Help with finding best style for me

2020warrior

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Hello. New member. First post.

I need some help deciding on a style that will suit my needs. I have danced around with different styles here and there but none longer than a year. Muay Thai for about 9 months. Bujinkan Ninjutsu for about 6 months. Krav Maga for 1 year. Liked Muay Thai, but not really interested in competing, and there is no ranking system. Bujinkan was very cool, but the school here did shady business, so I left. Krav Maga was amazing, but because of my sweating problem (see below), uh, no I can't test up because I completely drain myself of all electrolytes after the 7+ hour test. Cramps everywhere.

More info on me. I love running, but even with that I have to limit myself due to excercise induced hyperhidrosis. I will lose 3.5 lbs of sweat in 40 minutes over an easy jog. Most of that sweat is all from my shoulders/neck/scalp. I'm a sweat machine. So I want a style where I don't have to look silly asking for a special testing environment. I was really upset after the Krav test. I had the will and the wind to go on. Everything from my abs down just locked up, despite gallons of strong electrolyte fluids I brought with me. I didn't pee for like 8 hours after the test.

In addition, I have a strabismus (outward eye turn). I have 20/15 vision uncorrected, but I always technically see double. I pick one eye to look and really just suppress the other eye. This makes blocks from straight punches extremely difficult for me to block. Of course with training it would improve, but never to the point that a person with normal vision would see. Zero stereopsis/depth perception. None!

So, in short: I want a style that:
Emphasizes attacks and defenses from angles other than the front.
Doesn't have a level-up exam that will severely dehydrate me.
Is good for self defense, fitness, and one that deals more with strong blows rather than quick straight attacks
Has a belt/sash/or level system

Thoughts?

TIA

Eric
 

Martial D

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Is good for self defense and has a belt system. No straight punches.

Hmmm

...

BJJ or Judo.
 

jobo

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Is good for self defense and has a belt system. No straight punches.

Hmmm

...

BJJ or Judo.
this really,all the striking art that allow real punches allow straight punches, so either do one that has only light contact or do grappling.
7 hours is ridiculous, you can run a marathon in three, what the hell are they trying to prove with that?
 

Headhunter

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So what're you going to do if you get attacked and someone throws straight punches at you? Personally if that's something you know you can train to get better then train it. Yeah it won't be easy but training isn't easy
 

drop bear

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I wil second the BJJ or judo.

And gastrolite.
images
 

Ironbear24

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Um, I don't know to be honest. Wish I could help more.
 

webmaster786

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If You would like an athletic art, try these..
Judo
Wah Lum Kung Fu.
Taekwondo
Contemporary Wushu (Xma)
To Voltage R, You know I'm a karate instructor. If you like come try some struggle moves on me. I'll show you the meaning of martial arts and what style suits you in your training session.Personally, I like TKD not Karate but most of the time I have seen some contrasting styles of Karate and my favorite is Kyoukushin Karate then comes Shotokan Karate.
 

oftheherd1

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Have seen a doctor? It seems there are some treatment successes. I am sure you can find other treatment suggestions. Luckily they seem to abound. I knew a guy in the mid-80s, in Korea, who could not find any solutions other than several showers a day, and that wasn't really very effective.

An Overview of Hyperhidrosis, or Excessive Sweating

What Is Hyperhidrosis?

Hyperhidrosis, or excessive sweating, is a common disorder which produces a lot of unhappiness. An estimated 2%-3% of Americans suffer from excessive sweating of the underarms (axillary hyperhidrosis) or of the palms and soles of the feet (palmoplantar hyperhidrosis). Underarm problems tend to start in late adolescence, while palm and sole sweating often begins earlier, around age 13 (on the average). Untreated, these problems may continue throughout life.

Sweating is embarrassing, it stains clothes, ruins romance, and complicates business and social interactions. Severe cases can have serious practical consequences as well, making it hard for people who suffer from it to hold a pen, grip a car steering wheel, or shake hands.

What Causes Hyperhidrosis?
Although neurologic, endocrine, infectious, and other systemic diseases can sometimes cause hyperhidrosis, most cases occur in people who are otherwise healthy. Heat and emotions may trigger hyperhidrosis in some, but many who suffer from hyperhidrosis sweat nearly all their waking hours, regardless of their mood or the weather.

