Karate Connections

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Kirk

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I got the freebie, and the orange belt tape. I like them. The
orange belt tape explains a LOT of the basics, very well.

As far as the effectiveness of the system, I don't know enough
about American Kenpo, to even say something about one I don't
train in.

I'd like to eventually one day become an instructor ... possibly
run my own school. They have incredible teaching aids for
teaching kids. I'd like to earn my b.b. in this system, and use it
as my kid's curriculum. I've been reading a LOT from instructors
who say kids pay the bills. My instructor is one of those. He
teaches kids classes and cardio kickboxing ( a LOT ), and says if
he tried to make money teaching adult classes only, he'd be in
the poor house. He's also a b.b. in TKD, which is what he teaches
the kids. TKD with kenpo forms and sets.
 

Big Pat

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I started in Mr. Parker's Chinese Kenpo. The IKCA Kenpo tapes are what I remember Kenpo to be. Very strong, powerful and based on foundation of solid basics. Mr. Sullivan and LeRoux have put togather a system that works very well for me. I prefer to train under someone who can say I have rather than I can.

EKP RIP

Big Pat:asian:
 

thesensei

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Well, I just took the plunge and bought the videos. I have not received them yet, but I think I will be pleased. I began training in Chinese Kenpo 6 years ago under an instructor 3 generations from Mr. Parker. I earned brown belt, and then moved away to go to college. While in college, I earned my black belt in American Karate, and am currently working towards black in TKD. I enjoy my friends in the TKD dojang, and have learned a few things, but I am hungry for more kenpo! So, since there are no available instructors near me, I have decided to try this route. I watched the preview video, and was impressed. So...I'll let you know how it goes in the next few months!

JB
 
K

Kirk

Guest
A big problem I found is that when the IKCA guys go from a
neutral bow to a forward bow, they move both feet. In my
current school, we move just the back foot. I'm told it protects
the groin, but in addition, it would take away a leg check.
 
W

WilliamTLear

Guest
Moving the front foot when transitioning into a forward bow also destroys the stability of your stance.

Sincerely,
Billy Lear, UKS
 

jazkiljok

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Originally posted by Kirk
A big problem I found is that when the IKCA guys go from a
neutral bow to a forward bow, they move both feet. In my
current school, we move just the back foot. I'm told it protects
the groin, but in addition, it would take away a leg check.

when you say they move both feet- do you mean something akin to doing a Chubby Checker dance move? also did you see this on the vids or were you taught this yourself by the IKCA?

peace:asian:
 
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Samurai

Samurai

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What forms (if any) are taught on these videos?

I have learned the Shotokan Karate forms up to brown belt, the Chun Do Kwan TaeKwon-do forms to black belt, and some Okinawan forms as well. I would like to see some of the Parker forms. Are they on these tapes?

I took a Chinese Kenpo class many, many years ago when I was only 9 or 10 and I still can remember some of the material some 25 years later.

thanks
Jeremy Bays
 

Blindside

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My understanding is that the IKCA does teaches only one form, the Master form. It is made up of the self-defense techniques shown on the video tapes done in a perscribed order with different facings. With each new group of techniques you learn, you get the next section of the form. There is supposed to be a form similar to Short 1 taught somewhere early in the syllabus.

In the last 6 years I have seen three IKCA schools, one was OK, the other two did not impress me. I don't know the details of how the schools train, but I felt that many of those schools basics were lacking (and I was viewing blackbelts).

The standard number forms (Short and Long 1,2,3,4 etc) that are found in both Tracy and American kenpo are not used in this system.

If you are interested in the AK forms I would recommend the Tatum tapes, though I have heard good things about the Planas tapes as well.

Lamont
 
K

Kirk

Guest
Originally posted by jazkiljok
when you say they move both feet- do you mean something akin to doing a Chubby Checker dance move? also did you see this on the vids or were you taught this yourself by the IKCA?

peace:asian:

I saw it on the vids, done my Mr Le Roux and several others.
 
K

Kirk

Guest
Originally posted by Blindside
My understanding is that the IKCA does teaches only one form, the Master form. It is made up of the self-defense techniques shown on the video tapes done in a perscribed order with different facings. With each new group of techniques you learn, you get the next section of the form. There is supposed to be a form similar to Short 1 taught somewhere early in the syllabus.

