Commando Krav Maga and Moni Aizik

drop bear

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I am just going to wax lyrical a bit here. When you are really fighting people applying stuff becomes tricky. There is a higher focus on timing and setting moves up. Strength aggression and fitness plays a role. And it is quite often the little 1% differences in a technique that decides if it works or fails.

So if we look at one throw the outer leg reap. Which is generally a SD staple. It can be done well or poorly. And poorly can mean it gets reversed. But unless you have fought that on you may never know the difference. Now we can add to that that if you wrestle you will almost never even get an opportunity to use it because they will be shoulders forwards legs back. So you have this self defence move but in a fight you may not have it.
 

K-man

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I've been attending CKM for 7 months now. I like it a lot, I just want to make sure it's the right training for me as a goal of self defense. I think the people on this forum have enough self defense experience to tell me if the techniques in CKM would work or not.
Cool! After seven months you should be getting a firm grasp on the CKM system. From the OP you are asking about techniques that could get you killed. The answer is ... it depends. Any technique can get you killed in a life and death situation if you can't pull it off. If you are banking on getting a RNC as a finishing technique but can't get to the rear position you are in big trouble. What we are really looking at is training, training , training, until the techniques become second nature. If there is a technique you are really having trouble with, personally, I would give it a miss, at least in the early stages of your training. I would be approaching your instructor, if it is a class exercise, and saying that; "This technique isn't working for me. Is there something I am doing wrong or is there a variation that may make it work for me? From my point of view as an instructor, if something isn't working for you it is up to me to show you how you can make it work or I would say forget it, because under pressure you are not going to even try to perform it. You need techniques that are almost reflex in nature that instinctively make sense.

Is there any technique in particular you are questioning?

Find a simple method that you can play with fairly safely. Like a throw or a move or something.

Then get a friend and tell them to attack you. Give them gloves or something make it safe.

But see what happens. If you can find opportunities to pull your moves off. Then it is at the first stage of being effective.

If you cant then you need to address why.
I like this advice but it still has some issues. Until you have a fair bit of experience it is hard to deal with an unscripted attack. If you have an attacker that is known ahead of time, then you are responding to a particular attack, not one that is a surprise. So the first scenario is realistic and good but at this stage of your training is likely to fail regardless as to whether it is good or not and the second scenario will probably work in training but not necessarily in real life.

By all means test your training like Drop Bear is suggesting, but be careful as to how you interpret the results.
 
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