How do you do Kum Gang?

Laurentkd

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A couple people have mentioned doing a lot of "stomping" in Kum Gang, which we do at my dojang as well. We also do the entire form very slow and deliberate, with a sort of "tension" power. Sort of like someone is holding your arm back as you try to pull it forward, and then SNAP it at the end of the technique.
I think this is the form I see done with many different interpretations the most and I am curious what different interpretations we have here in out MT world.
 

Bret Hinds

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I do the form Kumkang,is this the same form you call Kum Gang? We put a lot of power movement in this form. This is a slow but powerful form it gets its name from the Taebek mountain range. The kicks that are in it are done as a outside crescent kick with a slow rechamber no stomp. Some kwans ad stomps and such to there forms as a trademark of there kwanjang nim. I love doing this form because of my body build. all the best in the arts
 
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Laurentkd

Laurentkd

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I do the form Kumkang,is this the same form you call Kum Gang? We put a lot of power movement in this form. This is a slow but powerful form it gets its name from the Taebek mountain range. The kicks that are in it are done as a outside crescent kick with a slow rechamber no stomp. Some kwans ad stomps and such to there forms as a trademark of there kwanjang nim. I love doing this form because of my body build. all the best in the arts

Do you throw high outside crescents or are they more like sweeps? (this can be answered by anyone of course!)
 

Miles

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We stomp at the 2 points where there are kihaps. I was talking to MSUTKD about this poomsae not too long ago and he mentioned that for competition, the judges do not wish to see snapping heads....I teach my students to look straight ahead while doing the slow, tensioned Keumgang makki in haktari seogi until the final second and then snap the head. Got to keep up with the times!!!

Miles
 
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Laurentkd

Laurentkd

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We stomp at the 2 points where there are kihaps. I was talking to MSUTKD about this poomsae not too long ago and he mentioned that for competition, the judges do not wish to see snapping heads....I teach my students to look straight ahead while doing the slow, tensioned Keumgang makki in haktari seogi until the final second and then snap the head. Got to keep up with the times!!!

Miles

We do it that way too. I think it looks sharp! Maybe it is time to teach my students a "school KG" and a "competition KG"
 

deadhand31

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We are taught to do the stomp at each of the four kum gang blocks. To lead into that stance, we sweep with the non-pivoting leg, as if to pull the opponents' leg off balance. The stomp is then meant to break their knee. This is the interpretation that I seem to understand best.

Anyone have any others?
 

IcemanSK

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We stomp at the 2 points where there are kihaps. I was talking to MSUTKD about this poomsae not too long ago and he mentioned that for competition, the judges do not wish to see snapping heads....I teach my students to look straight ahead while doing the slow, tensioned Keumgang makki in haktari seogi until the final second and then snap the head. Got to keep up with the times!!!

Miles

We do it the same way. (stomp & kihap). A difference from the World Championship way is the count on the "Soo Bahk Do" stances (one-legged stances). In the world championship they hod it for a count of 5-8 it seems. LF & I were in a seminar with GM Park, Hae Man (who helped design the poomsae) last year. He said that count "should be 10. 12 is better." So I guess we do it "old school.":ultracool
 
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Laurentkd

Laurentkd

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We do it the same way. (stomp & kihap). A difference from the World Championship way is the count on the "Soo Bahk Do" stances (one-legged stances). In the world championship they hod it for a count of 5-8 it seems. LF & I were in a seminar with GM Park, Hae Man (who helped design the poomsae) last year. He said that count "should be 10. 12 is better." So I guess we do it "old school.":ultracool


So do you hold the "finished" move for that long, or do you slowly move into the finished move for that long. We bring the leg up slowly and slowly move both arms from a charged position (one high one low) until they reach about face level and then snap into the finished move (with the head turn).

I'll bet that was a GREAT seminar!
 

IcemanSK

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So do you hold the "finished" move for that long, or do you slowly move into the finished move for that long. We bring the leg up slowly and slowly move both arms from a charged position (one high one low) until they reach about face level and then snap into the finished move (with the head turn).

I'll bet that was a GREAT seminar!

Ah yes, we do it slloowwly & then snap into position (we look in the direction the whole time). It was a great seminar with GM Park. It was especially nerve-racking for me because we were going from Koryo through Pyongwon & I had only ever done Koryo. If LastFearner hadn't been next to me talking me through them, I'd have been sunk.
 
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Laurentkd

Laurentkd

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Ah yes, we do it slloowwly & then snap into position (we look in the direction the whole time). It was a great seminar with GM Park. It was especially nerve-racking for me because we were going from Koryo through Pyongwon & I had only ever done Koryo. If LastFearner hadn't been next to me talking me through them, I'd have been sunk.



It is so great to find out other martial artists here that I respect who do the form the same way we do it! I thought we were just out of the TKD loop somehow. I guess instead we are just out of the tournament loop, and really (call me old school but) who cares how they do it there?

I would love to hear more about the seminar if you get a chance Iceman!
 
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