In the last 6 years I have seen three IKCA schools, one was OK, the other two did not impress me. I don't know the details of how the schools train, but I felt that many of those schools basics were lacking (and I was viewing blackbelts).

The standard number forms (Short and Long 1,2,3,4 etc) that are found in both Tracy and American kenpo are not used in this system.

If you are interested in the AK forms I would recommend the Tatum tapes, though I have heard good things about the Planas tapes as well.

Lamont

Remember, this is NOT American Kenpo. It's Chinese kenpo. I'm
similar to you, in that I've only seen three EPAK school .. one was
good, so I signed up. The other two did not impress me, and I
too was viewing black belts.
 

Blindside

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Hi Kirk I'm not sure we disagree,

When I visited the first IKCA school I viewed it from the perspective of a kajukenboist. I kept thinking "where the hell are the takedowns?" But their basics were good, they did the techniques will power and spirit, so I think of them as being pretty good.

The latter two I saw after I had switched to a Tracy/Parker hybrid system. Either my standards had gone way up or the these two schools were substandard. I have visited and studied with three EPAK instructors, two of the three impressed me.

I am not judging the system(s) because I wasn't impressed with a couple of instructors, but it will certainly bring up questions regarding what is required in the arts.

I will say that I have seen a tape of Warriorsage (he bops around this forum occasionally) doing the Master Form, and he looked good (well, except for the haircut ;)).

Lamont
 
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paul hutterer

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I have been a member of the Karate connection (I.K.C.A) for over three years and have just recently recieved my black belt. I learned from an instructor not from the tapes. Although I do have all of the tapes they are very helpfull. If there is a question as how to do something I refer to the tapes ,you have a instructor right there 24-7 that will repeat the technique as many times as you would like (just hit rewind). There are also drills on the tape to increase your reaction time in real life situations. One is called a mass atack drill ,the just of it is ,one person(the defendor) is in the middle of the room with anywhere from 2-10 people around them .There is one conductor .This conductor points to one of the attackers at random without the defendor seeing. The attackers can punch, kick or grab. The defendor has to defend the attack without hesitation to pass the drill.
I am now going to answer some of the questions some people had in this thread.
Ed Parker teaches American Kenpo and the karate connection teaches Chinese Kenpo
As for the forward bow it is used as a sweep or a leg buckel ora soild base so you can push it is not intended as a fighting stance.
Refer to Circling Serpent(purple belt tec.#3) Blinding daggers(blue belt tec#6) gathering the dragon (greenbelt tec#2) Dropping the storm (black belt tec.#1) All of these techniques use the forward bow. Even a horse stance can be unstable if you were to push someone from the front,now if you would try to push them from the side they are incredibly stable. The forward bow has the same concept.
The master form is the only form taught and is added to with each belt level until you reach black belt which is 55 techniques and takes about 3 minutes to complete.
Out of all of the base techniques there are 10 takedowns in the entire system. But the beauty of this system is once you learn it you can make anything technique a take down by simply adding it to the technique.
Also if you test by video you must send a viedo of your test in to get reviewed by Chuck Sullivan and Vic LeRoux. They will send the tape back with a video of themselves reviewing your test.
You will soon come to find out you are not just a number you are family to them. I have meet both Chuck an Vic many times and they are two incredible people!

I hope I could be of some help
Full salute ,Paul Hutterer
 
K

Kirk

Guest
Originally posted by paul hutterer
As for the forward bow it is used as a sweep or a leg buckel or a soild base so you can push it is not intended as a fighting stance.

Do you transition from a right neutral bow to a right forward bow
while executing a punch?
 

Big Pat

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I would suggest that every Kenpoist video tape themselves training. I know that many of you will be in for a big surprise. Do the techniques from the front and then the side with and without a partner. This is how Mr. Parker {8mm movies} was able to unlock and improve his techniques. He was able to fight you coming in and going out. The IKCA tapes provided me with a excellent way to renew my Kenpo training. I thank Mr. Sullivan and LeRoux for their effort.

