I don't know Chon-ji

Sabo

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As an Il gup getting ready for my 1st Dan test I was reviewing my poomsae. during this time I decided that I hadn't fully understood the first form in my organization's system. GGM Lee H. Park kept part of the Chang Han forms in our system and the thought occurred to me that I had not fully contemplated the full complexity of its most simple form. A lot of it had to do with timing. I now try to pass my thoughts along to my students with some slight amount of difficulty. ( I specialize in the area of 5-6 year olds and special needs).

To the Instructors on this forum...does anyone, from time to time, re-evaluate your forms (Chang Han or Taeguek) years after you "considered" yourself learned in said forms? Not because the WTF ofr ITF have changed them, but because you realize something about technique/timing that you missed along the way and are just now catching up with you.

It appears that I find myself re-evaluating all forms that I know using different body geometry and motion as my training progresses.

Am I going off of the deep end?
 

Marginal

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I don't teach, but I've always been advised by my instructors to constantly reapply what I've learned to all the patterns I've been doing so far.

I don't think you're off the deep end at all.
 

granfire

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a couple of years ago I attended a workshop, all Black belts from our organization.

We went over the white and yellow belt forms. and even though most of us were actually teaching these forms every day in class, the instructor found many ways to improve on the forms.

Part is that we never do them in one piece anymore, always looking what the student does etc. or we just been doing it for so long we stop paying attention.

So yes, I know all the moves, but certainly can do the form much better: concentrate on the correct placement of the strikes, kicks and stances, how to reach for blocks, the works.
 

terryl965

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We must always go back and re-think our applications and find new ways to apply those application. It is part of becomming an instructor.
 

StuartA

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Heres the thing:

To a yellow belt - Won-Hyo (for example) is a seniors form.
To a green belt - Won-Hyo is a grading form
To a blue/red/black belt - Won-Hyo is simply a way to train, no more and no less important than Chon-Ji, Dan-Gun, Do-Dan, Joong-Gun etc.

Forms should be practiced by all levels, as often as possible. As you quite rightly point out, how you apply your knowledge to it as a junior grade is very different from applying your knowledge to it as a senior. You see things you never noticed before or apply principles you couldnt before, thus the training, using the same tool (Chon-Ji in your case) evolves and helps you evolve as well!

Stuart
 

searcher

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I am with you on going back and re-evaluating the forms. There are times when I find myself doing forms practice and rushing through the beginner forms to get to the BB forms.
 

mozzandherb

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Being off from training for nearly 10 years going back was hard, but it wasn't that I didn't know the movements, it's just the style had changed a little from what I was taught and from what is being done now.
For example sine-wave in tournaments was not as pronounced in 1990 than it is now.
I have to re-evaluate all the forms from the beginning to the end, and it started today when we went over Chon-Ji 100 times for team training. I love patterns, but being away and with some of the movements being different than what I'm used to, re-evaluation is definitely important at all levels
 
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