Jujutsu

Bob Hubbard

Retired
MT Mentor
Founding Member
Lifetime Supporting Member
MTS Alumni
Joined
Aug 4, 2001
Messages
47,245
Reaction score
772
Location
Land of the Free
From the rec.martialarts FAQ

(Contributor: Darren Wilkinson - [email protected])

Intro:

Old, practical, fighting art. A parent to Judo, Aikido, and Hapkido.

Origin: Japan

History:

The begining of Ju-jutsu can be found in the turbulent period of
Japanese history between the 8th and 16th Century. During this time,
there was almost constant civil war in Japan and the classical
weaponed systems were developed and constantly refined on the battle
field. Close fighting techniques were developed as part of these
systems to be use in conjunction with weapons against armoured, armed
apponents. It was from these techniques that Ju-jutsu arose.

The first publicly recognised Ju-jutsu ryu was formed by Takenouchie
Hisamori in 1532 and consisted of techniques of sword, jo-stick and
dagger as well as unarmed techniques.

In 1603, Tokugawa Ieyasu brought peace to Japan by forming the
Tokugawa military government. This marked the beginning of the Edo
period of Japanese history (1603-1868), during which waring ceased to
be a dominant feature of Japanese life.

In the beginning of this period there was a general shift from
weaponed forms of fighting to weaponless styles. These weaponless
styles were developed from the grappling techniques of the weaponed
styles and were collectively known as ju-jutsu. During the height of
the Edo period, there were more than 700 systems of jujutsu.

The end of the Edo was marked by the Meiji Restoration, an abortive
civil war that moved power from the Shogun back to the Emperor. A
large proportion of the Samurai class supported the Shogun during the
war. Consequently, when power was restored to the Emperor, many things
related to the Samurai fell into disrepute. An Imperial edict was
decreed, declaring it a criminal offence to practice the old style
combative martial arts. During the period of the Imperial edict,
Ju-jutsu was almost lost. However, some masters continued to practice
their art "under-ground", or moved to other countries, allowing the
style to continue. By the mid twenty century, the ban on ju-jutsu in
Japan had lifted, allowing the free practicing of the art.

Description:

The style encompasses throws, locks, and striking techniques, with a
strong emphasis on throws, locks, and defensive techniques. It is
also characterized by in-fighting and close work. It is a circular,
hard/soft, external style.

Training: Practical with a heavy emphasis on sparring and mock combat.

Sub-Styles:

There are many, each associated with a different "school" (Ryu). Here
is a partial list: Daito Ryu, Danzan Ryu, Shidare Yanagi Ryu, Hokuto
Ryu, Hakko Ryu, Hontai Yoshin Ryu, Sosuishi Ryu, Kito Ryu, Kyushin Ryu.

A more modern addition to this list is "Brazilian Jujutsu" or "Gracie
Jujutsu", so named because of its development by the Gracie family of
Brazil. Gracie/Brazilian Jujutsu (or GJJ/BJJ as it has come to be
known on rec.martial-arts) has a heavy emphasis on
grappling/groundfighting.
 
Originally posted by Kaith Rustaz
From the rec.martialarts FAQ

(Contributor: Darren Wilkinson - [email protected])

Intro:

Old, practical, fighting art. A parent to Judo, Aikido, and Hapkido.

Origin: Japan

History:

The begining of Ju-jutsu can be found in the turbulent period of
Japanese history between the 8th and 16th Century. During this time,
there was almost constant civil war in Japan and the classical
weaponed systems were developed and constantly refined on the battle
field. Close fighting techniques were developed as part of these
systems to be use in conjunction with weapons against armoured, armed
apponents. It was from these techniques that Ju-jutsu arose.

The first publicly recognised Ju-jutsu ryu was formed by Takenouchie
Hisamori in 1532 and consisted of techniques of sword, jo-stick and
dagger as well as unarmed techniques.

In 1603, Tokugawa Ieyasu brought peace to Japan by forming the
Tokugawa military government. This marked the beginning of the Edo
period of Japanese history (1603-1868), during which waring ceased to
be a dominant feature of Japanese life.

In the beginning of this period there was a general shift from
weaponed forms of fighting to weaponless styles. These weaponless
styles were developed from the grappling techniques of the weaponed
styles and were collectively known as ju-jutsu. During the height of
the Edo period, there were more than 700 systems of jujutsu.

