Is it true...the blacker the blade the more the carbon it contains?

C

Cobra

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I have bought all my swords off the internet, just about all of them are in carbon steel. Today I went to a sword store at a mall today and asked the store whether they had carbon steel swords. The man showed me two swords, both had black blades. He told me that the more blacker the blade, the more carbon it has. These blades were completly black. My carbon blades are not black at all. And I've never seen or heard such a thing.

Is it true the blacker the blade, the more the carbon? Or was he lying or didn't know what he was talking about?
 

Touch Of Death

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I happen to be somewhat of an expert on this question. (in part at least)
The answer is no. Blades can be chemicaly coated (called Blackening) or Heat treated in a lye solution (black Oxide). Carbon content is at play but I just raise or lower the temp of my oxide tank. :asian:
Sean
 
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C

Chrono

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Touch'O'Death said:
I happen to be somewhat of an expert on this question. (in part at least)
The answer is no. Blades can be chemicaly coated (called Blackening) or Heat treated in a lye solution (black Oxide). Carbon content is at play but I just raise or lower the temp of my oxide tank. :asian:
Sean
Cool stuff, Sean. But, I'm curious, is there any reason for doing that to a sword?

Jon
 

Touch Of Death

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I put the black on, I don't ponder the reason; however, the surface is harder being that oxide is a controled rust. Ninjas might dig the black blade for when they don't want there victim to see the glint of the blade against the moonlight... I don't friggin know. The blade itself can be re-oxided if it gets scratched though. The downside is that with oxide you will need to keep the blade a bit oily or it will rust.
Sean
 

Touch Of Death

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One more thing...
Just imagine encasing your sword in a microthin super hard layer of stone. I mainly work with drill bits and countersinks but the process brings top dollar for cutting implements. :asian:
Sean
 
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Nikolas P.

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I wouldn't mind having one of my shinken oxidized I imagine it would make it easier to gauge the speed of the blade in bright conditions. (Contrast between black steel and white surroundings.)
 

Touch Of Death

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Nikolas P. said:
I wouldn't mind having one of my shinken oxidized I imagine it would make it easier to gauge the speed of the blade in bright conditions. (Contrast between black steel and white surroundings.)
Yes, but there mind might not register exactly what it is until too late. I'm sure there is a Metal finishing company in your area...
Sean
PS or you could send it to spokane :uhyeah:
 
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OLDSAMURAI

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Being a professional bladesmith, Ill try to answer your question with some
helpfull info.

1. when you say " black coating" you need to be more exact and specific,
what type of coating is it ? is it PVD-BC ? is it ELECTRICALLY APPLIED OXIDE ?
is it TiNitride ? is it just plain old "tool black" ?
BECAUSE EACH OF THESE ARE APPLIED FOR DIFFERENT REASONS TO METAL
NONE OF WHICH HAS ANYTHING TO DO WITH MAKING THE BLADE STRONGER.
YOU WILL BE SADLY DISSAPOINTED TO LEARN THAT MOST MODERN KNIFE MAKING COMPANIES USE A COATING TO HIDE FLAWS IN BLADE METAL THAT COMES FROM BUYING "SECONDS" IN QUALITY FROM THE FOUNDRYS. A GOOD
TiNi BLACK COATING CAN/DOES HIDE SEVERE PITTING, CORROSION, BAD SURFACE TOLERANCES... THAT WOULD COST A FORTUNE FOR THE COMPANY TO WORK OUT OF THE BLADE, MOST ACTUALLY WOULD END UP IN THE TRASH. I cant tell you how many hundreds of blades ive removed coatings from to mirror polish the blade and found what looked like moon craters or 00 shotgun blast in the blade, and alot of them have been filled with some metalic epoxy to fill the voids and pits.
As the other Gent said, he puts coatings on tools, why ? because it makes an inferior metal temporarily preform like a superior alloy.. untill it wears off..
( not dissing your job.. just explaining the reason its done)
since you SHOULD ONLY own a blade that is NOT STAINLESS in a katana, the deposition of MOST ANY SURFACE COATING will cause the blade underneath to corrode inwards.. one day 4 or 5 years down the road...
its going to break...AND THAT IS DANGEROUS !
MY ADVISE... SPEND YOUR MONEY ON THE BEST BLADE QUALITY, SOME GOOD OIL..AND PROPER USE AND MAINTANCE... YOU WILL BE FAR MORE SATISFIED....
OS
 

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