Discussion on time

oftheherd1

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That sounds like what NGA would call "applications", but with the formality of what we'd call "classical techniques" (our short forms). Seems like a similar approach, overall, except the organization by belt (NGA's doesn't have a similar clear cut delineation).

It might be worth adding that some associations choose to teach Hapkido by using forms just as TKD and others do. The Korean Hapkido Federation toyed with that idea back in the late mid-80s. My GM had us try some forms based on elbow strikes, and decided against their use. Ultimately the Federation scraped the idea.
 
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Choosing how to structure his teaching is entirely your master's right to choose. I am happy to have learned a lot of punch defenses; more tools in my tool box.

Does your master not teach kick defense for the same reason? No insult intended by that question, just curious. As I said, how your master chooses to structure his teaching is his decision for his own reasons.

Punch defense is orange belt, kick defense is blue belt.

We teach defense against strikes, but not the strikes themselves. But most of us aren't lacking in striking. The majority of the class is at least 2nd degree in TKD.
 

oftheherd1

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Sorry. I did read your post on what was done at different belts, but somehow didn't put it all together. I guess I just figured not teaching striking meant not teaching strike defense. Actuallty, in the Hapkido I learned we weren't specifically taught striking either. We were taught strike, and kick defense, and would practice kicks, with emphasis on kicking (against focus pads) with strength and in the sequence given by the GM. Lots of fun. Interesting thinking back on it that we weren't taught kicks on a daily other than during our warmups, and corrections given if they weren't done right. But doing them later in the class wasn't our way. We must have had 15 or 20 kicks we practiced during warmups. All were ones we would use in later techniques somewhere along the line.
 

oftheherd1

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We call them "techniques", but other people may consider them "short forms". There's 27 at white belt and anywhere from 4-9 new ones at each belt level. There's a general situation per belt level (up to Red Belt):
  • White belts deal with various grabs from the front
  • Yellow belts grabs from behind
  • Purple belts grabs while kneeling down
  • Orange belt does punch defense
  • Green belt attacks the other person
  • Blue belt does kick defense
For the white belt techniques, there are a mix of grabs (mostly straight wrist grabs, cross wrist grabs, or grabbing both wrists or both hands grabbing one wrist). Most of the techniques use either a Figure-4 lock, a Z-Lock, a V-Lock, or a shoulder lock for the take-down, although sometimes these present in different ways. For example, #14 and #16 are both V-Locks, but one is achieved by twisting the hand, while the other is achieved by securing the wrist and then using a knife-hand to push their hand away from the wrist. Sometimes we make them tap out while they're standing, but for the other 20, there's only 7 different submissions we use at the white belt level.

So it becomes a mix n match. #16 and #17 are essentially the same, except one is a double grab and one is single. #11 and #12 are also similar, but #11 being a double grab there's a bigger motion in the setup to break the grip, where #12 is a quicker motion because it's only a single hand. #14 and #16 are different ways of achieving a V-Lock, but both use the same submission after the throw.

I'm sure I must know those defenses, but can't visualize in my mind by those names. Could you give a short explanation? Thanks.
 
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I'm sure I must know those defenses, but can't visualize in my mind by those names. Could you give a short explanation? Thanks.

From this thread:
Wrist Lock Names (With Pictures)

Z-Lock is #1, their arm makes a Z.
V-Lock is #2, their arm makes a V.
Figure-4 is #3, your arm makes a 4 shape.
Shoulder Lock in this context is #4, where their arm is wrapped up by their ear.
 
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