10 San Sik drills

futsaowingchun

Brown Belt
Joined
Jan 30, 2009
Messages
438
Reaction score
82
Location
NJ, USA

The 10 basic San Sik Wing Chun drills that compliment the Siu Lin Tao form ( Wing Chun's first form ) These partner drills teach the basic application of the foundation of the Wing Chun system.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Kung Fu Wang

Sr. Grandmaster
Joined
Sep 26, 2012
Messages
10,420
Reaction score
2,601
Location
Austin, Tx/Shell Beach, Ca
At 4.15, you use your right Gou Shou to grab and pull your opponent's right arm. This will prevent your opponent from pulling his right arm back. I like this concept. You are not using it at 3.07. Just wonder why?
 
OP
futsaowingchun

futsaowingchun

Brown Belt
Joined
Jan 30, 2009
Messages
438
Reaction score
82
Location
NJ, USA
At 4.15, you use your right Gou Shou to grab and pull your opponent's right arm. This will prevent your opponent from pulling his right arm back. I like this concept. You are not using it at 3.07. Just wonder why?
At 3:07 I'm doing a different drill ( Pak Sao ) which is not a grabbing action.
 

geezer

Grandmaster
MT Mentor
Joined
Oct 20, 2007
Messages
6,772
Reaction score
2,765
Location
Phoenix, AZ
Futsao, are these "san-sik" drills traditional to your lineage or drills that you have assembled to augment your curriculum? Also, do you have any way of linking these drills to give the students a sense of flow?

In the lineage of Yip Man WC I trained, coming through Leung Ting, we have a program of such drills called "Lat Sau". The Hong Kong version was a fairly simple set of drills which was later expanded extensively by the EWTO under Keith Kernspecht. Now there are many different groups coming from a WT background and each has a sightly different take on these drills. At their best, they train good basic skills from stance and steps to a variety of attacks and defenses in a way that can be applied repeatedly or with random variations against a partner in a continuous flowing drill.

Here are some examples from different instructors representing different organizations. First Victor Gutierrez. His group initiates with a typical pak-da cycle as a platform from which to practice different attacks and counters:


Now here's an EBMAS version. Emin's people replace the pak-da cycle with continuous punches, emphasizing offense, but using the bridges to check and control their opponent's arms in exactly the same way:



And here's a slower, more demo-style version done by some Aussie with a really cool shirt. I am a little surprised by the elbow up-and-out hook defense from 3:22 to about 3:40. Seems like you are really opening up your ribs? But it's Australia after all. I'm told that they even turn differently down there due to the Coriolis effect. Forgive me Mook!



Now, from the world's No. 2 most awesomest master, second only to Chuck Norris, here's the best, most updated drill which replaces all those above:

 
Last edited by a moderator:

ST1Doppelganger

Brown Belt
Joined
Apr 10, 2014
Messages
473
Reaction score
130
OMG on the last video clip is all I have to say.

I also love how allot of people that knows a bit about WC assumes its always about chain punching.
 

Kung Fu Wang

Sr. Grandmaster
Joined
Sep 26, 2012
Messages
10,420
Reaction score
2,601
Location
Austin, Tx/Shell Beach, Ca
At 3:07 I'm doing a different drill ( Pak Sao ) which is not a grabbing action.
Your left hand is doing the Pak Shou, but it doesn't prevent your right hand to pull your opponent's arm into you first.

- A right hand pulling,
- followed by a left hand Pak Shou,
- followed by a right punch to the face,

can be a lighting speed punching combo. Your right hand pulling can let the counter force to pull yourself into your opponent. It can provide your the initial speed that you will need to close in the gape.

At 0.23 of the following clip, if the guy on the left used his left hand to pull his opponent's right arm 45 degree downward toward his opponent's left, it will be much harder for his opponent to make his right arm free and counter him.

The WC sticky hands may unnecessary give your opponent too much arm freedom which will be against your own interest. IMO, the arm grabbing is not used enough in the WC sticky hands.

