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redmen

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How much beg of wet sand would I need to fill bob up half way up and full way up? Please dont answer with I think if you dont know for sure let alone try it before please keep it moving along thank you very much.
 

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In the past I've used water, works just as well as sand. I can't give any specific numbers though.
 

Bob Hubbard

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The amount will depend on the size of the bags of sand.
I've seen reference to 4 50lb bags, to 6 40lb bags.
I also don't know if there are variations in base sizes.
But based on the above, I'd guestimate that you'll need about 2,888 cubic inches to fill it half way, or 5,776 CI for full, depending on the specific density and moisture level of the sand you use, and the uniformity of the grains.
 

Mephisto

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Sooo if you dont know why answer
I suggested water as an alternative, it's cheap and readily available. Why not just disregard my post if you don't find it helpful? This is a discussion forum, others read the topics and posts and can benefit from the discussion. If you don't find an answer helpful someone else might.
 

jks9199

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How much beg of wet sand would I need to fill bob up half way up and full way up? Please dont answer with I think if you dont know for sure let alone try it before please keep it moving along thank you very much.
What is your goal? Are you trying to put enough weight in to keep your Bob from moving? Or are you trying to fill Bob himself up with sand?

You can find the volume of the base with basic math: Measure your base's diameter. Divide it in half for the radius. Measure the height of the base. Multiply the radius times pi (3.1415 or 22/7), times the height. I found several tools easily on the web to calculate how many pounds of sand to equal a given volume. This one looked useful: Volume to Weight converter
At a guestimate, using the dimensions listed by Century and guessing at the height of the base, I'd figure about 470 lbs sand. That seems reasonable since they say it can be filled with water to hit a total weight of 270 lbs, and a similar volume of water is about 240-250 lbs. I'll leave figuring out halfway to you... I'd say, if you're using sand, you might want to be pretty sure it's where you want it when you fill it. (By the way, water doesn't add that much weight to the sand and I'd discourage using wet sand because it's very likely to mold and grow "stuff.")

(By the way -- Bob Hubbard prefers to be filled with pizza & mead, not wet sand... :D )
 
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redmen

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[QUOTEorder Hubbard, post: 1692228, member: 1"]The amount will depend on the size of the bags of sand.
I've seen reference to 4 50lb bags, to 6 40lb bags.
I also don't know if there are variations in base sizes.
But based on the above, I'd guestimate that you'll need about 2,888 cubic inches to fill it half way, or 5,776 CI for full, depending on the specific density and moisture level of the sand you use, and the uniformity of the grains.[/QUOTE]
So in order to fill central Bob half way how many bags of wet sand should I be using? and if I wanna fill central bob up how many bags of wet sand should I be using? Thats two questions I need answers to.
 
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redmen

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What is your goal? Are you trying to put enough weight in to keep your Bob from moving? Or are you trying to fill Bob himself up with sand?

You can find the volume of the base with basic math: Measure your base's diameter. Divide it in half for the radius. Measure the height of the base. Multiply the radius times pi (3.1415 or 22/7), times the height. I found several tools easily on the web to calculate how many pounds of sand to equal a given volume. This one looked useful: Volume to Weight converter
At a guestimate, using the dimensions listed by Century and guessing at the height of the base, I'd figure about 470 lbs sand. That seems reasonable since they say it can be filled with water to hit a total weight of 270 lbs, and a similar volume of water is about 240-250 lbs. I'll leave figuring out halfway to you... I'd say, if you're using sand, you might want to be pretty sure it's where you want it when you fill it. (By the way, water doesn't add that much weight to the sand and I'd discourage using wet sand because it's very likely to mold and grow "stuff.")

(By the way -- Bob Hubbard prefers to be filled with pizza & mead, not wet sand... :D )
So he wont move at all just like a
What is your goal? Are you trying to put enough weight in to keep your Bob from moving? Or are you trying to fill Bob himself up with sand?

You can find the volume of the base with basic math: Measure your base's diameter. Divide it in half for the radius. Measure the height of the base. Multiply the radius times pi (3.1415 or 22/7), times the height. I found several tools easily on the web to calculate how many pounds of sand to equal a given volume. This one looked useful: Volume to Weight converter
At a guestimate, using the dimensions listed by Century and guessing at the height of the base, I'd figure about 470 lbs sand. That seems reasonable since they say it can be filled with water to hit a total weight of 270 lbs, and a similar volume of water is about 240-250 lbs. I'll leave figuring out halfway to you... I'd say, if you're using sand, you might want to be pretty sure it's where you want it when you fill it. (By the way, water doesn't add that much weight to the sand and I'd discourage using wet sand because it's very likely to mold and grow "stuff.")

