Dojang Etiquette

TrueJim

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Speaking of kids with cameras...

We started a "YouTube Club" in our summer camp. Kids making their own taekwondo videos, with parents volunteering to coach the club. We posted this video to Facebook last week and it was shared widely by a lot of schools.

 
I liked that. What does the boy say at 4:00 though - "Chamber and ____"?
 
Yah, we say that a lot in our school: chamber...and...POP!
 
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Cute for adults to watch, and probably easier for kids to digest than something I'd make.
 
It looks like you have a great group of kids.

One thing in the video caught my attention. During the example of how not to dress, I noticed right away that Jacob had a visible logo on his t-shirt and thought, that should be plain white. However, in the correction, David said "He's wearing a t-shirt..." Wait, what? You're not allowed to wear a t-shirt at all? I don't think I've ever worn my dobok without a moisture-wicking t-shirt under it.
 
Here's what our KJN's preference is: girls may of course wear a tank or tee under their dobok that's color-coordinated with the dobok, boys generally wear no tank or tee under their dobok. He's really not as concerned about what the "rule" is as he is about "looking sharp". So a boy with a white dobok and a solid white tee underneath -- he's not going to freak out on them or anything.

Like, on hot summer days you're allowed to wear your dobok slacks with tee, but the tee has to be either (a) a dojang tee, or (b) a tee from a tournament that you attended; and (c) he prefers that everything be clean and wrinkle free. So as long as you "look sharp" he's happy.

What he doesn't like (do any of us like this?) is when you show up with things like wrinkled mismatched outfits, as if no effort was made to look sharp. And even then, it's not that he views this as an egregious sign of disrespect to the dojang: he's just trying to help teach kids to mind their grooming.
 
Here's what our KJN's preference is: girls may of course wear a tank or tee under their dobok that's color-coordinated with the dobok, boys generally wear no tank or tee under their dobok. He's really not as concerned about what the "rule" is as he is about "looking sharp". So a boy with a white dobok and a solid white tee underneath -- he's not going to freak out on them or anything.
Interesting. Our rule is that the t-shirt is optional. If you wear one, it should be either white, black, or your belt color.
Like, on hot summer days you're allowed to wear your dobok slacks with tee, but the tee has to be either (a) a dojang tee, or (b) a tee from a tournament that you attended; and (c) he prefers that everything be clean and wrinkle free. So as long as you "look sharp" he's happy.
I wish we could do that, but we must wear the dobok top at all times.

Something in your video that made me a little jealous was watching them fill water bottles and putting it "where you can get to it easily." My KJN does not allow water breaks during class. Not healthy, I know, but he is kind of old-school.
 
It looks like you have a great group of kids.

One thing in the video caught my attention. During the example of how not to dress, I noticed right away that Jacob had a visible logo on his t-shirt and thought, that should be plain white. However, in the correction, David said "He's wearing a t-shirt..." Wait, what? You're not allowed to wear a t-shirt at all? I don't think I've ever worn my dobok without a moisture-wicking t-shirt under it.
I'm not sure most of my early instructors would have allowed a t-shirt, except for female students. Most don't care these days. I request they wear one that matches the dogi (so, black, in our school), but I know at least one instructor who doesn't care, at all, and often wears a t-shirt with printing on it, which shows partially.
 
I ALWAYS wear a white t shirt under the dobok top. I don't want to be one of the guys with yellow armpit stains.
 
My KJN does not allow water breaks during class. Not healthy, I know, but he is kind of old-school.
For most schools, I don't think the workout is long enough or intense enough for a lack of water to be a health issue.

I recall thinking that the water craze was out of hand when I saw a young woman with her water bottle in church. It's standing and sitting for an hour. You don't need water! :)
 
For most schools, I don't think the workout is long enough or intense enough for a lack of water to be a health issue.

I recall thinking that the water craze was out of hand when I saw a young woman with her water bottle in church. It's standing and sitting for an hour. You don't need water! :)
Some folks actually do. I have a step-sister-in-law who has a medical condition where she no longer produces saliva. She literally must have water with her at all times, according to her doctor. I think he told her she should be sipping at least every 5 minutes.

As for water in training, it depends how you look at it. If they hydrated reasonably the rest of the day, an hour of hard exercise and sweating can actually be a problem. If they didn't hydrate enough during the day - perhaps they work in the heat and didn't stay ahead of the fluid loss, it can become a problem with less intensity or a shorter period. That may or may not be a serious issue, depending on other factors, so why not get them hydrated. Now, add to that the fact that muscles cramp more easily under even mild dehydration, which can compromise performance, and that this seems to get worse as we (okay, me, anyway) age.

Might as well have students drinking water, as long as it isn't interfering with class. I'd rather them have a water bottle handy than have to step away to get to a fountain or something.
 
I'm not sure most of my early instructors would have allowed a t-shirt, except for female students. Most don't care these days. I request they wear one that matches the dogi (so, black, in our school), but I know at least one instructor who doesn't care, at all, and often wears a t-shirt with printing on it, which shows partially.

Deadpool rashguard. And this Gi.

14089307_842221592576506_8795695094328161482_n.jpg
 
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Interesting. Our rule is that the t-shirt is optional. If you wear one, it should be either white, black, or your belt color.

I wish we could do that, but we must wear the dobok top at all times.

Something in your video that made me a little jealous was watching them fill water bottles and putting it "where you can get to it easily." My KJN does not allow water breaks during class. Not healthy, I know, but he is kind of old-school.

I disagree. Most. kids classes are an hour long and there won't be any adverse consequences if they don't drink for an hour. A lot of kids use it as an excuse for a break.
 
Some folks actually do. I have a step-sister-in-law who has a medical condition where she no longer produces saliva. She literally must have water with her at all times, according to her doctor. I think he told her she should be sipping at least every 5 minutes.

.

We all need to accommodate unique medical conditions. Instructors should be made aware of such conditions. The fact that such a unique condition may eist is not a basis for a general policy. It would be like saying we must use sign language with verbal commands to teach every class.
 
We all need to accommodate unique medical conditions. Instructors should be made aware of such conditions. The fact that such a unique condition may eist is not a basis for a general policy. It would be like saying we must use sign language with verbal commands to teach every class.
That part of the post was a reply to the comment about the woman in church: "You don't need water!"
 
A lot of kids use it as an excuse for a break...

I agree. Normally there is no water-break mid-class, except on sparring days. On sparring days, they get a water break. But yah...any excuse for a break!
 

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