 
Last edited by a moderator:
OP
futsaowingchun

futsaowingchun

Brown Belt
Joined
Jan 30, 2009
Messages
438
Reaction score
82
Location
NJ, USA
Futsao, are these "san-sik" drills traditional to your lineage or drills that you have assembled to augment your curriculum? Also, do you have any way of linking these drills to give the students a sense of flow?

In the lineage of Yip Man WC I trained, coming through Leung Ting, we have a program of such drills called "Lat Sau". The Hong Kong version was a fairly simple set of drills which was later expanded extensively by the EWTO under Keith Kernspecht. Now there are many different groups coming from a WT background and each has a sightly different take on these drills. At their best, they train good basic skills from stance and steps to a variety of attacks and defenses in a way that can be applied repeatedly or with random variations against a partner in a continuous flowing drill.

Here are some examples from different instructors representing different organizations. First Victor Gutierrez. His group initiates with a typical pak-da cycle as a platform from which to practice different attacks and counters:


Now here's an EBMAS version. Emin's people replace the pak-da cycle with continuous punches, emphasizing offense, but using the bridges to check and control their opponent's arms in exactly the same way:



And here's a slower, more demo-style version done by some Aussie with a really cool shirt. I am a little surprised by the elbow up-and-out hook defense from 3:22 to about 3:40. Seems like you are really opening up your ribs? But it's Australia after all. I'm told that they even turn differently down there due to the Coriolis effect. Forgive me Mook!



Now, from the world's No. 2 most awesomest master, second only to Chuck Norris, here's the best, most updated drill which replaces all those above:

[

Futsao, are these "san-sik" drills traditional to your lineage or drills that you have assembled to augment your curriculum? Also, do you have any way of linking these drills to give the students a sense of flow?

No.. fut Sao does not use these drills. They do have other drills but i created these to make my students combat ready as soon as possible. I have done research on other wc lineages like Pin san wc and feel they have a more practical training method compared to Fut Sao and most Ip Man wc. One thing fut sao is really good at is a sense of flow.this is mostly trained in out chi sao,so for me i dont need to have a flow in the drill because they will get that in the chi sao. if you look at my video i posted called crossing the bridge, this concept is all about flow..


And here's a slower, more demo-style version done by some Aussie with a really cool shirt. I am a little surprised by the elbow up-and-out hook defense from 3:22 to about 3:40. Seems like you are really opening up your ribs? But it's Australia after all. I'm told that they even turn differently down there due to the Coriolis effect. Forgive me

I do like the idea of Lat Sao,but I have a different way of training the same idea. The elbow you see at 3.22 is not wing chun it comes from the Filipino martial art Kali. I guess they just incorporated in the wing chun.I myself would not do it that way. I would use Fok sao do do the same job..
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Cephalopod

Green Belt
Joined
Jun 18, 2014
Messages
193
Reaction score
100
Location
Pacific NW
... from the world's No. 2 most awesomest master...

Grandmaster Ken is a warrior of unparalleled wisdom. I practice this very drill religiously but my daughter schools me.


I fear I might take a few tomatoes to the head for saying so but practicing fixed drills, like on the OPs video, makes me really irritable.

I generally only do it when I train with a friend from another school, but I find myself constantly wanting to bypass, hit, counter-hit, wedge down the center, or do pretty much anything rather that sit there frozen while my partner applies his techniques.

Of course as beginners there were a few drills that we worked on to get the basics down but in the most part, we learn everything as movements in the forms and Mook jong and then the application is taught in the context of live hand drills...chi sao, lap sao, gor sao, off hand sparring.

Ideas are basically passed down the line of seniority. For example: my sifu trashes my structure and slides his offense through the hole. He shows me whats going on. I can't do it back to him despite my best effort but then I train with someone my junior and try the same on him (usually with sifu watching and laughing 'cus I just don't get it). Repeat (usually more than twice...) until I can execute with my partner trying his best to thwart. Meanwhile my partner finds someone his junior...and so forth.

Now I'm certainly not saying that this is a "superior" method of training. My guess is that although it may take longer to acquire any given tool or principle, when you do get it, it works for you under duress against a live opponent who is doing everything he can to screw up your game.
it is also, in my thinking, a simply more fun way to train.
 

Latest Discussions

Top