18oz gloves good for a workout???

zoso

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Hey all, I'm here with another glove query!

I'm considering getting some beefy 18oz gloves because they'll give me a better workout and also protect my hands that bit more.

I'm doing pads, bags and eventually light sparing.

I weigh around 175lbs, so Im not massive by any means would they be ridiculously heavy?? I mean, they cant be that much different from 16's surely??
 

Rob2109

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Are you shadow boxing with weights already? If you're looking to increase strength, 5 to 10 rounds with 5lb (2.3kg) weights will be more beneficial than heavier gloves.
 

Jenna

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Wow those are a heavy set my friend.. of course there is not much difference between these and the 16s though the fatigue is increased by a big factor over 16s with every minute of use.. I agree with Rob2109 and but I would not discourage you from giving it a try.. If your bagwork and sparring technique does not suffer noticably from fatigue then you may have found the extra little training edge! Just a thought :)
Wishes, Jenna x
 
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zoso

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I've finally decided on the 16oz gloves; I will definately try rob's suggestion of shadow boxing with weights.

My technique does suffer from fatigue so 16s will do for now!

Cheers
 

jks9199

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Are you shadow boxing with weights already? If you're looking to increase strength, 5 to 10 rounds with 5lb (2.3kg) weights will be more beneficial than heavier gloves.
Not a great idea. 5 pounds is enough to hurt your joints if you aren't careful. 2 lbs is a better choice -- and more than any glove starts out.
 

Akira

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Im going to give you some different advice, just to confuse you more.

Bag and pad work should be done with bag gloves, nothing heavier. If you need more protection wear hand wraps as well.

When you're sparring, if you're just doing boxing, you should wear 14/16s. I love these gloves, it's like being hit by a pillow.

If you're sparring muay thai you should wear 10s.

If you want to get stronger, I would advise shadow boxing with weights as Rob and jks suggested, although you can use smaller weights if the ones suggested are too heavy to start with.

Other people (foreigners, not my trainers at my gym in Thailand) have suggested to me to train with heavier gloves to increase my endurance and power, but realistically I don't notice any difference when I'm training between using bag gloves or heavier gloves the whole session. I prefer using lighter gloves as much as I can anyway. Sometimes I'll use 10s if my knuckles are sore just to give them a rest, but that only happens every 5 or 6 months.

Typically nowadays I'll do my rounds on the pads and bags with bag mitts and wraps, do 2 rounds of tyre/footwork practicing combos with weights, and finish up shadow boxing 2 rounds with weights. This is when I'm not sparring.
 

Rob2109

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Not a great idea. 5 pounds is enough to hurt your joints if you aren't careful.

Yeah, i should of added that i use 5lbs, but that might not be suitable for everyone. Start low and find a weight that you're comfortable with.
 

jks9199

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What I'll do with five pound weights on occasion is practice SLOWLY, concentrating on form and technique, not power. I'm trying to feel each muscle involved and when and how they get used... I've also just practiced holding my hands up in stance with the heavier weights.

For shadowboxing and faster movements, I rarely go above 2 pounds or so. Adding too much weight to fast movement is just a recipe to do bad things to yourself, like hyperextend your elbow or hurt your shoulders. (Trust me...)
 

Rob2109

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Kind of jumping in, so sorry Akira as the question was directed at you.
The tyre drill is bouncing on it for a few rounds, much like a mini trampoline. We do this carrying dumbells in fighting stance and wearing ankle weights, weights are optional of course.

JKS mentioned about doing slower shadowboxing with weights which is correct of course. Concentrate on technique and keeping your guard up, speed will come with correct technique.
 

Tez3

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Another tyre drill, get a very big one and belt it with a sledgehammer. Then tie it to a rope around your waist and drag it as far as you can. (You can buy special 'sledges' for that exercise but why waste money).
Hitting the tyre with a very big hammer is a good exercise but also strangely soothing lol!
 

Akira

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can you explain in detail whats the tire drill is about.?

All good Rob! The more people contributing to this forum and discussing techniques, the better.

Another variation is to stand in your 'fighters stance' and shift your weight back and forward (so that you're still bouncing, but not straight up and down) while you're throwing simple combinations with weights in your hand.

Combos - jab
jab-cross
jab-cross-hook
jab-cross-straight punch-elbow

I've seen it done both this way and the way Rob has described.

The sledgehammer drill that Tez has described is used by a very traditional gym in Thailand, Sor Ploenchit (amongst others). They have a lot of kids training there that were either sold by their parents, or orphaned from a young age.
 
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Nibla

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Im going to give you some different advice, just to confuse you more.

Bag and pad work should be done with bag gloves, nothing heavier. If you need more protection wear hand wraps as well.

When you're sparring, if you're just doing boxing, you should wear 14/16s. I love these gloves, it's like being hit by a pillow.

If you're sparring muay thai you should wear 10s.

