Fitness certifications

Gerry Seymour

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Okay, this topic is tangential to MA, so I figured this was as good a place on MT as any...

I've considered picking up a fitness certification or two along the way. A few reasons for wanting one: better knowledge for helping students with fitness, improve some of what we do in in-class exercises, and maybe be able to offer an occasional class where certifications are required (and always preferred). Of course, it might even help with some marketing along the way some day.

I'm leaning toward kettlebell, because it's become my favorite strength training. There are plenty of places that will offer certification online, most of which are probably meaningless (except for marketing and satisfying the "you must have a certification" requirement). I'm looking for suggestions. Of course, like most folks, I'd prefer cheap and excellent, knowing those two rarely go together. More importantly, I'd like to not end up with expensive and worthless.

I'm mostly interested in strength focus, so would prefer certifications that lean that way. I'd prefer any that have online training, as well as the actual certification course. Any suggestions?
 

Andrew Green

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I'd probably go with a more general PT or Group Fitness instructor certification first, then get into specialized things like kettle bell.

I do agree that it's a good idea for MA instructors, a large chunk of our students come in for fitness as one of the primary reasons.

Most are online, or at least largely online and then a practical component over a weekend. You'll get a lot of material to go through and then take a exam at the end. A lot of it should be about how the body works, how muscle groups work together, how to prevent injuries when designing a plan, etc. Which is why I'd go with a general certification before getting into something that is meant to teach a specific program, learn the fundamentals first.
 

Flying Crane

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Have you ever looked at a local community college to see if they offer some kind of fitness trainer certification? That might include kettlebell skills, and might carry more weight and legitimacy as a certification.
 

jobo

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Okay, this topic is tangential to MA, so I figured this was as good a place on MT as any...

I've considered picking up a fitness certification or two along the way. A few reasons for wanting one: better knowledge for helping students with fitness, improve some of what we do in in-class exercises, and maybe be able to offer an occasional class where certifications are required (and always preferred). Of course, it might even help with some marketing along the way some day.

I'm leaning toward kettlebell, because it's become my favorite strength training. There are plenty of places that will offer certification online, most of which are probably meaningless (except for marketing and satisfying the "you must have a certification" requirement). I'm looking for suggestions. Of course, like most folks, I'd prefer cheap and excellent, knowing those two rarely go together. More importantly, I'd like to not end up with expensive and worthless.

I'm mostly interested in strength focus, so would prefer certifications that lean that way. I'd prefer any that have online training, as well as the actual certification course. Any suggestions?

you probably need to pin down what you are trying to do a bit more precisely, knowledge with out certification is easy to get, just read, certification with out a great deal of underpinning knowledge is relatively cheap and quick to obtain, go on a two day course in kettlebells,or what ever. certification that certified you have,a good deal of underpinning knowledge, are both very expensive and take a long time to achieve.

as a rule of thumb, if the certification has a," significant commercial value, its cost a significant amount if money and takes a,significant amount of time
 
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oftheherd1

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Okay, this topic is tangential to MA, so I figured this was as good a place on MT as any...

I've considered picking up a fitness certification or two along the way. A few reasons for wanting one: better knowledge for helping students with fitness, improve some of what we do in in-class exercises, and maybe be able to offer an occasional class where certifications are required (and always preferred). Of course, it might even help with some marketing along the way some day.

I'm leaning toward kettlebell, because it's become my favorite strength training. There are plenty of places that will offer certification online, most of which are probably meaningless (except for marketing and satisfying the "you must have a certification" requirement). I'm looking for suggestions. Of course, like most folks, I'd prefer cheap and excellent, knowing those two rarely go together. More importantly, I'd like to not end up with expensive and worthless.

I'm mostly interested in strength focus, so would prefer certifications that lean that way. I'd prefer any that have online training, as well as the actual certification course. Any suggestions?

As Andrew Green pointed out, many study martial arts to get fit. Do you have any experience in martial arts? :D :D

I think if you want it, try it somewhere and see if it makes you feel more worth while, or even just enjoy it a lot. But as an experienced martial arts practitioner and teacher, I think you probably have all the qualifications you need to train fitness within your martial art.

It might get you a few students who see your certification on the wall, or maybe be a sideline when MA business is slow. I could even see it having some value if a student over extends themselves and takes you to court. I don't think I would consider it, but I am not you. I would say if you want it, go for it. Maybe you could even talk your wife in to joining you.
 
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Gerry Seymour

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I'd probably go with a more general PT or Group Fitness instructor certification first, then get into specialized things like kettle bell.

I do agree that it's a good idea for MA instructors, a large chunk of our students come in for fitness as one of the primary reasons.

Most are online, or at least largely online and then a practical component over a weekend. You'll get a lot of material to go through and then take a exam at the end. A lot of it should be about how the body works, how muscle groups work together, how to prevent injuries when designing a plan, etc. Which is why I'd go with a general certification before getting into something that is meant to teach a specific program, learn the fundamentals first.
Any specific recommendations?
 
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Gerry Seymour

Gerry Seymour

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you probably need to pin down what you are trying to do a bit more precisely, knowledge with out certification is easy to get, just read, certification with out a great deal of underpinning knowledge is relatively cheap and quick to obtain, go on a two day course in kettlebells,or what ever. certification that certified you have,a good deal of underpinning knowledge, are both very expensive and take a long time to achieve.

as a rule of thumb, if the certification has a," significant commercial value, its cost a significant amount if money and takes a,significant amount of time
Agreed. I've got some of the most basic underlying knowledge already. I've studied informally with some folks along the way, because it suited my MA goals. I wouldn't mind updating that, but I'm more focused on picking up good material on kettlebell specifically.

