english or japanese/chinese?

rachel

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When you learn a new self defense technique or a form does your instructor refer to it in English or Chinese/Japanese language?
 
english, we do use a couple of terms from Japanese: gi, kiai, umm.... hmmmm..... oh, and kenpo. Thats about it.

Lamont
 
There are lots of other kinds of "Kenpo" and "Kempo", but for the most part you'll find students of American Kenpo Karate here; the brain child of the late Senior GrandMaster Ed K. Parker. Mr. Parker, in devising/arranging the system wanted it to be an "American" martial art... thus it's terms are predominantly English. ((Which for the time being is STILL the official language of America))
So for the most part the terms/commands...etc. that youll hear in our schools will be English. It's good to know a good dose of the terms in other languages so that if you visit another martial arts school (Kwoon/Dojang/Dojo...etc) you can be a polite guest. True we do use a few oriental terms, but most of those are carry-overs from those who first studied oriental martial arts systems.

Your Brother
John
 
I first started in a Japanese Kenpo school.. everything was in Japanese.. it was a Dojo.. we counted in Japanese.. did the Sensei thing etc.. It was a tough transition to Ed Parker's American Kenpo.. but it's getting easier by the day.. *S*

now we are all American :)

Tess
 
:D

I am so glad that most of the names which is used in american Kenpo are in fact English. It would have been hell trying to learn a third language.

:cool:
 
If it's a Kenpo technique, the names are English. If it's Karate then Japanese. My instructor speaks Italian, Spanish, English in that order. He learned Shotokan as a child before coming to America and learning English, so the stances, strikes etc. are frequently called out in Japanese. Plus there are many in my class who have English second, so if he's instructing personally he will switch langages as he goes through the class.
 
Conducted mostly in Korean. Some mix in Hapkido, but in Taekwondo all the kicks are called out in Korean, etc. Most personal instruction, though, is obviously in English, but most names, numbers, techniques, etc, are in Korean.

At every other school I've been to or studied at, it was largely English with maybe some memorization of random terms, like Wing Chun blocks, etc. Otherwise, English. The acception is that Judo schools always conduct it in Japanese (especially techniques) which I think is awesome. Breaking away from English is great sometimes.

I did get the chance to instruct someone in French once, though. That was pretty fun! :D
 
Originally posted by bahenlaura
I'm so glad that the names which are used in "American Kenpo" are in fact English. It would have been hell trying to learn a third language.

Unless you are living in another non-English speaking country.... it's English. If you are in Spain then Spanish should be the language of choice or if in France, then French.

Many "Traditional" systems seem to feel that the language is of some importance...... But I agree with Mr. Parker...... since when does talking in Japanese, Korean, Chinese, Spanish, French, Dutch, (if you are in America and speak English) make you a better martial Artist!!......... IT DOESN'T. So speak the language of the country you are in and learn the real names of the moves and spend time improving the movement not learning another language.

:asian:
 
Originally posted by Goldendragon7
Unless you are living in another non-English speaking country.... it's English. If you are in Spain then Spanish should be the language of choice or if in France, then French.

Many "Traditional" systems seem to feel that the language is of some importance...... But I agree with Mr. Parker...... since when does talking in Japanese, Korean, Chinese, Spanish, French, Dutch, (if you are in America and speak English) make you a better martial Artist!!......... IT DOESN'T. So speak the language of the country you are in and learn the real names of the moves and spend time improving the movement not learning another language.

:asian:

Amen to that! I think the main reason traditional systems feel that language is so important is to recognize the, uh.....tradition of it all. You know, keep everyone mindful of the system's roots. Well, we can learn and appreciate the history of kenpo without learning another language. Trying to incorporate one isn't at all necessary.
 
I know this doesn't neccesarly apply to EPAK, but I'm glad I learn Jappenese in my Judo class. It's the international language of Judo. I can go to Germany, France, Russia, or Belgium and Ippon Seionage is still Ippon Seionage, not "One Arm Shoulder Throw" or whatever it is in German, French, Russian. or Belgish (?) When dealing in an international community, a common language is vital for understanding. I enjoy the fact I can train almost anywhere on the globe, and names I learn now should get me through OK. Okay, I'm done.
 
Correct me if I'm wrong, but don't Belgians speak French?

However, I agree. If the techniques are kept in one language (like Judo/Yudo do really well), it makes training more easily universal. It's not exactly like I'm going to go to France to train in my chosen art, but it would be nice to do it while I travel without having to necessarily learn the countries' spoken language.

Besides that, I think it's beneficial (again though, not necessary) to memorize the terms in the other language because it's a practicer in memorization. The move should be the emphasis, obviously, but anything that you force yourself to remember will only help strengthen your ability to retain information, which in all martial arts is definitely necessary.
 

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