What is the Treatment for Hyperhidrosis?
Through a systematic evaluation of causes and triggers of hyperhidrosis, followed by a judicious, stepwise approach to treatment, many people with this annoying disorder can sometimes achieve good results and improved quality of life.

The approach to treating excessive sweating generally proceeds as follows:

  • Over-the-counter antiperspirants containing a low dose of metal salt (usually aluminum) are usually tried first because they are readily available. Antiperspirants containing aluminum chloride (for example Certain Dri) may be more effective when other antiperspirants have failed.
  • Prescription strength antiperspirants, which contain aluminum chloride hexahydrate.
  • Iontophoresis, a device which passes ionized tap water through the skin using direct electricity.
  • Oral medications, Anticholinergics reduce sweating.
  • Botox (botulinum toxin)-A, has been approved in the U.S. by the FDA for treating excessive axillary (underarm) sweating.
  • miraDry. This technique uses microwave energy to permanently kill sweat glands.
  • Lasers. Lasers can target and kill the underarm sweat glands.
  • Surgery. A procedure called thoracic sympathectomy may be considered as a last resort.


Aluminum Chloride Hexahydrate and Excessive Sweating
When regular antiperspirants fail to treat excessive sweating, most doctors start by recommending aluminum chloride hexahydrate (Drysol), a prescription-strength version of aluminum chloride. It is applied just before bedtime 2 to 3 nights in a row, then roughly once a week thereafter to maintain improvement. Use as directed by your doctor.This treatment works reasonably well for many patients whose problem is excessive underarm sweating, but it is not satisfactory for most of those with palm and sole sweating.

The main side effect of Drysol is irritation, which can sometimes, but not always, be overcome by making sure the skin is dry before application and letting the medicine dry completely afterwards. Also, reducing the frequency of use or applying anti-inflammatory drugs, such as lotions containing a corticosteroid may help.

Iontophoresis for Excessive Sweating

Iontophoresis was introduced over 50 years ago as a treatment for excessive sweating. Its exact mechanism of action is still unclear, although it probably works by temporarily blocking the sweat duct. The procedure uses water to conduct an electric current to the skin a few times each week, for about 10-20 minutes per session, followed by a maintenance program of treatments at 1- to 3-week intervals, depending on the patient's response. Iontophoresis treatments are not painful.

Patients may purchase devices for this treatment through a doctors prescription. Medical insurers sometimes cover the cost.

Oral Drugs for Excessive Sweating

Oral anticholinergic drugs such as glycopyrrolate (Robinul) are not commonly used for excessive sweating, because in order to work they often produce side effects like dry mouth, blurred vision, and urinary retention. Oral medication is typically reserved for people who have tried first-line treatments without success.

Botox and Excessive Sweating

Botulinum toxin A (Botox), a nerve toxin that can temporarily paralyze muscle, is often in the news as a cosmetic treatment for wrinkles. But it has actually been used in many areas of medicine for some time, such as in the treatment of muscle spasms and certain types of headaches. Its latest medical niche is the treatment of excessive underarm sweating.

A small amount of Botox is injected with a very fine needle into roughly 25 to 20 spots in each armpit. This may produce up to 14 months of relief from sweating. The injections are uncomfortable, but use of a very small injection needle makes them tolerable.

Now that this treatment has received FDA approval for hyperhidrosis, many health insurers are providing coverage for the injections and the Botox itself after other treatments have failed.

Currently, the FDA has not approved Botox for sweating of the palms and soles of the feet, though some physicians are administering it as an off-label use, reportedly with success. Palm injections cause more pain, requiring nerve blocks to numb the hands in order to make the injections comfortable. Skilled practitioners have used Botox for the head and face, as well.

miraDry and Lasers

Microwave energy

miraDry is a treatment that was FDA approved in 2011 for the treatment of excessive underarm sweating. It is a noninvasive treatment using electromagnetic energy that targets heat on sweat glands, destroying them. Local anesthesia is used and the skin is cooled during this hour-long procedure. It can be repeated 2-3 times for optimal effect.

miraDry and Lasers

Lasers can focus heat a narrow beam of heat to destroy underarm sweat glands and can be done faster with a faster recovery.

