cross training

ralphmcpherson

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What do your GM's and instructors think of cross training? Do they encourage it or would they take offence to you seeking out new/different martial arts? I know many old school GM's do not like the idea and say the best way to gain knowlege is to "dig one hole" as "man who digs many holes will not find water, whereas man who digs one hole will find water" (or something like that). Basically, is it encouraged or discouraged where you train?
 

andyjeffries

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My master and grandmaster are both accepting/happy for me to cross train in Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu. I don't think either of them fully appreciate the value of it, but they will when there comes a time when the knowledge becomes applicable.

I think part of the reason for their happiness is that BJJ doesn't conflict with Taekwondo. I think if I was doing Karate or Kickboxing on the side then it would adjust how I do Taekwondo (negatively) and they'd have a problem.
 
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ralphmcpherson

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My current instructor ( a very good 7th dan), prides himself on having most bases covered when it comes to fighting, except a good ground game. So I think if I went and did something similar like karate or kickboxing he would probably feel that I think he is lacking in an area and may not be happy about it and also worry if what I am taught there may conflict with my tkd. He would probably ask me where I think Im lacking and offer to work on those areas with me. If I wanted to do bjj for the ground I dont think he would care.
 

StudentCarl

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My master crosstrains in hapkido and BJJ, so he's not opposed. We do some hapkido mixed in SD training, but I don't intend to truly crosstrain until I have 1st dan in TKD, as I think it's important to really focus on the fundamentals of one art at a time to imprint it well.

Carl
 

terryl965

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Well I personally believe init, but and their is always a but I also people need to have a solid base from there original art first.All my previous instructor always told us to go out and explore different arts and see what will and would not work for you.
 

Manny

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What do your GM's and instructors think of cross training? Do they encourage it or would they take offence to you seeking out new/different martial arts? I know many old school GM's do not like the idea and say the best way to gain knowlege is to "dig one hole" as "man who digs many holes will not find water, whereas man who digs one hole will find water" (or something like that). Basically, is it encouraged or discouraged where you train?

I did crosstraining with kenpo karate for almost a year without notifying nothing to my TKD sambonim, why? because of you have wrotte above. I think my sambonim would be angry he knows I am learning training elsewere something I can have in his dojang. Wy I did crosstraining? very simple, In my dojang the self defense aspect is almost inexistent, I talked several times with my sambonim asking him more self defense clases or maybe some self defense classes but he always answer me .... latter!!! and I got desilucionate of this because the dojang where I train is Olimpic/WTF oriented.

Manny
 

dancingalone

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Well I personally believe init, but and their is always a but I also people need to have a solid base from there original art first.All my previous instructor always told us to go out and explore different arts and see what will and would not work for you.

I would only add that arguably what is taught today as TKD is not the full array of techniques that the TKD pioneers practiced themselves although they may have walled off the body of knowledge through the tae kwon do/tae soo do/tang soo do and judo/yudo descriptors.

So to discover and learn the full range of what TKD should be, you might have to cross train.
 

Manny

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Funny thing but back in the 70's my sambonim was maroon belt in Nipon Kenpo, his teacher was the introductor of this MA in my country (a japanese), my sambonim told me he discovered Korean Karate (that was the mane of TKD in those days) and tried (crosstraining) and liked so he learned TKD without tell to his Nipon kenpo sensei because of the repercusion of this.

Some day sambonim told his japanese master about leaving Nipon Kenpo because he liked more TKD and he tahnked gratefully to his sensei: What my sambonim got was a very bad and angry reprimand and aalmost a broken knee that took several months to heal.

Manny
 

Manny

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Something I want to add, crosstraining is a good thing as longs as the person who want it has minimum a 1st degree black belt on his/her primary MA.

I want to know how many of you doing crosstraining leave behind main martail art completely? Myself... I am still doing TKD and I am still thinking TKD is a nice MA but also know I can benefit from learning other MA, however I have no intention to leave my dojang, my sambonim or my TKD.

Manny
 

dancingalone

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I want to know how many of you doing crosstraining leave behind main martail art completely?

Decades ago I was doing TKD and supplementing it with some boxing lessons on the side. I eventually left both and tried a bunch of different arts like Kuk Sool Won, pagua, chaquan, several types of tai chi chuan, etc. I eventually settled on Goju-ryu karate and later branched into aikido also.