Hey Akira, what's your reasoning for this? Reasoning I can see is training as you intend to fight, so get used to weight you'll have in a real fight, and not relying so much on the mass of the gloves to block your head etc?

Ta.
 

Akira

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We wear heavier gloves when we're sparring to avoid injury. We spar 3/4 times a week at high intensity. Wearing giant pillows on your hands means you can belt the bejesus out of each other and not get too badly hurt. I don't like to use the gloves to just cover up or block much anyway, better to move my head and use good footwork to get out of the way and create openings.

I wear bag gloves at other times for a couple of reasons - it ensures I'm striking with the correct part of my fist, and the trainers find it hard to hold pads for someone going all out AND wearing 10 oz gloves too. The other reason is all the thais there were using bag gloves and I figured if it was good enough for them it was good enough for me.

I'm also going to hazard a guess and say training with bag gloves for 4 hours + a day will strengthen your knuckles and wrists more than using heavier gloves too.
 

searcher

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I usually train with some 20 oz. my wife got for an anniversary present a few years back. I also do my sparring with them. Other than feeling like pillows, they are not noticably heavier.

Title Boxing has some that start as 16 and can weight add to 2.5 pounds. They are a great option for you to add wt later on.
 

Nibla

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We wear heavier gloves when we're sparring to avoid injury. We spar 3/4 times a week at high intensity. Wearing giant pillows on your hands means you can belt the bejesus out of each other and not get too badly hurt. I don't like to use the gloves to just cover up or block much anyway, better to move my head and use good footwork to get out of the way and create openings.

I wear bag gloves at other times for a couple of reasons - it ensures I'm striking with the correct part of my fist, and the trainers find it hard to hold pads for someone going all out AND wearing 10 oz gloves too. The other reason is all the thais there were using bag gloves and I figured if it was good enough for them it was good enough for me.

I'm also going to hazard a guess and say training with bag gloves for 4 hours + a day will strengthen your knuckles and wrists more than using heavier gloves too.

Yeah we use 16 oz for sparring. Still don't understand sparring muay thai with 10oz however.

Fair point about using bag gloves though.
 

Thunder Foot

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Some great replies in here.
It seems to me that the original poster's motive for using bigger gloves was to build endurance. In this case, you can also opt for the weighted gloves. Ringside makes gloves that can be increased up to 5lbs per glove. the same benefits can be acquired shadowboxing with weights, however using the glove just makes it a little more satisfying in the ability to make that contact.
 

Jimi

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The weight of gloves can vary depending on where you slap them on. LOL. When I went to Thailand, it was for my belated honeymoon/1st anniversary, so i did not bring gear, but when i hit Phuket Muay Thai gym for a day to play so to speak, they had left all the gear on the ring apron the night before and it rained. lol.

The gear, Thai Pads, Focus Mitts, Gloves, Shin Guards, Head gear, Belly Pads you name it, were completely rain soaked. I put on a 16oz. pair of gloves after I warmed up, and my god they were heavy as lead, lol. Hitting the heavy bag was like walking through a rain forest, every punch sprayed misty wet glove clouds in the air.

The former champs there training w/ me laughed but were a little offput cause I am sure the Gym owner would give them greif for the equip. mishap later.

When I was working the Thai Pads, the elbows were so damned much easier to throw than my Jab, cross, hook etc.., LOL! Then when I sparred one of the former champs, my arms were very heavy, but the length of my arm compared to the average Thai, he could kick at my thigh and I would leg check and put a Jab on his nose from that far away. LOL. Was very fun, but the gloves can weigh on you alright.

The heavier the gloves the safer the sparring or a fight/match but the bigger gloves make some rely on them too much as shields because of the size. They also get into each others way and can look like the old "PILLOW PUNCHER commercial, lol.

A smaller glove you can not rest on the turtle or peek-a-boo guard as much and a smaller fist can get inside any hole given, and when that smaller gloved fist finds its mark, boom boom, out go the lights.

Just wanted to share, I find that over the years I have gathered several sets of gloves depending on what I prefer to work or what club is doing. I have ripped thru several pairs of the Everlast bag gloves 4306 :) cause i love to use those for focus mitts, but the larger the glove more likely will be used for sparring, but a hate too heavy of a large fist to spar w/, feel like I got a basketball on each fist. lol.
 

jks9199

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The weight of gloves can vary depending on where you slap them on. LOL. When I went to Thailand, it was for my belated honeymoon/1st anniversary, so i did not bring gear, but when i hit Phuket Muay Thai gym for a day to play so to speak, they had left all the gear on the ring apron the night before and it rained. lol.

There's a lot of truth to that...

I kickboxed for a couple of years in one amateur event, and because of my weight, I was always towards the end of the card. In the event, to ensure everyone has appropriate gear, the gloves are provided... But by the end of the night, the gloves that started out 16 oz, tend to move closer to 20 oz, as they absorb sweat.
 
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