Surgery for Excessive Sweating
Thoracic sympathectomy is surgical interruption of the sympathetic nerves responsible for sweating. Sympathectomy is an operation intended to destroy part of the nerve supply to the sweat glands in the skin. The surgeon inserts a special endoscopic instrument into the chest between two ribs just below the armpit. Sympathectomy is both effective and risky. Even with newer endoscopic techniques, the complications can include excessive sweating in other parts of the body and lung and nerve problems. As many of these complications are serious and not reversible, this option is rarely used, and then only as a last resort.


Microwave energy

miraDry is a treatment that was FDA approved in 2011 for the treatment of excessive underarm sweating. It is a noninvasive treatment using electromagnetic energy that targets heat on sweat glands, destroying them. Local anesthesia is used and the skin is cooled during this hour-long procedure. It can be repeated 2-3 times for optimal effect.

Other than the above, considering that as far as I know, all martial arts teach defenses against a straight punch; too many people learn them for attacks. That would include the Hapkido I studied, and I would think all forms of Hapkido, since Hapkido provided multiple defenses for all types of attack. Including straight punches.

As alluded to above, why would you want to study a martial art that did not teach defense against such a common attack?

Just as not everyone can advance to higher levels in football or basketball, perhaps martial arts just isn't for you.
 

jobo

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Have seen a doctor? It seems there are some treatment successes. I am sure you can find other treatment suggestions. Luckily they seem to abound. I knew a guy in the mid-80s, in Korea, who could not find any solutions other than several showers a day, and that wasn't really very effective.



Other than the above, considering that as far as I know, all martial arts teach defenses against a straight punch; too many people learn them for attacks. That would include the Hapkido I studied, and I would think all forms of Hapkido, since Hapkido provided multiple defenses for all types of attack. Including straight punches.

As alluded to above, why would you want to study a martial art that did not teach defense against such a common attack?

Just as not everyone can advance to higher levels in football or basketball, perhaps martial arts just isn't for you.
you were doing well until your last line, which is dismissive at best.
the OP has two issues, one the sweating, that doesn't have to be an issued at all, unless an art puts him through a pointless endurance test, there is really no justification in any test of ma performance for a 7 hour test,

the other is his wonky eye sight,, that's only an issue if he is doing very a live fighting and cant wear his glasses, any art where head shots arnt allowed will suit him, including all the grappling arts,.
suggesting he should give it up, isn't really r the answer
 

DaveB

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I'd go with Judo, but, or wing chun Or tai chi.

Wing chun because some schools focus heavily on chi sau where one uses tactile sensitivity to fight in close. Taichi does the same through push hands and slow motion training should minimise sweat.

I'm curious though; why do you want a rank system?
 

oftheherd1

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you were doing well until your last line, which is dismissive at best.
the OP has two issues, one the sweating, that doesn't have to be an issued at all, unless an art puts him through a pointless endurance test, there is really no justification in any test of ma performance for a 7 hour test,

the other is his wonky eye sight,, that's only an issue if he is doing very a live fighting and cant wear his glasses, any art where head shots arnt allowed will suit him, including all the grappling arts,.
suggesting he should give it up, isn't really r the answer

Sorry it came across to you as simply dismissive, but thanks for pointing out it may have come across that way to others as well.

I was simply giving him what I thought was good (if brutal) advice. Think about it: problems with sweating, which should be treatable, desire for no defense against straight from the front punches, which is probably one of the most common punches, problems with control of one eye which again is treatable, and no long individual testing sessions, which is surely school dependent. Wanting belts should apply to most arts, and most should wish for strong punches and kicks, if used. I don't know an art like that. If any others do, please chime in and give reasons to the OP they would apply.

But the whole thing seems a little strange to me anyway. Nine months with Muay Thai, six months with Bujinkan Ninjutsu, and a year with Krav Maga, and he hasn't been able to ask any instructors nor fellow students these questions? Maybe it is just frustration on the OP's part, but I wonder.
 

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