I think each of the training experiences have been valuable, if only to help me think beyond the mundane details of what I train daily in. Seeing why each art performs a specific technique their way helps you better understand the advantages of your own method. And it gives you priceless perspective if you're a teacher, too.
 

Gorilla

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It has been my experience that cross training is discouraged!!!! It has been my experience that it is very valuable!!! My Kids train in TKD and Shotokan Karate....The Shotokan Sensei loves the Idea of Cross training the TKD world is not a fan!!!!
 

IcemanSK

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I think crosstraining is a great thing. I think it's a great way to not only close gaps in training, but also to get a different perspective.

Nearly 20 years ago, I began Western boxing because (as a TKD guy) my hands needed work). I realize that's not every TKD person's experience, but it was mine. I remember my 1st class & walking out of the gym with arms as sore as my legs were on my 1st day of TKD. Boxing taught me that when you focus really hard on only a few techniques, you can learn them very well, very quickly.

Several years ago, I struck up a friendship with a 7th Dan in Karate. When he found out I was a TKD guy, he said, "will you please come teach my students how to kick. I'm great with my hands, but I need someone who can teach them how to kick." So, I trained with them & worked on their kicks.

I know what my experience is & I know where I lack skills. I have limited use of my right hand. I can teach some of the principles of joint locks, but I'm limited as to what I can demonstrate to teach. That's where I encourage my students to cross train. When I know someone has an ability that I don't & can teach it to them. I shouldn't be afraid that my students will leave because of this.
 

Gemini

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My instructor believes that a person could spend a lifetime in our art and not perfect all aspects of it. Moving on to something else before mastering the techniques you've already been taught makes no sense. Which is better, to be great at one thing or mediocre at many?

A major part of our training is predicated on us controlling a given situation through superiority in technique. He who imposes his technique on the other will win. Keep the situation revolving around your strengths, not your adversaries strengths. Train harder. Perfect what you've been taught. Quantity is not key, quality is.

I tend to agree with him.
 
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ralphmcpherson

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My instructor believes that a person could spend a lifetime in our art and not perfect all aspects of it. Moving on to something else before mastering the techniques you've already been taught makes no sense. Which is better, to be great at one thing or mediocre at many?

A major part of our training is predicated on us controlling a given situation through superiority in technique. He who imposes his technique on the other will win. Keep the situation revolving around your strengths, not your adversaries strengths. Train harder. Perfect what you've been taught. Quantity is not key, quality is.

I tend to agree with him.
I have to agree with all that you have said. I have met many martial artists who are "a jack of all trades, master of none" and they would have been better off concentrating on one art and trying to perfect it. I am also a believer that fighting is about controlling the situation so the altercation is geared towards your strengths, this is why I dont believe one art is better than another, but one fighter will be better than the other. Personally, I would rather be exceptional at one martial art than "pretty good" at 5 martial arts, but thats just me and I assume thats the thinking behind some GM's not liking cross training.
 

Gorilla

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I have to agree with all that you have said. I have met many martial artists who are "a jack of all trades, master of none" and they would have been better off concentrating on one art and trying to perfect it. I am also a believer that fighting is about controlling the situation so the altercation is geared towards your strengths, this is why I dont believe one art is better than another, but one fighter will be better than the other. Personally, I would rather be exceptional at one martial art than "pretty good" at 5 martial arts, but thats just me and I assume thats the thinking behind some GM's not liking cross training.

We train in Shotokan because it is an add to our Tkd. For most this does not work! It takes commitment and an understanding of what you are trying to accomplish! One art must add to the next. We are doing it because it gives a different look to our TKD fighting (an Edge).
 

dancingalone

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We train in Shotokan because it is an add to our Tkd. For most this does not work! It takes commitment and an understanding of what you are trying to accomplish! One art must add to the next. We are doing it because it gives a different look to our TKD fighting (an Edge).

Absolutely. I would not generally recommend training in both karate and tae kwon do at the same time because of the overlap, but in your case you know exactly what benefit you are seeking out.
 

Steven Craig

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Cross training is not talked up at my club to coloured belts, but is not discouraged above black. Perhaps this is done due to the high drop out rates clubs have of coloured belts-if people get a taste early of another style they may make that their main focus and leave.
 

Miles

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I teach at a multi-discipline school. I have found that cross-training in Filipino Kali has helped me understand TKD better. I would love to also train in Brazilian JJ or Hapkido.
 
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