The certification (the "paper") is mostly to suit requirements and maybe for future marketing. I don't really need it to be something people recognize, so I'm not looking to pay for the extra marketing oomph, but for the knowledge. For the knowledge, I'm happy with something that is focused on a narrow area (like kettlebell) to keep cost/time down. I'd prefer a wider coverage, but I'm unlikely to put out the time and money for that.
 
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Gerry Seymour

Gerry Seymour

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As Andrew Green pointed out, many study martial arts to get fit. Do you have any experience in martial arts? :D :D

I think if you want it, try it somewhere and see if it makes you feel more worth while, or even just enjoy it a lot. But as an experienced martial arts practitioner and teacher, I think you probably have all the qualifications you need to train fitness within your martial art.

It might get you a few students who see your certification on the wall, or maybe be a sideline when MA business is slow. I could even see it having some value if a student over extends themselves and takes you to court. I don't think I would consider it, but I am not you. I would say if you want it, go for it. Maybe you could even talk your wife in to joining you.
Smartass.

I'm actually thinking I'd offer classes from time to time (perhaps at the same rec center where I teach classes), and they require some sort of certification for liability reasons. And if I could talk them into leaving the kettlebells in the room, I'd incorporate them into MA class warm-ups.
 

oftheherd1

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Smartass.

I'm actually thinking I'd offer classes from time to time (perhaps at the same rec center where I teach classes), and they require some sort of certification for liability reasons. And if I could talk them into leaving the kettlebells in the room, I'd incorporate them into MA class warm-ups.

Nailed me on that one. :D

I am obviously out of touch. I would not have thought there would be a certification on promoting fitness on kettlebells alone. Perhaps I need to re-evaluate the value of use of and a certification in that. Good luck with your decision.
 

jks9199

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I'm personally very slowly and haphazardly looking into MoveNat and similar groups -- but that's because it matches my interests and desires.
 

JowGaWolf

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Okay, this topic is tangential to MA, so I figured this was as good a place on MT as any...

I've considered picking up a fitness certification or two along the way. A few reasons for wanting one: better knowledge for helping students with fitness, improve some of what we do in in-class exercises, and maybe be able to offer an occasional class where certifications are required (and always preferred). Of course, it might even help with some marketing along the way some day.

I'm leaning toward kettlebell, because it's become my favorite strength training. There are plenty of places that will offer certification online, most of which are probably meaningless (except for marketing and satisfying the "you must have a certification" requirement). I'm looking for suggestions. Of course, like most folks, I'd prefer cheap and excellent, knowing those two rarely go together. More importantly, I'd like to not end up with expensive and worthless.

I'm mostly interested in strength focus, so would prefer certifications that lean that way. I'd prefer any that have online training, as well as the actual certification course. Any suggestions?
Most people feel comfortable with the "certified fitness..." Not that it'll make much difference to traditional training methods but it will make a difference to those who want to feel comfortable with someone that's not going to be doing exercises that are destructive on the body. Crossfit is known for exercises that are horrible for joints and backs. Injuries are common.

If you are going to get a certification, get one that will allow you to get the most mileage and use from. Something that is nationally recognized.
 

Anarax

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Okay, this topic is tangential to MA, so I figured this was as good a place on MT as any...

I've considered picking up a fitness certification or two along the way. A few reasons for wanting one: better knowledge for helping students with fitness, improve some of what we do in in-class exercises, and maybe be able to offer an occasional class where certifications are required (and always preferred). Of course, it might even help with some marketing along the way some day.

I'm leaning toward kettlebell, because it's become my favorite strength training. There are plenty of places that will offer certification online, most of which are probably meaningless (except for marketing and satisfying the "you must have a certification" requirement). I'm looking for suggestions. Of course, like most folks, I'd prefer cheap and excellent, knowing those two rarely go together. More importantly, I'd like to not end up with expensive and worthless.

I'm mostly interested in strength focus, so would prefer certifications that lean that way. I'd prefer any that have online training, as well as the actual certification course. Any suggestions?

Could you expand on your definition of cheap? A strength band/resistance certificate I think would be a great from a martial artist perspective, though the kettlebell is a great one as well. Bands are easy on the joints, builds strength, ROM and can also be used therapeutically.

Whatever certificate you get, be sure to work "I'm a fitness instructor" into every conversation possible. Regardless of how irrelevant and uninterested people seem. That's the only consistent behavior I've found with Fitness Instructors.
 

JowGaWolf

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Could you expand on your definition of cheap? A strength band/resistance certificate I think would be a great from a martial artist perspective, though the kettlebell is a great one as well. Bands are easy on the joints, builds strength, ROM and can also be used therapeutically.

Whatever certificate you get, be sure to work "I'm a fitness instructor" into every conversation possible. Regardless of how irrelevant and uninterested people seem. That's the only consistent behavior I've found with Fitness Instructors.
I've never seen anyone to ask for proof of certification after asking. I just know people look for it. Sort of like the minimum that people expect.
 

Anarax

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I've never seen anyone to ask for proof of certification after asking. I just know people look for it. Sort of like the minimum that people expect.

The working it into the conversation comment was a joke. Ever met a Vegan, Crossfitter or Marathon Runner? You would definitely know if they were within the first minute of talking to them?
 
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Gerry Seymour

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Gerry Seymour

Gerry Seymour

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I'm personally very slowly and haphazardly looking into MoveNat and similar groups -- but that's because it matches my interests and desires.
"Slowly and haphazardly" is a good description of my search, as well.
 

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