(By the way -- Bob Hubbard prefers to be filled with pizza & mead, not wet sand... :D )

to fill up
What is your goal? Are you trying to put enough weight in to keep your Bob from moving? Or are you trying to fill Bob himself up with sand?

You can find the volume of the base with basic math: Measure your base's diameter. Divide it in half for the radius. Measure the height of the base. Multiply the radius times pi (3.1415 or 22/7), times the height. I found several tools easily on the web to calculate how many pounds of sand to equal a given volume. This one looked useful: Volume to Weight converter
At a guestimate, using the dimensions listed by Century and guessing at the height of the base, I'd figure about 470 lbs sand. That seems reasonable since they say it can be filled with water to hit a total weight of 270 lbs, and a similar volume of water is about 240-250 lbs. I'll leave figuring out halfway to you... I'd say, if you're using sand, you might want to be pretty sure it's where you want it when you fill it. (By the way, water doesn't add that much weight to the sand and I'd discourage using wet sand because it's very likely to mold and grow "stuff.")

(By the way -- Bob Hubbard prefers to be filled with pizza & mead, not wet sand... :D )
What is your goal? Are you trying to put enough weight in to keep your Bob from moving? Or are you trying to fill Bob himself up with sand?

You can find the volume of the base with basic math: Measure your base's diameter. Divide it in half for the radius. Measure the height of the base. Multiply the radius times pi (3.1415 or 22/7), times the height. I found several tools easily on the web to calculate how many pounds of sand to equal a given volume. This one looked useful: Volume to Weight converter
At a guestimate, using the dimensions listed by Century and guessing at the height of the base, I'd figure about 470 lbs sand. That seems reasonable since they say it can be filled with water to hit a total weight of 270 lbs, and a similar volume of water is about 240-250 lbs. I'll leave figuring out halfway to you... I'd say, if you're using sand, you might want to be pretty sure it's where you want it when you fill it. (By the way, water doesn't add that much weight to the sand and I'd discourage using wet sand because it's very likely to mold and grow "stuff.")

(By the way -- Bob Hubbard prefers to be filled with pizza & mead, not wet sand... :D )
[QUOTEorder Hubbard, post: 1692228, member: 1"]The amount will depend on the size of the bags of sand.
I've seen reference to 4 50lb bags, to 6 40lb bags.
I also don't know if there are variations in base sizes.
But based on the above, I'd guestimate that you'll need about 2,888 cubic inches to fill it half way, or 5,776 CI for full, depending on the specific density and moisture level of the sand you use, and the uniformity of the grains.
So in order to fill central Bob half way how many bags of wet sand should I be using? and if I wanna fill central bob up how many bags of wet sand should I be using? Thats two questions I need answers to.[/QUOTE]
To fill c
What is your goal? Are you trying to put enough weight in to keep your Bob from moving? Or are you trying to fill Bob himself up with sand?

You can find the volume of the base with basic math: Measure your base's diameter. Divide it in half for the radius. Measure the height of the base. Multiply the radius times pi (3.1415 or 22/7), times the height. I found several tools easily on the web to calculate how many pounds of sand to equal a given volume. This one looked useful: Volume to Weight converter
At a guestimate, using the dimensions listed by Century and guessing at the height of the base, I'd figure about 470 lbs sand. That seems reasonable since they say it can be filled with water to hit a total weight of 270 lbs, and a similar volume of water is about 240-250 lbs. I'll leave figuring out halfway to you... I'd say, if you're using sand, you might want to be pretty sure it's where you want it when you fill it. (By the way, water doesn't add that much weight to the sand and I'd discourage using wet sand because it's very likely to mold and grow "stuff.")

(By the way -- Bob Hubbard prefers to be filled with pizza & mead, not wet sand... :D )
To fill central bob up with bags of wet sand to the point it wont move at all
 

Blindside

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50 pound bags of sand are something like $3.50 at Home Depot, I think I used three and a portion of the forth. I did not try to fill the stem, I don't want to reduce the low center of balance by adding weight in the stem. I didn't add water, the seams on these have been known to break in the past, not worth my time to clean up leaky bags, dry sand is (IMO) a better alternative.
 

