La Verdadera Destreza

Samurai

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Anyone ever hear of this style of Spanish Rapier fencing? It is based on the so called "Magic Circle". It was featured in the 1995 movie The Mask of Zorro

circle.gif


Any information would help as I would like to look into this style of combat.
Thanks
Jeremy Bays
 
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Samurai

Samurai

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I never "saw" the Universal Pattern from Kenpo fame in that diagram. I guess I was looking but wearing blinders. I wonder how Kenpo -ish techniques could be used with Spanish Fencing??? <<Just thinking out loud>>

PS- Thanks for moving my post. I guess I posted in the wrong topic. Thanks again.
jeremy bays
 

arnisador

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Certification is granted on three levels: Moniteur, Prevost dArmes, and Fencing Master. The initial level, moniteur, is designed primarily for those wishing to teach or coach fencing who wish to gain experience and knowledge in teaching, such as physical education teachers or amateur coaches who might specialize in one weapon. This rating can be acheived by passing a written and practical examination under the supervision of two USFCA fencing masters or prevosts.

The Prevost dArmes level is the second step toward the fencing master degree. Prevost candidates must pass a thorough test comprised of oral, written, and practical parts covering all three weapons. The practical examination is given by a board of three USFCA fencing masters. The highest level of accreditation, fencing master, requires an exhaustive practical and oral examination, given by a board of USFCA fencing masters, as well as a written thesis.

They have ranks like other arts, then!
 
W

westernwarrior

Guest
Originally posted by arnisador
They have ranks like other arts, then!
The ranks for older Western MA's come from the fact that fencing schools were run under the guild system. There were similar to thef "apprentice", "journeyman", and of course "master" ranks of other guilds. There was master of fencing like a master of carpentry. "Provost" is usually a level where you are allowed to teach, but don't fully understand everything, sort of an intermediate between journeyman and master.
 

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