Four parts of training...

geezer

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The other day I was talking with a friend who does a non-traditional mixed martial art that includes some Wing Chun concepts. He pointed out that they have three main aspects of training. Technique and drills, conditioning, and sparring. No-forms. No chi-sau... except some really basic stuff thrown in with their drills. Wing Chun on the other hand has at least four areas that we have to constantly train. Forms, techniques and drills, chi-sau, and sparring. And if you feel, as I do, that you also need separate conditioning including flexibility, strength, and cardio training, it's a handful. Especially when it's just a "hobby" that has to be balanced with work and family life.

I'm having a heck of a time keeping up on the different aspects of training these days. I feel like a juggler whose trying to keep too many things in the air at once. I seem to make progress in one area only to slide back in others. Sometimes I wonder if I've come about as far as my limited ability and time will allow in this art. Anybody else ever get this feeling?
 

Tensei85

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Hey Geezer,

Haha Im with you on that one, especially with Academics, Personal relationships & the occasional Frat party!

I've actually been seperating my training for instance Mon-Wed-Fri
I concentrate mainly on Conditioning; Cycling, Running, Cardio, Abs training etc...

Tue-Thu-Sat;
I do Forms, Drills, & Weighttraining.

That way I condense the hours of training, sure I would be probably getting more out of it if I did all thee above each day, but its important to give the muscles & equally the mind a break. So rest & recovery is also an important part of training. And I spar whenever the opportunity presents itself, try to atleast once or twice a Week...

But I understand your pain, good luck!
 

profesormental

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Train drills a lot and with intensity = cardio and strength.

There, now it's just three again.

Remember that auxiliary training for "cardio" and "strength" and such is for getting your attributes to another level which MUST be ingrained and implemented through drills.

If you're not going for sport, it is not really necessary for health. Your training and activity if done with intensity should be enough.

Most of my auxiliary training is done around the concept of usefulness towards a direct martial activity.

My time is very precious, so I work to use it as efficiently as possible.

I've been asked "What do you train so that you can spar for those 5 X 5 minute rounds?"

I say "I practice fighting drills for 10 X 2 minute rounds for a week or two, then go to 7 X 3 minute rounds for a few weeks then the 5 X 5 minute rounds. I just do it. No better cardio workout than just doing the dam things!"

I usually do the 10 X 2 or 7 X 3 because I can ram in drills/bag work plus sparring drills plus exercises, etc. Keeps people on their toes and alert.

If you think that won't get you in shape, then we have many participants use the "Bucket of Shame" that can speak to the contrary.

Yes, the Bucket of Shame is where we extract the shame, fear and weakness from your body in the form of puke. :)

Hope that helps.

Juan Mercado

The guy from the tropical Island that is about to get hit with a hurricane, that has witnessed the use of the Bucket of Shame many, may times...
 

mook jong man

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You can condense cardio and strength training into one session by using a kettlebell , its pretty intense , works on all the main muscle groups at once and doesn't take very long at all .

If I'm training solo I will get the kettlebell lifts out of the way first mixed in like a circuit with some ab work usually hanging leg raises.

That only takes about 15 mins and then I go onto whatever skills I'm working on at the time , then I do some power training on the wall bag , heavy bag , kicking etc.

After that I practice some leg raising , some stepping , some pivoting , then SLT, CK , BG forms and a bit of stretching.
The whole thing probably takes about an hour , and I would maybe do that twice a week.

The rest of the time when I'm teaching students I always try to make the last 20 mins of the lesson either some form of sparring or a mixture of power training and technique training done to a count for 15 repetitions each side.

Done at a decent pace this will tax all their energy systems and make them have to execute their techniques when operating under a very high level of fatigue , the only respite they get is when they're holding the pad or attacking their partner.
 

yak sao

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I turn 48 tomorrow. When I started MA I was 18 and I was all about being in the best physical shape I could be in.
But now my emphasis is changed.
I no longer have my 8 pack, but I don't obsess over it any more. I'm content with a lean waist and the resolve to NEVER get a gut as long as it is in my power.
I don't have the muscle defintion I had. But I'm content to hit the Total Gym every morning and supplememnt that with pullups and various pushups.
I Can't go for long rounds of spariing like I could in my 20's but I can still out last my to-dei and si-dei for the most part in chi sau and lat sau.....that's good enough.