EKP RIP

Big Pat:asian:
 
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bahenlaura

Guest
Originally posted by Big Pat
I would suggest that every Kenpoist video tape themselves training. I know that many of you will be in for a big surprise. Do the techniques from the front and then the side with and without a partner. This is how Mr. Parker {8mm movies} was able to unlock and improve his techniques. He was able to fight you coming in and going out. The IKCA tapes provided me with a excellent way to renew my Kenpo training. I thank Mr. Sullivan and LeRoux for their effort.

EKP RIP

Big Pat:asian:

;)
great idea. i do that and helps alot to see all the exess moves that one does while trying to do a tech or a form. it is a great learning tool.

:)
 
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warriorsage

Guest
"I will say that I have seen a tape of Warriorsage (he bops around this forum occasionally) doing the Master Form, and he looked good (well, except for the haircut )."

Next time I'm up in your neck of the woods with my clippers, you can kiss your pony tail goodbye!

As for the IKCA, I will add this. I've trained with several other kenpoists since joining the IKCA. Some like what the IKCA is doing, while others are adamantly opposed to it. In either case, everyone I've worked with has complimented me on my strong basics and attention to detail, which I attribute to the IKCA. And a few of them like my "high and tight" haircut too!

Whip
 

jazkiljok

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Originally posted by paul hutterer

As for the forward bow it is used as a sweep or a leg buckel ora soild base so you can push it is not intended as a fighting stance.

.. Even a horse stance can be unstable if you were to push someone from the front,now if you would try to push them from the side they are incredibly stable. The forward bow has the same concept.

Full salute ,Paul Hutterer

i'd be curious to see how you sweep with a forward bow (is that front or back leg doing the sweeping?)

forward bows are normally seen as transitional stances this is true- but stability and strength does depend on proper alignments- drop into a horse stance point your toes out-- the stance loses stability- pushing from the side in a bad horse stance, it will feel weak.

feet, knees, hips, spine, head all play important roles in any stance- any one of these out of alignment and the stance can fail.

but again-how do they teach the transition from neutral to forward- do they teach to "move both feet" - can you give any specifics.

simply curious as to their method.

peace:asian:
 

Blindside

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Next time I'm up in your neck of the woods with my clippers, you can kiss your pony tail goodbye!

Uh huh,

Hey Ron have you ever been to Wyoming? Big wide open spaces, I promise you they will never find your body. :D

Lamont
 
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paul hutterer

Guest
Originally posted by jazkiljok
i'd be curious to see how you sweep with a forward bow (is that front or back leg doing the sweeping?)

forward bows are normally seen as transitional stances this is true- but stability and strength does depend on proper alignments- drop into a horse stance point your toes out-- the stance loses stability- pushing from the side in a bad horse stance, it will feel weak.

feet, knees, hips, spine, head all play important roles in any stance- any one of these out of alignment and the stance can fail.

but again-how do they teach the transition from neutral to forward- do they teach to "move both feet" - can you give any specifics.

simply curious as to their method.

peace:asian:

You end up in a forward bow once your done sweeping with your back leg.Here is a detialed description of one of the first techniques of green belt using a forward bow as a leg buckle.
GATHERING THE DRAGON- defense against a left punch - outside(step forward into a right cross stance while doing a parry block first with right arm to your left shoulder then the left ,going right into a right raking back fist to attackers ribs , this will bend the attacker over , then rear cross with your left foot while striking attackers face with your left palm , finally step back with your right leg to take there left leg out and fore arm the back of the attackers neck to take them to the ground ending in a left forward bow.

So you see there is never a time where you are going to just transition from a neutral bow to a forward bow. You end up in a forward as a result of a leg buckle. There is instances where you transition from a neutral bow to a rear bow . This may be where some people see both feet pivoting at the same time. But again this stance change is used to destroy the attackers knee by extending there knee the wrong way(painfull).
Here is an example of a technique using a rear bow as a leg buckle
ƒËRAKING HAMMER defense against a left roundhouse punch- inside(step back into a right neutral bow right outside block, then step drag forward(note: your right leg should end up right next to there left leg) and rake attackers face with a right back fist, next drop and do a hammer fist to there groin ,finally spin into a rear bow to a right elbow under the chin at the same time ,ending in a right rear bow.
When going from one stance to another we always pivot on the balls of our feet never our heels.
Full salute , Paul

If you lose dont lose the lesson
 
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