Curious about the differences in judo\jjj and bjj.

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Ohnooze

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So I'm looking to start training and to be honest I'm not overly fond of bjj and it's popularity. That's not to say anything about it's effectiveness at all but I'm just not all that interested really.

I trained in judo as a child and jjj as a teen at the Houston Budokan and would like to continue now...even though I'm a lot older (48).

I have to be honest though, as uninterested as I am in bjj I don't want to miss out on good technique either. As I remember it judo had a lot of ground work and it looks very similar to bjj in some ways. So I guess my question would be...is there really that much difference between the two and will I be missing things that would give a bjj practitioner the upper hand?

Thanks for any feedback.
 

Dark Sovereign 193

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So I'm looking to start training and to be honest I'm not overly fond of bjj and it's popularity. That's not to say anything about it's effectiveness at all but I'm just not all that interested really.

I trained in judo as a child and jjj as a teen at the Houston Budokan and would like to continue now...even though I'm a lot older (48).

I have to be honest though, as uninterested as I am in bjj I don't want to miss out on good technique either. As I remember it judo had a lot of ground work and it looks very similar to bjj in some ways. So I guess my question would be...is there really that much difference between the two and will I be missing things that would give a bjj practitioner the upper hand?

Thanks for any feedback.
Honestly I'm not the biggest fan of BJJ either. I don't practice any art of JJ, but I can tell you that BJJ and JJJ are both like religions. JJJ is like the Christian religion, and BJJ is like the Muslims. The Muslims were formed off of the wrongs of the Christians and what they thought they could improve. Muslism might be better for you if you have different ideals then the Christians; it's partly the same with Martial Arts.
 

Dark Sovereign 193

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I trained in judo as a child and jjj as a teen at the Houston Budokan and would like to continue now...even though I'm a lot older (48).
Thanks for any feedback.
Do you think your body can handle the pressure of wrestling with a bunch of "youths"? I would go to a few lessons (which isn't possible due to corona) and see how it is. I wouldn't recommend practicing moves on your own because if you decided to quit those moves could become useless
 
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Ohnooze

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Honestly I'm not the biggest fan of BJJ either. I don't practice any art of JJ, but I can tell you that BJJ and JJJ are both like religions. JJJ is like the Christian religion, and BJJ is like the Muslims. The Muslims were formed off of the wrongs of the Christians and what they thought they could improve. Muslism might be better for you if you have different ideals then the Christians; it's partly the same with Martial Arts.
lol...that is an interesting analogy.
 

Flying Crane

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It is easy to get the “grass is greener” syndrome. I suggest that when training is safe, you get involved with something that you find interesting and enjoyable, and don’t worry about what others are doing. You can spend your life chasing after what others are doing, and miss the excellent training that you ought to have been doing all along.
 

gpseymour

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So I'm looking to start training and to be honest I'm not overly fond of bjj and it's popularity. That's not to say anything about it's effectiveness at all but I'm just not all that interested really.

I trained in judo as a child and jjj as a teen at the Houston Budokan and would like to continue now...even though I'm a lot older (48).

I have to be honest though, as uninterested as I am in bjj I don't want to miss out on good technique either. As I remember it judo had a lot of ground work and it looks very similar to bjj in some ways. So I guess my question would be...is there really that much difference between the two and will I be missing things that would give a bjj practitioner the upper hand?

Thanks for any feedback.
The Judo I learned had a lot of groundwork. From what I hear, that’s pretty rare now, because of changes to competition rules. Most BJJ doesn’t spend a lot of time on standing work, so you could think of the midpoints of the arts as being mostly standing grappling (Judo) and mostly groundwork (BJJ). Of course, there can be a lot of variations between individual programs, so you ought to check out places near you.

As for JJJ, that’s a pretty broad term. It could look a lot like Judo (any of the variants), could look a bit like BJJ (more like early BJJ, as the principles and basic techniques are usually there), or could look more like an abrupt version of Aikido. Or a number of other possible variations.
 

Buka

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So I'm looking to start training and to be honest I'm not overly fond of bjj and it's popularity. That's not to say anything about it's effectiveness at all but I'm just not all that interested really.

I trained in judo as a child and jjj as a teen at the Houston Budokan and would like to continue now...even though I'm a lot older (48).

I have to be honest though, as uninterested as I am in bjj I don't want to miss out on good technique either. As I remember it judo had a lot of ground work and it looks very similar to bjj in some ways. So I guess my question would be...is there really that much difference between the two and will I be missing things that would give a bjj practitioner the upper hand?

Thanks for any feedback.

Welcome to Martial Talk, Ohnooze. :)

JJJ and BJJ are similar in that they are both Martial Arts. After that, not so much.

Best to visit dojos within a reasonable distance to you, join the one you like and go have fun.
 

Kung Fu Wang

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is there really that much difference between the two and will I be missing things that would give a bjj practitioner the upper hand?
If you

1. only care about the ground work, you don't need to train throwing skill.
2. don't care about remain standing, you don't need to train how to counter a throw.
3. don't care about your balance, you don't need to train strong rooting,.

Without doing 1, 2, 3, you can save a lot of training time. If you just concentrate your training on the ground game, of course, your ground game can be better than others.

The day that "pull guard" is allowed to be used in sport, the day that the throwing art is dying.

In the future, nobody will train this any more.

leg-lift.gif

Chang-leg-lift.jpg
 
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jobo

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So I'm looking to start training and to be honest I'm not overly fond of bjj and it's popularity. That's not to say anything about it's effectiveness at all but I'm just not all that interested really.

