bob/ weave/ evade

cfr

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So Im new to sparring and learning quite a bit. Ive been analyzing what I need to different to get better and this is what Ive come up with.

I NEED to rely more on bob/ weaving/ head movement. My tactic thus far has been go in/ take a few swings / go out. The problem is though that it seems to be an awful lot of wasted movement. I need to go in and learn to stay in for a bit more without getting pummled. How do I lean to bob/ weave/ evade? Speaking mostly in reference to when Im not in class and training on my own. I know Ill take some smacks. But my only tactic thus far is to back out.
 

MJS

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cfr said:
So Im new to sparring and learning quite a bit. Ive been analyzing what I need to different to get better and this is what Ive come up with.

I NEED to rely more on bob/ weaving/ head movement. My tactic thus far has been go in/ take a few swings / go out. The problem is though that it seems to be an awful lot of wasted movement. I need to go in and learn to stay in for a bit more without getting pummled. How do I lean to bob/ weave/ evade? Speaking mostly in reference to when Im not in class and training on my own. I know Ill take some smacks. But my only tactic thus far is to back out.

This is something that will take some practice. Like anything, its not going to happen overnight. One thing that will help would be to get used to these movements. Start off in a static position, having your training partner slowly throw strikes...a jab, cross, hook, etc. and work on these movements. Of course, make sure to mix up the order of the strikes. Next, you can start out by adding in more movement. Do some slow sparring, with your partner being the ony one to throw strikes. This will start to train you in performing these movements while moving. Eventually begin to add in your own counter strikes. You can also work focus pad drills while doing these movements. Shadow boxing when you're on your own is good practice.

Again, this takes time. My inst. often does drills like this in class. Of course, I sometimes find myself resorting back to a blocking movement rather than doing the bob and weave. Just goes to show that it takes time and practice to get used to this.

Mike
 

Kenpodoc

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1. Shadow box
2. Slow sparring - go as slowly as you need to read movement, speed will come with practice.
3. Kick boxing/ boxing drills with a trainer with focus pads.

Good luck,

Jeff
 

searcher

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A few things that I have learned over the years of fighting in knockdown, boxing, and kickboxing that might help.

If you have a heavy bag to work out on, put your forehead on the bag and start working body hoos and body uppercuts without letting your head come away from the bag.

Hag up a rope and practice slipping under the rope from side to side while moving forward and backwards. You can mix this up by throwing some punches.

Get a maze ball or some type of small bag that you can hang up. Swing the bag and then start slipping and working around the bag without getting hit. Make the bag hard and with some weight so if it hits you it will help you want to avoind it.

While you are sparring start moving your elbows around in conjunction with your other movement. This will not give your opponent a clean shot on any target. You should also move your feet and don't stay in one place for very long. Never move into or out of an opponents range without slipping and nevr straight in. Always circle.

Hope this helps.
 

tradrockrat

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searcher said:
A few things that I have learned over the years of fighting in knockdown, boxing, and kickboxing that might help.

If you have a heavy bag to work out on, put your forehead on the bag and start working body hoos and body uppercuts without letting your head come away from the bag.

Hag up a rope and practice slipping under the rope from side to side while moving forward and backwards. You can mix this up by throwing some punches.

Get a maze ball or some type of small bag that you can hang up. Swing the bag and then start slipping and working around the bag without getting hit. Make the bag hard and with some weight so if it hits you it will help you want to avoind it.

While you are sparring start moving your elbows around in conjunction with your other movement. This will not give your opponent a clean shot on any target. You should also move your feet and don't stay in one place for very long. Never move into or out of an opponents range without slipping and nevr straight in. Always circle.

Hope this helps.

What he said.:) I've done the drills described, and they worked very well for me.
 

arnisador

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It's been tough for me (in JKD). It's so different from the Karate I started in years ago!
 

FearlessFreep

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If you have a heavy bag to work out on, put your forehead on the bag and start working body hoos and body uppercuts without letting your head come away from the bag.


Hey, I tried that yesterday and it worked really well. A lot of times in sparring we end up in really close and it's good to throw in some hooks before backing out again. I've never been happy with my power in there, but this seemed to be a good exercise towork on it.
 
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