What Japanese MA is This?

Discussion in 'Japanese Martial Arts - General' started by macher, Apr 9, 2018.

  1. macher

    macher Green Belt

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    Hi beginner MA here. What’s the name of this MA? Thanks!


     
  2. Tony Dismukes

    Tony Dismukes MT Moderator Staff Member

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    It’s Bujinkan taijutsu, or else some off-shoot of the Bujinkan.
     
  3. macher

    macher Green Belt

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    Thanks looks like a pretty effective MA for self defense.
     
  4. macher

    macher Green Belt

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  5. Tony Dismukes

    Tony Dismukes MT Moderator Staff Member

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    "Taijutsu" is somewhat of a generic term. "Bujinkan Taijutsu" is the specific art in question. The school you are looking at would be a reasonable place to learn it. (Other than the fact that they only offer one class per week, which IMO, will make it hard to progress very quickly.)
     
  6. macher

    macher Green Belt

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    Yea I hear what you’re saying about 1 class / week.
     
  7. macher

    macher Green Belt

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    Talked to the Sensei at linked Dojo. The reason they have 1 class / week is because they are new about 6 months and it’s a small group. He said as the group gets bigger then they’ll have more classes.
     
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  8. Tez3

    Tez3 Sr. Grandmaster

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    Sounds fair, better to start small and keep going. it's annoying to start something, train every day and then find it's closed because they can't pay rent etc. More than once a week would be better but if you enjoy it and they expand to more classes for the long term it will be worth staying with them.
     
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  9. gpseymour

    gpseymour MT Moderator Staff Member

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    That was how my program started. It’s likely a sideline for the instructor, which tells you nothing (good or bad) about the quality, though it would mean it’s less likely to fold for lack of income.
     
  10. macher

    macher Green Belt

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    The instructor admits that training 1 day / week progression will be slower but he did say he’s looking at a permanent facility. He said his only thing is to cover expenses such as rent to the current facility they use space in once a week.

    What I really like about this art is it seems Tai Chi / Bagua like but seems more geared towards self defense in real life practical situations. I was a Bagua practitioner years ago until our teacher left for the West coast and haven’t found a teacher either in Bagua or Tai Chi that teaches using it for real. The schools that I have visited only do form or for excercise which is fine but not for me.
     
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  11. marques

    marques Master Black Belt

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    I am not so optimistic... Only from the first 30 sec:

    It is required to step back as fast as a jab. Sometimes, I cannot even blink (so I do all I can to keep out of range all the time). I couldn’t do it. (If someone does it against me, next is obviously a kick, not a punch in the air.)

    Then he goes back too far away for no reason, losing all control over the opponent and being too far for any effective counter... 50 cents.
     
    Last edited: Apr 12, 2018
  12. Tony Dismukes

    Tony Dismukes MT Moderator Staff Member

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    Opinions vary. The first black belt I earned was in the Bujinkan. They have some excellent physical principles and tactical concepts. Some of the fundamental techniques are reasonably solid. Unfortunately, their training methods are (IMO) lacking. They train against stylized attacks which are typical of neither an untrained assailant or a skilled fighter. As a result, they tend to develop technique sequences which will work only if someone attacks in a completely unrealistic manner.

    I think my time training in the Bujinkan was valuable to my development as a martial artist, but I use almost none of the technical curriculum any more.
     
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  13. oftheherd1

    oftheherd1 Senior Master

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    I think it is unfair for us to be too critical without being there and seeing exactly how he is teaching. He may be teaching things he has never taught his student before, and therefor not moving at speed, or with force. Before the night or next week is done, he may be correcting all the things we see.

    That said, my problem with the first technique is leaving the opponent's left hand alone too long, at least in his demo. I don't see that he is taking the opponent's left hand out of play as demonstrated. In the second technique I would not tell students I want him to grab me. What if he doesn't? I would tell them if he grabs do... Because if he grabs you that way, what you are seeing is a counter to your defense. Then tell them there is a counter to that counter, and do this.

    I also didn't like the way he manipulated the wrist. I thought it a little clumsy, but I think doable if the opponent doesn't have a very strong grip. Better to simply pin against the back of the wrist and put the arm over the opponent's arm and take him to the ground. No bunny hop needed. But once he appears to be trying to grab the wrist not pin it.

    But @macher don't be too quick to decide you don't want to try that school. As I said, it is difficult for us viewing (or at least me. I can't really speak for Marques), to be sure we know his teaching techniques. I do like grappling since my art is Hapkido, so I really encourage you to try his school and decide for yourself.
     
  14. marques

    marques Master Black Belt

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    Always classy, Tony. :) Some guys are easily psyched out, not you. (Tough opponent, I guess.)

    The kind of observations I did from 50 sec of a video I could do about most martial arts (or you about my technique).

    My point is these “stylized attacks” issue could be solved with some “freestyle attacks” component (in case the instructor is able to). Issues would be detected, solutions would be found. Arts would progress.

    It is what I would like to see more often.. I am never impressed with planned, slow motion attack-defence.
     
  15. macher

    macher Green Belt

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    When I practiced Bagua years ago the teacher incorporated boxing. And when we sparred we sparred with boxers. Most MA from my experience are stylized attack’s except for the Krav Maga school I visited.

    I’m more interested in free style semi full contact MA even if the teacher modifies the MA for real life combat. I’m thinking taking up boxing again because of this.
     
  16. dunc

    dunc Green Belt

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    Hi

    Yup it looks like this is a bujinkan dojo (or similar)

    But.....
    It looks like the teacher is making stuff up, rather than training the art. In my view he hasn’t got the skill or experience to be doing that
     
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  17. BlazeLeeDragon

    BlazeLeeDragon Blue Belt

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    The Sensei is a great guy and the class is a very positive environment. He use to train with Stephen Hayes and others within the bujinkan and the USA spin off group. He calls it simply "Budo", he drills his students with applications and tries to apply them to modern situations. He does also do more historical training if a student is interested but more of a study standpoint. After all we would not be running down the street with a yari or fighting against an armored samurai today. At least I hope not. If you have a chance to visit his dojo I would highly recommend it.
     
  18. dunc

    dunc Green Belt

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    That’s great to hear

    In my view if you are changing things (which is a good and natural approach to take), then you either need guidance and feedback from very experienced teachers or you need to test your methods and iterate - or a combination of the two

    Judging by the clip posted - I doubt that’s happened here
     
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  19. macher

    macher Green Belt

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    I watched the clip again and what I don’t like is the staged punches. I would prefer ‘come at me with all you got’.
     
  20. gpseymour

    gpseymour MT Moderator Staff Member

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    "Staged punches" are always the starting point for defending against punches. It's a problem if practice doesn't move beyond that.
     
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