Chinese v. Japanese bowing

isshinryuronin

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At first glance of this quote, I thought the last word was bowling and was anticipating a punch line.
what is the difference between Chinese and Japanese bowing?
Tks. opr1945
What's the difference between ignorance and apathy? - I don't know and I don't care.

What's the difference between a cat and a comma? - A cat has claws at the end of its paws and a comma is a pause at the end of a clause.

What's the difference between roast beef and pea soup? - You can roast beef, but you can't pee soup.
 
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opr1945

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In a thread I read yesterday, which I can't find now, there was a post about several videos from a Martial Arts school about the authentisity of the movements being taught and someone made a comment about mixing up Chinese and Japanese bowing among other things. I didn't know there was a difference, so I was hoping someone could enlighten me on the subject.
 
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opr1945

opr1945

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Wow, I just found it!

"I get big questions marks when I see Chinese bow in Japanese clothing. I become even more confuse when I see Chinese bow with Japanese bow. " [B]JowGaWolf[/B] Sr. Grandmaster, post #18 in thread "Old guy doing new things."

 
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Gyakuto

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Ill briefly describe the correct way to bow in Japanese martial arts.

1) Your heels should be lightly touching each other, with the feet splayed out a boy 30-45 degree (Musubi dachi).
2) Your hands should be held lightly against your thighs. Do not slap your hands against your thighs.
3) Bend forwards from your hips/waist keeping your back and neck in line (straight. Do not bob your head forward)
4) The angle of bow depends upon who or what you are bowing and is highly prescribed.
5) Your eyes should naturally face downward at the angle to which youve bowed.
6) Hold for 1-2 seconds.
7) Rise to the vertical position.
 

Gyakuto

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Bowing tends to feel awkward for Westerners since we seldom perform such a movement (unless youre a magistrate or meeting lots of Royals). The clumsiest way of (Japanese) bowing I often see is when the feet are kept apart at about shoulder width, the arms dangle forward as the torso angles forward and the head is craned upwards as they try and eyeball their opponent <shudder>
 
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opr1945

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Thank you. Actually, I had no idea there were different ways to bow.
 

Gyakuto

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Thank you. Actually, I had no idea there were different ways to bow.
The Japanese codify everything. The Ogasawara samurai family were the main codifiers of correct etiquette and theyre still in existence today. The DVD they sell on their website is fantastically clear on how to do everything from bowing, walking kneeling and eating. I love watching it!
 

Wing Woo Gar

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At first glance of this quote, I thought the last word was bowling and was anticipating a punch line.

What's the difference between ignorance and apathy? - I don't know and I don't care.

What's the difference between a cat and a comma? - A cat has claws at the end of its paws and a comma is a pause at the end of a clause.

What's the difference between roast beef and pea soup? - You can roast beef, but you can't pee soup.
Well you can lead a horticulture, but you cant make her think.
 

Wing Woo Gar

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WOW! very interesting, Thank you.
Salutations vary fromCMA style to style. Wing Woo Gar has a 6 part salutation. Shaolin White crane has a completely different version. Certain southern family forms have a salutation at beginning or end or both. All 5 animal styles have a salutation that denotes which animal form is about to be displayed. In Wing Woo Gar the open hand represents the Scholarly arts and the fist represents the martial arts, they come together to form the virtue.
 

Kung Fu Wang

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....and Chinese bowing is different how?
CMA people bow like this.

chinese_bowing.jpg
 

Gyakuto

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Salutations vary fromCMA style to style. Wing Woo Gar has a 6 part salutation. Shaolin White crane has a completely different version. Certain southern family forms have a salutation at beginning or end or both. All 5 animal styles have a salutation that denotes which animal form is about to be displayed. In Wing Woo Gar the open hand represents the Scholarly arts and the fist represents the martial arts, they come together to form the virtue.
Can you post any videos so we can see them?

This sort of gives you an idea of Japanese reiho
 

Bujingodai

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We have 4 bows. One which I think was totally made up this century. But at least they are all based in respect. Mind you we don't bow with the head faced down. We face the person.
 

Bill Mattocks

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We teach two bows in our dojo. Tachi Rei and Za Rei. Tachi Rei is done standing and Za Rei is done kneeling. In both cases, one looks at the floor in front of the person or object (example: wall of honor or 'Shomen'). When bowing to a senior, one remains in the bow until the person one is bowing to lifts up.

Since our style (Isshinryu) was mostly taught to US Marines in Okinawa by the founder, this was easily understood as being similar in function if not form to military discipline and salutes.

We don't get too crazy with it. We've been corrected slightly by visiting dignitaries from Okinawa, but only slightly. We're not too far off.

EDIT: We've had a few people on MT that have a distinct aversion to bowing or showing any kind of respect during what they consider transactional training - they pay, they get taught, end of formality. I get it, but as a US Marine veteran myself, it doesn't bother me to bow and render respect.
 

Bujingodai

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Video, have none. I will see if I can find reference though I doubt that will exist. Like I said, made up. Just stuck around

And yes, I prefer it to be that we respect the opponent to say that they could be a potential threat. Way I was taught.
 

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