My runs through the woods are replaced for the most part with hikes.
I let my forms training be the biggest part of my stretching and drill work the biggest part of my cardio.

No. I'm not in the best physical shape I could be in but I'm fit and I'm healthy.
That works for me.
 

wtxs

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I no longer have my 8 pack, but I don't obsess over it any more. I'm content with a lean waist and the resolve to NEVER get a gut as long as it is in my power.

I"m jealous big time. No matter how hard I've tried, the only place I can fit an 6 pack is in the cooler or the fridg.:lol:
 

KamonGuy2

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Wing chun without chi sao? Thats depressing....

Chi sao isnt the be all and end all of wing chun, but its still a part of it. Its like losing a limb without free flowing drills like chi sao (chi sao is the closest most chunners get to sparring)

Where does your friend do his wing chun Geezer?
 

matsu

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i feel this pain too my friend.
i do 50+ hours a week in my job i try to see my teen kids as much as poss i go to my club 3 nights per week min one and half hours per session and i try to go to the gym 3 times per week before work and i need to practise what i,m learning in the classes......oh and then theres SWMBO, who is increasingly demanding of my time lol....
i think its as we get to a certain age or time in our life then we should concentrate more on the journey vs the destination. a bit of a naff saying due to its being used so much but i am trying to do just that.
the little things i gain in everyday, the new technique the nod from sifu that says..."better" i,m sure i forget more than i learn but i just hope i,m getting better bit by bit.
matsu
 
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geezer

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Wing chun without chi sao? Thats depressing....

Chi sao isnt the be all and end all of wing chun, but its still a part of it. Its like losing a limb without free flowing drills like chi sao (chi sao is the closest most chunners get to sparring)

Where does your friend do his wing chun Geezer?

Actually, he is a former boxer and judo guy who was a student of mine for a while back when I was involved in the WT system in the 80's. We both also trained in Latosa PMAS Escrima. He left WT and continued to train Escrima with various instructors. He also refined his boxing and grappling and got into training MMA fighters locally. He's just got a gift for the martial arts and has continued to include some modified wing chun in his approach to fighting.

I would dismiss this approach as "just another chop suey mix" if it weren't for the fact that he's so damned good. And also because he's my friend and escrima coach. ...And also because I get tired of everybody running down everybody else.
 

KamonGuy2

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Actually, he is a former boxer and judo guy who was a student of mine for a while back when I was involved in the WT system in the 80's. We both also trained in Latosa PMAS Escrima. He left WT and continued to train Escrima with various instructors. He also refined his boxing and grappling and got into training MMA fighters locally. He's just got a gift for the martial arts and has continued to include some modified wing chun in his approach to fighting.

I would dismiss this approach as "just another chop suey mix" if it weren't for the fact that he's so damned good. And also because he's my friend and escrima coach. ...And also because I get tired of everybody running down everybody else.

Oh I see. I thought he was a 'pure wing chun' guy (only doing wing chun). I do feel that chi sao is a very useful tool to have in your arsenal (it gets you moving and gets you comfortable with contact), but I can see his methodology if he is coming from other martial art backgrounds
 

qwksilver61

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Sad....I am dealing with a group that seems to want "instant fu" skipping the fundamentals.....the " well grounded foundation",I guess that would make me a purist.I am a big fan of principle, and not "lets jump into Chi Sau",while ignoring our footwork and basic training, .....I know this stuff works,and I wouldn't want to give it away to some "hey that's cool show me quick types" build a solid foundation..then link every thing together...piece by piece.....then forget............and disconnect.(just don't disconnect while driving)
effective combat takes time to digest and is not fast food.I am not sorry for saying so,maybe I am driving with blinders on,maybe not.I like pure Wing Tzun that is all.I do know that EBMAS has adopted ground fighting into it's arsenal.I don't know what the future holds...maybe there is a fight team in the works....either from Sifu Gutierrez,or Sifu Emin? you tell me? I learn something new everyday......sometimes we adapt..sometimes we are steadfast..."nuff said"
 
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