course you need the Americans to fix your anglish, you boys been mucking about with it for centuries and couldn't get it right.

Perhaps, If you guys had kept out the Danes, Norman's, and Saxons out it would have been easier.

So we wouldn't have the Germanic, French, and Latin to deal with (84% more compled right there) layered on top of the base Brythonic Celt, Picts and Welsh, and Nautical Trade Greek that was going on.

Screenshot_20180725-150441_Chrome.jpg


If there is such a thing as proper English... it's the superior American Standard English.


Whenever someone wants to give me the spiel about "Proper English" see below...
J_70fbdb_1667409.gif


All in good fun of course.

Naturally, you guys have to walk on the pavement... not enough room for proper roads, and proper cars.

If only the English had properly conquered Europe... it would have been able to have such wonderful things.
 
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