Is there an effective beginner friendly martial art that fits my mentality?

Mallic

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Ok I'm going to have to word this very carefully. I admit that while I am largely book smart when it comes to the theory and history of martial arts, I admit I have little experience in the actual practice of it as I've simply not had the time, something I wish to change.

However, my studies have made it clear what styles of fighting click with me. Styles like Outboxing, Counterstriking, Hapkido, Destreza, Bartitsu, Fighters like Muhammad Ali and Floyd Mayweather, basically anything that centers around fighting smart or using your opponent's aggression against them as attempts to be the aggressor or instigator have historically ended...uh...poorly.

The issue comes with finding a gym that would stick because I know that for many people the preferred strategy is to fight aggression with aggression in an attempt to end the fight as soon as possible. However, if you don't do it right all that happens is you leave yourself wide open for attack. Plus, most MMA gyms in my area seem to focus largely if not entirely on BJJ, which I don't have the fondest opinion of. Not that it's bad or worthless or anything like that, I just find that centering your entire fighting style around being on the ground is rather short sighted. Plus, it's been overhyped and too many people IMO treat it as a one size fits all solution to all self-defense situations, and its flaws are so numerous that I can't really ignore them.

But I digress, I ask again, is there a beginner friendly martial art, that favors calm thinking and countering aggression that would be practical outside the ring? If not, then what fighting style however hard it would be worth looking into?
 

Monkey Turned Wolf

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The only arts i can think of that don't fit what you're saying, are sumo, kyokushin, and krav maga. Pretty much everything else doesnt seem to have the focus on aggression that you're imagining.
 

JowGaWolf

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All martial arts stress calm minds. Think of walking on a tight rope 400 feet up. The last thing you'll want to deal with are emotions. It's the same with martial arts. You don't want things to get in the way of your focus.

Most traditional arts are focused on fighting outside of the ring. Most are cruel.

Fighting smart is real and dangerous gor the person who has to deal with the smart fightet.

Turning your opponent's aggressoon against them is also real. Brawlers are aggressive and they are one of the easiest type of fighters or attackers to deal with. They are straight forward which makes it easier for me to use Jow Ga kung fu.

If I were you I would decide if I want learn weapons. If yes, then take a Chinese martial art that teaches staff, sword, and knife. If weapons aren't an interest. Then take any martial art that is practical.

My guess is that you will have a reality shift once you start training and actually using the techniques.
 
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Mallic

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All martial arts stress calm minds. Think of walking on a tight rope 400 feet up. The last thing you'll want to deal with are emotions. It's the same with martial arts. You don't want things to get in the way of your focus.

Most traditional arts are focused on fighting outside of the ring. Most are cruel.

Fighting smart is real and dangerous gor the person who has to deal with the smart fightet.

Turning your opponent's aggressoon against them is also real. Brawlers are aggressive and they are one of the easiest type of fighters or attackers to deal with. They are straight forward which makes it easier for me to use Jow Ga kung fu.

If I were you I would decide if I want learn weapons. If yes, then take a Chinese martial art that teaches staff, sword, and knife. If weapons aren't an interest. Then take any martial art that is practical.

My guess is that you will have a reality shift once you start training and actually using the techniques.
I wouldn't mind learning weapons but I feel the only one that would be of any use would be the staff and maybe the knife
 

JowGaWolf

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I wouldn't mind learning weapons but I feel the only one that would be of any use would be the staff and maybe the knife
All of them are of use if you know how to use them. The only real question is the opportunity for using them, which you want to be low
 

HighKick

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Ok I'm going to have to word this very carefully. I admit that while I am largely book smart when it comes to the theory and history of martial arts, I admit I have little experience in the actual practice of it as I've simply not had the time, something I wish to change.

However, my studies have made it clear what styles of fighting click with me. Styles like Outboxing, Counterstriking, Hapkido, Destreza, Bartitsu, Fighters like Muhammad Ali and Floyd Mayweather, basically anything that centers around fighting smart or using your opponent's aggression against them as attempts to be the aggressor or instigator have historically ended...uh...poorly.

The issue comes with finding a gym that would stick because I know that for many people the preferred strategy is to fight aggression with aggression in an attempt to end the fight as soon as possible. However, if you don't do it right all that happens is you leave yourself wide open for attack. Plus, most MMA gyms in my area seem to focus largely if not entirely on BJJ, which I don't have the fondest opinion of. Not that it's bad or worthless or anything like that, I just find that centering your entire fighting style around being on the ground is rather short sighted. Plus, it's been overhyped and too many people IMO treat it as a one size fits all solution to all self-defense situations, and its flaws are so numerous that I can't really ignore them.