Bob Hubbard

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[QUOTEorder Hubbard, post: 1692228, member: 1"]The amount will depend on the size of the bags of sand.
I've seen reference to 4 50lb bags, to 6 40lb bags.
I also don't know if there are variations in base sizes.
But based on the above, I'd guestimate that you'll need about 2,888 cubic inches to fill it half way, or 5,776 CI for full, depending on the specific density and moisture level of the sand you use, and the uniformity of the grains.
So in order to fill central Bob half way how many bags of wet sand should I be using? and if I wanna fill central bob up how many bags of wet sand should I be using? Thats two questions I need answers to.[/QUOTE]
In order to answer that, we'd need to know how big "a bag" is. We also would need to know the fillable volume of the Bob stand. Assuming your bags are 50lb bags, then 4 would be fully filled, according to the references I saw. So for half way, that's 4 / 2 which equals 2. So if 4 bags is full, then 2 bags is half. However, if your bags are 40lb bags, then it'll be 6 for full and 3 (which is half of 6) for half. If you have no idea how big your bags are then we can't tell you how many you'll need. In which case 5,776 cubic inches for full, or 2,888 cubic inches for half. Savvy?
 

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To fill central bob up with bags of wet sand to the point it wont move at all
Can't tell you how many bags, because I don't know how big a bag of sand is. You go to a stone yard, garden center, cement factory, or the like, and you can get 50 to 100 lb bags of construction grade sand. Go to a home improvement store like Lowes or Home Depot, and you're looking at a 20 or 25 lb bag, generally, I think.

I would actually suggest you use sanitized play sand. You're going to be sealing it up inside the plastic, and you really don't want it growing stuff...
 

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How much beg of wet sand would I need to fill bob up half way up and full way up? Please dont answer with I think if you dont know for sure let alone try it before please keep it moving along thank you very much.


Sorry I don't have any idea but wanted to say welcome to MT.
 
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redmen

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It dosnt matter what the size of the beg is damm ok ok its a home depot near me now that thats out the way. How many begs of wet sand do i need in oder to fill central Bob all the way up so he wont move around at all? Now what size should i be using as far as home depot gos?
 

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It dosnt matter what the size of the beg is damm ok ok its a home depot near me now that thats out the way. How many begs of wet sand do i need in oder to fill central Bob all the way up so he wont move around at all? Now what size should i be using as far as home depot gos?

Try buying 4 50 pound bags, fill it with dry sand, then add water until its full. Let us know how it goes.
 

Bob Hubbard

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It dosnt matter what the size of the beg is damm ok ok its a home depot near me now that thats out the way. How many begs of wet sand do i need in oder to fill central Bob all the way up so he wont move around at all? Now what size should i be using as far as home depot gos?

"It doesn't matter what size the bag is" Right.
A 50 lb bag holds more sand than a 40 lb bag. If you want to know how many bags, you need to know how much sand is in each bag.
If you don't understand this, then I can't help you.

Go buy 4 begs. I assume a beg holds the same amount as a bag so start there. If it's not enough, go buy more. If it's too much, sprinkle the left over around the garden. It'll help with the drainage.

Also, the Home Depot by me sells 40, 50 and bulk sand. So the size does matter.

Just take the empty base with you and tell the guy at the counter "Fill er up!"
 

Bob Hubbard

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Assuming this is correct: "5,776 cubic inches for full, or 2,888 cubic inches for half."

A 50 lb. bag of QUIKRETE Play Sand contains approximately 0.5 cubic feet of sand.

0.5 cf = 864 ci

2888 / 864 = 3 1/3 bags of sand. So 4 are needed.

5776 / 864 = 6 3/4 bags of sand. So 7 are needed.

It seems most go with 4 bags as that's a 200lb base and don't worry about half vs full. So start with 4 and if you keep knocking it over, add another bag of sand.

Also, previous discussion about sand vs water
Sand or water MartialTalk.Com - Friendly Martial Arts Forum Community


Just to be an *** though..... all of this assumes you're using play sand. If you use pool filter sand, or landscaping sand, the measurements change because the size of each grain of sand varies by use. fmueller.com Substrate Pool Filter Sand

For example, man-made coarse sand grains range in size from 0.50 to 1.00 millimeters and very coarse sand 1.00 to 2.00 millimeters. Fine sand, such as play sand, ranges from 0.10 to 0.25 millimeters in size. Finer sand compacts more, meaning it won't fill the tube as much.

http://www.quikrete.com/PDFs/MSDS-B4-Playsand.pdf
 

Tez3

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Just use water...the sound it makes when you hit the thing is soothing or am I thinking that when you hit your Bob imagining its someone you can't stand is soothing?
 
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