The end of the Edo was marked by the Meiji Restoration, an abortive
civil war that moved power from the Shogun back to the Emperor. A
large proportion of the Samurai class supported the Shogun during the
war. Consequently, when power was restored to the Emperor, many things
related to the Samurai fell into disrepute. An Imperial edict was
decreed, declaring it a criminal offence to practice the old style
combative martial arts. During the period of the Imperial edict,
Ju-jutsu was almost lost. However, some masters continued to practice
their art "under-ground", or moved to other countries, allowing the
style to continue. By the mid twenty century, the ban on ju-jutsu in
Japan had lifted, allowing the free practicing of the art.

Description:

The style encompasses throws, locks, and striking techniques, with a
strong emphasis on throws, locks, and defensive techniques. It is
also characterized by in-fighting and close work. It is a circular,
hard/soft, external style.

Training: Practical with a heavy emphasis on sparring and mock combat.

Sub-Styles:

There are many, each associated with a different "school" (Ryu). Here
is a partial list: Daito Ryu, Danzan Ryu, Shidare Yanagi Ryu, Hokuto
Ryu, Hakko Ryu, Hontai Yoshin Ryu, Sosuishi Ryu, Kito Ryu, Kyushin Ryu.

A more modern addition to this list is "Brazilian Jujutsu" or "Gracie
Jujutsu", so named because of its development by the Gracie family of
Brazil. Gracie/Brazilian Jujutsu (or GJJ/BJJ as it has come to be
known on rec.martial-arts) has a heavy emphasis on
grappling/groundfighting.
Your information is very good. I will address the time a little before the coined term jujutsu. Himitsu Kempo Jujutsu: Prior to the development of jujutsu as a separate art, many variations of the empty hand arts existed in japan. The oldest primary fighting art was said to have been Kumi Uchi, or grappling and striking. As the samurai started to wear armor for protection the art developed into Yoroi Kumi Uchi or amored grappling and striking. Central to the temple martial arts training(chinese) was the empty hand art of kempo. At one time in the history of jujutsu, all styles were called kempo, as not to let one school's student know what school he/she was from when holding conversation in public! The japanese monks modified this kempo and innovations were added for combat in their own country. This training was called Himitsu Kempo, which means hidden martial arts. " The farmers who lived around the temples, and villages that were close by; relied on the temples for religious guidance and wisdom. When the people needed instruction on how to defend themselves from bandits and how to protect themselves from unfair taxation, they turned to the temples who helped lead revolts against the unfair government practices and taught them the aspect of martial arts"[1]. Some of the farmers became Jisamurai or rual warriors whom fought for their lords (daimyo) and became the standing army of the samurai. These were the samurai which developed their own forms of hand to hand martial skills and gave their respective arts names such as; Yawara, Kogusoku,Tendori, Torite, Muto, Roikumiuchi, Taijutsu, and Wajutsu, while others called their art Kempo. The kempo of the monks was kept secret and only a chosen few were (those of the temples or families whom were strong supporters) were allowed to learn. So, several of the top rual families' masters were allowed to learn the secrets of Jikempo or Himitsu Kempo temple arts. "Eventually in the 16th century, some say later, the term Jujutsu was coined as a generic name for empty hand fighting"[2]. Regardless of the names of the arts of jujutsu; they all contained the skills of locking, choking, striking, kicking and throwing. These respective skills of the jujutsuka were taught to blend in with weapons use, to base the skill of the weapon on empty hand training and the empty hand skill improving weapon's training! " One of the secret traditions of the Okuden of Himitsu Kempo Jujutsu was the knowledge and ability to blend strikes and throws together. Under armored conditions, strikes were not as important as under normal circumstances, but particularly after the Tokugawa era and into the Meiji Restoration, striking skills became much more important in personal self defense, which was the way empty hand skills were developing. Jujutsu has always thought to be an art which focused on throwing skills, while kempo focusing on strikes. The truth is the japanese kempo of the ancient varity is one of the predecessor arts to jujutsu, with a full range of skills that can at a moments notice switch from throwing to striking and back to throwing. This was the way the art was designed "[3]. The jujutsuka in the classical tradition is one who knows how to create the opening for a throw by using judicious strikes. "This is the Okuden (hidden traditions) of the Himitsu Kempo Jujutsu; classical martial arts designed and geared towards the reality of combat"[4]! Source Article; 1,2,3,&4: Himitsu Kempo Jujutsu: Okuden - A Secret Tradition/ Soke Dr. William Durbin, Kiyojute Ryu Kempo Bugei: Sincerely, In Humility; Chiduce!
 

Latest Discussions

Back
Top