I trained in judo as a child and jjj as a teen at the Houston Budokan and would like to continue now...even though I'm a lot older (48).

I have to be honest though, as uninterested as I am in bjj I don't want to miss out on good technique either. As I remember it judo had a lot of ground work and it looks very similar to bjj in some ways. So I guess my question would be...is there really that much difference between the two and will I be missing things that would give a bjj practitioner the upper hand?

Thanks for any feedback.
what is it you want to achieve?

training for comps is generaly better than training for belts, if you want to be more than averagely proficient

but as soon as you do that you are limiting yourself to the rule set your training, youl get very good at what you train, and not at all at " good "techniques that are not applicable

you can send your self mad trying to fill all the holes that appear as soon as you say " but what if"
 

drop bear

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what is it you want to achieve?

training for comps is generaly better than training for belts, if you want to be more than averagely proficient

but as soon as you do that you are limiting yourself to the rule set your training, youl get very good at what you train, and not at all at " good "techniques that are not applicable

you can send your self mad trying to fill all the holes that appear as soon as you say " but what if"

Do multiple competitions with different rule sets.
 

drop bear

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well yea if you have an infinete amount of time free, most people strugle to do one justice

One style, multiple competitions. If you are well rounded then you can play around with different rule sets.
 

wab25

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Honestly I'm not the biggest fan of BJJ either. I don't practice any art of JJ, but I can tell you that BJJ and JJJ are both like religions. JJJ is like the Christian religion, and BJJ is like the Muslims. The Muslims were formed off of the wrongs of the Christians and what they thought they could improve. Muslism might be better for you if you have different ideals then the Christians; it's partly the same with Martial Arts.
This has not been my experience at all. I come from the JJJ side... but BJJ folks have always welcomed me in and trained with me. The two arts have a lot in common... but focus in different areas. They are however, very complimentary to each other. If anything, I have found some JJJ guys to be a little resistant to BJJ techniques... But, once they get a little more experience... they realize that BJJ offers a lot that can help their JJJ be a bit better. Conversely, BJJ guys have always been very accepting of JJJ technique.

I have had many times when I tried a JJJ technique while rolling with BJJ and had it fail miserably. Afterwards, they would ask me what I was trying to do. We would discuss, and they would usually attempt to help me figure out how to make it work. The biggest missing piece has never been the technique itself, but in my application of the technique.

If you can check your ego at the door, JJJ and BJJ get along just fine...
 

Kung Fu Wang

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well yea if you have an infinete amount of time free, most people strugle to do one justice
Even with the same training partner, you can do:

- punch only.
- kick only.
- kick and punch only.
- wrestling only.
- ground game only.
- wrestling and ground game only.
- ...
 
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Ohnooze

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This has not been my experience at all. I come from the JJJ side... but BJJ folks have always welcomed me in and trained with me. The two arts have a lot in common... but focus in different areas. They are however, very complimentary to each other. If anything, I have found some JJJ guys to be a little resistant to BJJ techniques... But, once they get a little more experience... they realize that BJJ offers a lot that can help their JJJ be a bit better. Conversely, BJJ guys have always been very accepting of JJJ technique.

I have had many times when I tried a JJJ technique while rolling with BJJ and had it fail miserably. Afterwards, they would ask me what I was trying to do. We would discuss, and they would usually attempt to help me figure out how to make it work. The biggest missing piece has never been the technique itself, but in my application of the technique.

If you can check your ego at the door, JJJ and BJJ get along just fine...
I respect BJJ as a martial art. I think it's very much proven that given the right circumstances it's very effective. My only issue is that it's become so overly popular. And I have seen a lot of disrespect from the MMA \ BJJ people towards other arts. It's this kind of cocky attitude that nothing else really works. I don't think it's the majority of the people who practice it but I have seen a good bit of it in recent years. Don't get me wrong I see that a lot of schools don't train for real life so I understand where that view comes from.
In general I have more interest in the Japanese arts but I was curious how similar they were.
 

drop bear

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This has not been my experience at all. I come from the JJJ side... but BJJ folks have always welcomed me in and trained with me. The two arts have a lot in common... but focus in different areas. They are however, very complimentary to each other. If anything, I have found some JJJ guys to be a little resistant to BJJ techniques... But, once they get a little more experience... they realize that BJJ offers a lot that can help their JJJ be a bit better. Conversely, BJJ guys have always been very accepting of JJJ technique.

I have had many times when I tried a JJJ technique while rolling with BJJ and had it fail miserably. Afterwards, they would ask me what I was trying to do. We would discuss, and they would usually attempt to help me figure out how to make it work. The biggest missing piece has never been the technique itself, but in my application of the technique.

If you can check your ego at the door, JJJ and BJJ get along just fine...

Well honestly so can Christians and Muslims.
 

drop bear

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I respect BJJ as a martial art. I think it's very much proven that given the right circumstances it's very effective. My only issue is that it's become so overly popular. And I have seen a lot of disrespect from the MMA \ BJJ people towards other arts. It's this kind of cocky attitude that nothing else really works. I don't think it's the majority of the people who practice it but I have seen a good bit of it in recent years. Don't get me wrong I see that a lot of schools don't train for real life so I understand where that view comes from.
In general I have more interest in the Japanese arts but I was curious how similar they were.

The other thing you will get is Japanese but not really Japanese jujitsu that is a sort of judo, jujitsu hybrid thing.

That the real jjj guys will thumb their noses at.

Which is ironic because the not really Japanese stuff can quite often turn out better quality martial artists.
 
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