Body unification

Planting the lead foot before landing the rear hand reverse punch allows you to shift more weight to the front foot, transferring more weight into the opponent for more power.
1 is better than 1, 2.

If you punch after your leading foot landing, there will be a delay. If your opponent tries to sweep your leading leg when your leading leg land, he may take you down before your punch can land on him. Sometimes, that small delay window can decide who will be on the ground.



We train to obtain body unification. In this clip, he can land his left foot first and then kick afterward. He trains to coordinate foot landing and kick at the same time.

 
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Planting the lead foot before landing the rear hand reverse punch allows you to shift more weight to the front foot, transferring more weight into the opponent for more power.

Also, it takes your head off the centerline for defensive purposes. Again, Adam's "coordinating" the lead foot and rear hand causes him to end up in the neutral position with head on the centerline. For martial purposes, that can be slipped and countered. Following the Action/Reaction principle when Adam steps, I step countering Adam by punching him in the face.

In Adam's Power Issuing video, Adam plants both feet and gets more "twisting power" by transferring more weight onto his front foot. (Raising the rear heel allows more weight transfer. Proper alignment should be head, knee, heel.)

there are more ways to get power than twisting. You don't always need to twist to gain momentum to gain power. And having to plant both feet to gain power can slow you down, and if that is the only way for you to gain power then all one has to do is keep you off balance so you cannot root with both feet.
 
there are more ways to get power than twisting. You don't always need to twist to gain momentum to gain power. And having to plant both feet to gain power can slow you down, and if that is the only way for you to gain power then all one has to do is keep you off balance so you cannot root with both feet.
On the other hand, if you are kept off balance I doubt you will be able to get much power with any method.
 
1 is better than 1, 2.
1, 2 can have more "maximum power" than 1.

If you punch after your leading foot landing, there will be a delay. If your opponent tries to sweep your leading leg when your leading leg land, he may take you down before your punch can land on him. Sometimes, that small delay window can decide who will be on the ground.

It depends on your timingyour position when entering the Fight Zone. Adam can be foot swept or punched between bringing his feet together to when he gets his maximum reach and maximum power, chambers, blocks the opponent's punch and/or punches. The longer you are on one foot, the longer you may be double weighted. The more weight you have on the front foot, the harder it is to execute that foot sweep. Do you have a video showing that foot sweep against a reverse punch?

Safe Zone = your opponent cannot reach you.
Fight Zone = your opponent can hit or kick you.

Also, Hsu's bringing both feet together with hands down can result in a KD.


We train to obtain body unification. In this clip, he can land his left foot first and then kick afterward. He trains to coordinate foot landing and kick at the
same time.


You do not "unify or coordinate" them, land your foot and kick at the same time.
 
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Weight drop training can be seen in this training. The double punches coordinate with the feet dropping.

Yes. I've seen people do this incorrectly.

Hosing was sho
Hmm I try to avoid a hard stomp, it seems to waste energy that should go into the punch. What should I think counterforce the drop is not the stomp, but the slightly downward punch. (this is why this does not work for head punches or high chesst punches at all).
If you jump up just a little and allow your body to fall to the floor you will do 1of 2 things
1. Let your body fall all the way to the floor or you'll quickly land on you a certain height and as a result you feet will it the floor hard to keep you from falling to the floor. Your feet will not naturally land soft. I'm not sure if that's possible because the drop is quick and doe last long.

You don't have to jump up as high as what Kung fu Wang"s video. It will be a short quick fall as you feet land. If you have a scale you then you can try to increase the weight on the scale by quickly bending you knees as if you knees gave away and you let you body weight fall. The scale should increase weight even though your feet don'tleave the ground.
 
The human body just like 4 independent springs (2 arms and 2 legs). Without training, all 4 springs will be compressed independently and released independently. With training, all 4 springs can be compressed at the same time and then released at the same time.
 
The human body just like 4 independent springs (2 arms and 2 legs). Without training, all 4 springs will be compressed independently and released independently. With training, all 4 springs can be compressed at the same time and then released at the same time.
Yes, you want both compress and release.

Yes. I've seen people do this incorrectly.

Hosing was sho

If you jump up just a little and allow your body to fall to the floor you will do 1of 2 things
1. Let your body fall all the way to the floor or you'll quickly land on you a certain height and as a result you feet will it the floor hard to keep you from falling to the floor. Your feet will not naturally land soft. I'm not sure if that's possible because the drop is quick and doe last long.

