Why does MMA count as an own martial art now ?

Discussion in 'MMA' started by JohnnyEnglish, Aug 2, 2015.

  1. drop bear

    drop bear Sr. Grandmaster

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    Power ranger gear would rock.
     
  2. FriedRice

    FriedRice Master Black Belt

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    You don't understand, real fighting.
     
  3. Ironbear24

    Ironbear24 Senior Master

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    MMA is not a martial art, but it is however a collection of martial arts.
     
  4. Buka

    Buka Sr. Grandmaster

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    I was away part of the summer and completely missed this.
    That is what I think should be the sparring aspect of training in every karate school. (In the ones that have sparring)
     
  5. drop bear

    drop bear Sr. Grandmaster

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    Yeah interesting system. Those hats are really good. You can elbow head butt them and eye gouge them with as much juice as you want without dropping people.
     
  6. gpseymour

    gpseymour MT Moderator Staff Member

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    Looks good - my only concern was the sheer abandon in the head butts - looked like they could easily knock themselves out with that if the gear wasn't there. Everything else was really good - nice commitment, reasonable power, good speed and form. Much better than many fights I've seen.
     
  7. drop bear

    drop bear Sr. Grandmaster

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    It is a top class competition. You can represent your country in it.
     
  8. TSDTexan

    TSDTexan Master of Arts

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    Actually... Karate is arguably an MMA that became a formalized or specialliazed MA in its own right.

     
  9. Hanzou

    Hanzou Grandmaster

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    In all honesty all martial arts are mixed. The issue arises when an art refuses to fill its weaknesses and chooses to adhere to tradition instead of adapting to the changing world around it. The thing about MMA and Bjj is that they're both very dynamic styles that are evolving rapidly in multiple directions, unlike say Okinawan karate which is pretty traditional, and adverse towards change.
     
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  10. gpseymour

    gpseymour MT Moderator Staff Member

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    I don't know many instructors in any art who aren't working on filling gaps in what they teach their students, except those who teach arts purely for internal development. Those who train folks for competition are filling gaps that fit the competition, and those who train for self-defense are filling gaps for the street. Sometimes they fill those gaps from other arts and styles, sometimes they fill those gaps with techniques that belong in the style but were left out at some point, and some fill those gaps with what other instructors in their art are doing. This has been one of the bonuses of things like YouTube - instructors can see what's being done elsewhere in their art, as well as in other arts.

    I'm certain not all are successful, regardless of their area of focus, and I know there are some instructors who either ignore the gaps or leave them for the students to fill with other training. In the end, most students won't train often enough or long enough to fill all those gaps, anyway, so the gap-filling is mostly for the benefit of the small percentage who do.
     
  11. Ironbear24

    Ironbear24 Senior Master

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    Our Sigung often encouraged us to learn from other martial arts. But then again I guess kenpo is very different from most forms of karate.
     
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  12. gpseymour

    gpseymour MT Moderator Staff Member

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    I have known instructors who didn't encourage experimenting with or learning from other arts, and some who even discouraged it. Most that I've known, however, are much like your Sigung, and appreciate the cross-pollination of thoughts and ideas. The biggest challenge is when someone doesn't understand why they can't do something in one dojo the same way they did in another.
     
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  13. Ironbear24

    Ironbear24 Senior Master

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    I see it like this, you don't go to Calculus class to show off your skills in Geometry and you wouldn't go to a Spanish class to show everyone how well you speak French. You go there to learn from them and not to teach them or show them what you know.
     
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  14. gpseymour

    gpseymour MT Moderator Staff Member

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    Agreed. There are exceptions, of course. If an experienced BJJ guy shows up for my classes, I'll eventually ask to roll with him to see if he knows enough for me to learn some new stuff from him. That's like someone in the Spanish class asking you to say something in French, then asking you to teach them to count to ten in French. If it's invited, it's okay. Otherwise, stick to the purpose at hand.
     
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  15. dmsaint

    dmsaint White Belt

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    It should be called Mixed Combat Sports
     
  16. Steve

    Steve Mostly Harmless

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    Why?
     
  17. dmsaint

    dmsaint White Belt

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    Because all the "martial arts" involved in my favorite martial art are combat sports. The term "martial arts" is generic, covering things it doesn't apply to imo. Some arts are martial arts, some are martial arts and combat sports, some are combat sports without any real art to them at all. In MMA even the art element of those arts that are arts and sports is not used, just the combat side. On the flip side of the coin, MMA wouldn't be very usable in the forms competition at the local martial arts tournament.....it seems there are arts and there are combat sports. There are also military combatives , which are expressed in many martial arts, but that is a different topic. MMA is a popular combat sport. Tai Chi, Aikido, and Bagua(for instance) can be combined to create mixed martial arts.....in the literal sense of the word.
     
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  18. Steve

    Steve Mostly Harmless

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    So, combat sports aren't martial arts. Is judo a martial art or a combat sport? What about kendo?

    Just trying to figure out what you mean by martial art and combat sport. I see martial art as a much broader term. Th way I usually use the terms, a combat sport is a subset of martial arts.
     
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  19. gpseymour

    gpseymour MT Moderator Staff Member

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    Who is this a reply to? For most folks I know, we differentiate between "art" and "sport" with a hazy grey area of overlap between. Judo falls in both categories, as does Kendo. Some styles (or, more accurately, some schools) are all sport. Some are all art. Some are a mix. MMA isn't an art in my mind, because it's not a single style. Frankly, MMA is a style of competition, which includes several different martial arts/martial sports.
     
  20. dmsaint

    dmsaint White Belt

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    I practice Judo, it's definitely a combat sport. I also practice American Kenpo Karate, it is mostly art....forms, choreographed techniques, rituals etc (art). I don't really need a training partner to practice kenpo and don't need equipment to enhance my fitness. I can zone out and meditate on the art side of it for hours (the dance) (the imagination)....art is artistic expression. Sport is competitive application123
     

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