But I digress, I ask again, is there a beginner friendly martial art, that favors calm thinking and countering aggression that would be practical outside the ring? If not, then what fighting style however hard it would be worth looking into?
It is really pretty simple. Sample the schools in your area and see what sticks.

FWIW, all that you think you know is going out the window in the beginning. Believe me, that is a good thing.
 

ShortBridge

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I'll make what might seem like an odd suggestion: Spend time, at least 6 months training in a school that will push you hard and get you out of your head, rather than seeking one that plays to you analytical sense.

I like the theory and science of all of this too, but you need balance. Most styles COULD be effective and the best one is the one that you'll be able to apply. I've seen a lot of people crippled by the analytical process of fighting. Get some sweat and bruises and then maybe come back to it. The danger of finding a style/teacher that plays to the approach that you are self described as being heavy on is that it might push you deeper that way.

You said "effective". If that's important to you, I think you should get out of your comfort zone for a while. Not everyone is going for effective. There are places and people that go deep down that tunnel without feeling the need to be application ready and more power to 'um, but it sounds like that's not what you want.
 

ShortBridge

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I also think that any style or system is or should be "beginner friendly". The club and the teacher may or may not be, but not the style.

As others have pointed out and as you foretold with "...I am largely book smart when it comes to the theory...", searching for the perfect style is a theoretical exercise if it's not taught in your area. I have spent too much of my life wishing that wasn't the case.

Your exercise should be determining what is available to you and then checking each out to see what feels like the best option to you. It doesn't have to be your final answer, but training is better than not training, so at some point, you've just got to jump in the pool.
 

Instructor

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Ok I'm going to have to word this very carefully. I admit that while I am largely book smart when it comes to the theory and history of martial arts, I admit I have little experience in the actual practice of it as I've simply not had the time, something I wish to change.

However, my studies have made it clear what styles of fighting click with me. Styles like Outboxing, Counterstriking, Hapkido, Destreza, Bartitsu, Fighters like Muhammad Ali and Floyd Mayweather, basically anything that centers around fighting smart or using your opponent's aggression against them as attempts to be the aggressor or instigator have historically ended...uh...poorly.

The issue comes with finding a gym that would stick because I know that for many people the preferred strategy is to fight aggression with aggression in an attempt to end the fight as soon as possible. However, if you don't do it right all that happens is you leave yourself wide open for attack. Plus, most MMA gyms in my area seem to focus largely if not entirely on BJJ, which I don't have the fondest opinion of. Not that it's bad or worthless or anything like that, I just find that centering your entire fighting style around being on the ground is rather short sighted. Plus, it's been overhyped and too many people IMO treat it as a one size fits all solution to all self-defense situations, and its flaws are so numerous that I can't really ignore them.

But I digress, I ask again, is there a beginner friendly martial art, that favors calm thinking and countering aggression that would be practical outside the ring? If not, then what fighting style however hard it would be worth looking into?
Get out of you head and get into a school, dojo, gym, or whatever you have around. Get involved, the rest will sort itself out.
 

Gyakuto

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I ask again, is there a beginner friendly martial art,
If by beginner friendly you mean easy to acquire, then I dont think so. Martial arts are difficult in which to become competent which is why they have such a high attrition rate.
that favors calm thinking and countering aggression that would be practical outside the ring?
Calm thinking? Being good at fighting will reassure you but theres always adrenaline puddling ones calm thought processes. Mike Tyson said, Everyone has a plan until they get a punch in the face!
If not, then what fighting style however hard it would be worth looking into?
Marksmanship.
 
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mograph

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  • If the school isn't located near you, you probably won't go. This is normal.
  • the teacher and school atmosphere is just as (more?) important than the theory of the art.
  • we western types tend to get too much in our heads, avoiding direct experience. That's what matters: actually showing up and learning from direct experience. Where the rubber meets the road.
You might want to clarify exactly why you want to physically experience the study of a martial art. To hit, throw, block, grapple, get sweaty, get hit, risk injury, and actually discover your real strengths and weaknesses under pressure.
 
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Mallic

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@Mallic, what did you choose?
Well for now I'll probably keep it simple and start with outboxing style kickboxing, it can be self-taught the fundamentals are basically the same between boxing and kickboxing and I can integrate parts and philosophies of other martial arts as I go.
 

gyoja

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Well for now I'll probably keep it simple and start with outboxing style kickboxing, it can be self-taught the fundamentals are basically the same between boxing and kickboxing and I can integrate parts and philosophies of other martial arts as I go.
I guess that means that you couldnt find a local school that you liked?
 
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