You don't have to jump up as high as what Kung fu Wang"s video. It will be a short quick fall as you feet land. If you have a scale you then you can try to increase the weight on the scale by quickly bending you knees as if you knees gave away and you let you body weight fall. The scale should increase weight even though your feet don't leave the ground.
You want to measure the force going horizontally into the opponent.


Bruce Lee's 6 inch punch using down -> up movementwhile pushing off both feet and straightening the lead leg.

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At 4:28, this video shows torque done after the foot is down generates more power.


And at 2:04 ...

 
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You want to measure the force going horizontally into the opponent.
I don't agree with that. Not all punches go horizontally. Yesterday I punched a heavy bad at a diagonal angle multiple times and my punch did not slip. I didnt' break the skin on my knuckle. One of my punches had bad structure and my wrist bent, but the punch did not slip. Why would I want to measure the horizontal force of the punch when I'm clearly sending the force diagonally?
 
You want to measure the force going horizontally into the opponent.
I don't agree with that. Not all punches go horizontally. Yesterday I punched a heavy bad at a diagonal angle multiple times and my punch did not slip. I didnt' break the skin on my knuckle. One of my punches had bad structure and my wrist bent, but the punch did not slip. Why would I want to measure the horizontal force of the punch when I'm clearly sending the force diagonally?
Ok. A more accurate statement is measure the force going into the target/opponent, not only the ground reaction force.
 
this video shows torque done after the foot is down generates more power.
I'll have to video take myself hitting the heavy bag with hard shots to know how true this is. I do it almost instinctively so I have to actually do it to be able to say one way or another.
 
Re: Bruce Lee video clip, post #70 -

I don't know why it's called the "six-inch punch" as the punch starts by his thigh, about 36 inches away. I saw him do a similar demo, not very exciting. This was during his Green Hornet days, prior to his movie star status, so he was not held in much awe. Joe Lewis, who was better known at that time amongst karate guys, then showed off his famous side kick, explaining how his power method was much superior. In the battle of egos, I'd have to give the win to Lewis.

There are several ways to generate power using "body unification" concepts. I don't think there is a best way as it largely depends on one's circumstance at the time and which method can be best employed. One's individual body type may also play a part.

"Maximum power" is a factor that is over-emphasized in self-defense, IMO. One only needs enough power to get the job done. There are other factors that I think are more important such as balance, timing and speed (all of which can contribute to power) and in the effort to generate maximum power one can actually hinder these other factors.
 
I practice hitting my heavy bag with a downward diagonal punch on almost a daily basis, sometimes with rotation and just dropping bodyweight, sometimes while slightly lifting my foot and falling into the punch. At close range to the fold where the thigh meets the hip, it'll easily break a person's structure or take em down. That I can say from experience. I've been told this technique is highly effective for targeting the front of the hip girdle as it compresses the opponent between your fist and ground. Never hit anyone with it though so who knows.
I can say for sure though, that falling into a makiwara with a punch feels different than being planted while hitting it. If I drop step with a jab, and land the following reverse punch a hair before my foot hits the ground, I'm pretty sure I get more power into that reverse punch than a rooted reverse punch. But I may be doing something during the falling 1-2 that I'm not during the rooted punch. Will have to play around and test this tonight.
 
"Maximum power" is a factor that is over-emphasized in self-defense,
But if you can train

- maximum power, why do you want to train partial power?
- body unification, why do you want to train none body unification?

IMO, both partial power and none body unification doesn't need any training.
 
maximum power, why do you want to train partial power?
I didn't say not to train it. Just to keep it in perspective as I wrote in my post and repeat for you below:
"Maximum power" is a factor that is over-emphasized in self-defense, IMO. One only needs enough power to get the job done. There are other factors that I think are more important such as balance, timing and speed (all of which can contribute to power) and in the effort to generate maximum power one can actually hinder these other factors.

- body unification, why do you want to train none body unification?
I did not say this either. I even discussed its use as noted below:
There are several ways to generate power using "body unification" concepts.
 
I didn't say not to train it. Just to keep it in perspective as I wrote in my post and repeat for you below:

I did not say this either. I even discussed its use as noted below:
Those are general questions (to everybody) and not address to you. Both are common sense to me.

A: Why do I need to train body unification?
B: If you can achieve body unification, why do you want none body unification?
 
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